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William Tyler

Assoc Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 9709
Assoc Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 9709
Biography

EDUCATION  

Postdoctoral Fellowship, Neuroscience

Harvard University

Cambridge, MA   02/2003 – 08/2006                   

 

Doctorate of Philosophy, Behavioral Neuroscience

University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB)

Birmingham, AL   09/1998 – 01/2003

 

Bachelor of Science

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Birmingham, AL   09/1991 – 08/1998                              

 

ACADEMIC & PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS

Associate Professor of Biological Engineering, Arizona State University, School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering (SBHSE),  06/2014 – Present

  • Serve as an invited academic expert on industry, government, and foundation panels to address the societal, regulatory, security, and technological impact of digital/mobile health, neuromodulation, and human performance enhancement.
  • Develop technology for non-invasive brain stimulation and neuromodulation for a variety of forward-looking applications.

Co-Founder and Chief Scientific Officer, Thync, Inc.,  08/11 – 3/16                     

  • Developed the scientific vision and foundation for the company.
  • Responsible for overseeing scientific activities related to internal and subcontracted R&D, product/pipeline development, prosecuting and managing intellectual property portfolio (6 issued patents, 59 patent applications), regulatory compliance (navigated direct-to-consumer FDA exemption as a lifestyle/wellness device via 513(g)), external communications (public/press, government, and investor relations), strategic network development and operations.  
  • Managed scientific support for all stages of the company’s product lifecycle from product conceptualization and prototyping to industrial design and usability testing, manufacturing, launch and distribution. This required cross-department coordination of up to 50 employees spanning software, hardware/engineering, research, marketing, operations, and customer support teams.
  • Spearheaded the deployment of company technology to restore or enhance performance in healthy individuals and elite performers. Secured and managed a contracts from the U.S. Department of Defense. 

Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and Sciences, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and VTC School of Medicine,  02/2011 – 06/2014                           

  • Recruited, led, managed, and worked a with research team that was established to optimize noninvasive neuromodulation systems.
  • Served as an invited academic expert or an industry consultant to study, present, and forecast trends in noninvasive brain stimulation for therapeutic applications and human performance enhancement to medical device, biotech, pharmaceutical companies, and others.
  • My research group developed methodological approaches (including all safety validation) for human neuromodulation using transcranial focused ultrasound. We showed that transcranial pulsed ultrasound can enhance sensory discrimination when targeted to intact human cortex. These observations represented the translation of ultrasonic neuromodulation from brain slices, mice, non-human primates, pigs, and humans pioneered and led by my research groups. We also validated a method of improving the targeting accuracy of transcranial magnetic stimulation using finite element simulations of electric field distributions on a personalized basis. We further conducted basic investigations into how the viscoelastic properties of neurons affect brain function and neuronal signaling.

Co-Founder & President, SynSonix, LLC ,  08/2006 – 02/2011 

  • Proposed, negotiated, and secured contracts from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command to develop ultrasonic neuromodulation technology for the control of post-traumatic pain. Managed and directed performance efforts to achieve research and development milestones per contract obligations. 
  • Established and managed all company relations. Negotiated licensing of intellectual property.

Assistant Professor of Neurobiology and Bioimaging, Arizona State University,  08/2006 – 02/2011  

  • Contracted, performed on, and managed federally funded research projects for the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and U.S. Army Research Office to conduct basic research on and develop noninvasive neuromodulation approaches using pulsed ultrasound.
  • Disclosed inventions (16 issued patents, 15 pending) for methods, systems, and devices intended to modulate and regulate brain function, human behavior, and cellular physiology using pulsed ultrasound.
  • Fulfilled primary obligations as a tenure track faculty member in the School of Life Sciences. Began and instructed the flagship undergraduate neuroscience course at Arizona State University.  Lectured on optical systems, synaptic plasticity, and neural circuits in graduate student courses. Supervised research efforts of undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows.

 

Images
Spatial resolution of noninvasive brain stimulation methods.

Spatial resolution of noninvasive brain stimulation methods.

The figure shows work from our lab estimating the spatial resolution of the current distribution for transcranial direct current stimulation, the distribution of the electric field generated by transcranial magnetic stimulation, and the acoustic field produced by transcranial focused ultrasound. The methods we have developed for the stimulation and modulation of neuronal activity offer higher spatial resolutions than conventional electrical or magnetic methods of brain neuromodulation as shown. Data shown are from: Neuroimage 81, 253-264. PMID: 23644000 and Nature Neuroscience 17, 322-329. PMID: 24413698
Modulation of peripheral and central nervous system activity by ultrasound.

Modulation of peripheral and central nervous system activity by ultrasound.

We have demonstrated that pulsed and continuous wave ultrasound can be used to non-invasively modulate peripheral neural circuits. The manner by which ultrasound modulates neuronal activity can produce different sensations that are encoded by the brain in a manner that is similar to natural somatosensory stimuli. This supports the use of ultrasound for peripheral neuromodulation in therapeutic and diagnostic applications, as well as for consumer applications such as immersive or enhance communication like those employed by ultrahaptics or touchless mid-air haptic interfaces utilizing ultrasound. Data shown are from: PLoS One 7(12), e51177. PMID: 23226567
Research Interests

Our primary R&D interests are focused on developing and applying noninvasive neuromodulation methods and devices intended to optimize human performance and brain health. We are particularly interested in developing electrical, ultrasonic, and alternative technologies or interfaces that are capable of precisely regulating the human autonomic nervous system, as well as deep-brain circuits to regulate arousal, attention, learning, and sleep/wake cycles. In addition to developing methods and tools for enhancing human performance, we also work on developing technologies that can be useful to treat some neurological diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders. Our collective goal is to enhance human brain health and performance through the development of robust, scientifically-validated, and safe neurotechnologies. 

Publications

Peer-reviewed Publications

  1. Limited output transcranial electrical stimulation (LOTES-2017): Engineering principles, regulatory statutes, and industry standards for wellness, over-the-counter, or prescription devices with low risk. M. Bikson, B. Paneri, A. Mourdoukoutas, Z. Esmaeilpour, B.W. Badran, R. Azzam, D. Adair, A. Datta, X-H Fang, B. Wingeier, D. Chao, M. Alonso-Alonso, K. Lee, H. Knotkova, A.J. Woods, D. Hagedorn, D. Jeffery, J. Giordano, and W.J. Tyler (2017). Brain Stimulation in press. PMID: 29122535.
  2. Deep-brain stimulation: No implant needed. Tyler, W.J. and A. Opitz (2017). Nature Biomedical Engineering 1, 632-633. doi: 10.1038/s41551-017-0120-y
  3. Transcranial focused ultrasound: a new tool for non-invasive neuromodulation. Fini, M., and W.J. Tyler (2017). International Review of Psychiatry 29(2), 168-177. PMID: 28430535.
  4. Multimodal Neural Interfaces for Augmenting Human Cognition. Tyler, W.J. (2017). In: Schmorrow D., Fidopiastis C. (eds) Augmented Cognition. Enhancing Cognition and Behavior in Complex Human Environments. AC 2017. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 10285. Springer, Cham https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-58625-0_29.
  5. Non-invasive neural stimulation. Tyler, W.J., J.L. Sanguinetti, M. Fini, and N. Hool (2017). Proc. SPIE 10194, Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications IX, 101941L. doi: 10.1117/12.2263175.
  6. Transdermal electrical neuromodulation of the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex improves sleep quality and mood. Boasso, A., H. Mortimore, R. Silva, L. Aven, and W.J. Tyler (2016). bioRxiv 043901; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/043901.
  7. Tolerability of Repeated Application of Transcranial Electrical Stimulation with Limited Outputs to Healthy Subjects. Paneri, B., D. Adair, C. Thomas, N. Khadka, V. Patel, W. J. Tyler, L. Parra, M. Bikson (2016).  Brain Stimulation 9(5), 740-54. PMID: 27372844
  8. Transdermal neuromodulation of noradrenergic activity suppresses psychophysiological and biochemical stress responses in humans. Tyler, W.J., A. Boasso, H.M. Mortimore, R.S. Silva, J.D. Charlesworth, M.A. Marlin, K.A. Aebersold, L. Aven, D.Z. Wetmore, and S.K. Pal (2015). Scientific Reports 5, 13865, 1-17. PMID: 26353920
  9. Is sham cTBS real cTBS? The effect on EEG dynamics. Opitz, A., W. Legon, J. Mueller, A. Barbour, W. Paulus, and W.J. Tyler (2015). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8, 1043. PMID: 25620925
  10. Transcranial focused ultrasound modulates intrinsic and evoked EEG dynamics. Mueller, J., W. Legon, A. Opitz, T.F. Sato, W.J. Tyler (2014). Brain Stimulation 7(6), 900-908. PMID: 25265863
  11. A quantitative overview of biophysical forces impinging on neural function. Mueller, J. and W.J. Tyler (2014). Physical Biology 11(5), 1-15. PMID: 25156965
  12. Transcranial focused ultrasound modulates the activity of primary somatosensory cortex in humans. Legon, W., T.F. Sato, A. Opitz, J. Mueller, A. Barbour, A. Williams, and W.J. Tyler (2014). Nature Neuroscience 17, 322-329. PMID: 24413698
  13. Physiological observations validate finite element models for estimating subject-specific electric field distributions induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the human motor cortex. Optiz, A., W. Legon, A. Rowlands, W. Paulus, W. Bickel, and W.J. Tyler (2013). Neuroimage 81, 253-264. PMID: 23644000
  14. The mechanobiology of brain function. Tyler, W.J. (2012). Nature Reviews Neuroscience 13(12), 867-878. PMID: 23165263
  15. Pulsed ultrasound differentially stimulates somatosensory circuits in humans as indicated by EEG and fMRI. Legon, W., A. Rowlands, A. Opitz, T. Sato, and W.J. Tyler (2012). PLoS One 7(12), e51177. PMID: 23226567
  16. Ultrasonic neuromodulation by brain stimulation with pulsed ultrasound. Tufail, Y., A. Yoshihiro, S. Pati, M. Li, W.J. Tyler (2011). Nature Protocols 6(9), 1453-1470. PMID: 21886108
  17. Ultrasound for neuromodulation? A continuum mechanics hypothesis. Tyler, W.J. (2011). Neuroscientist 17(1), 25-36. PMID: 20103504
  18. Transcranial pulsed ultrasound stimulates intact brain circuits. Tufail, Y., A. Matyushov, N. Baldwin, M.L. Tauchmann, J. Georges, A. Yoshihiro, S.I. Helms Tillery, W.J. Tyler (2010). Neuron 66(5), 681-694. PMID: 20547127
  19. Noninvasive functional neurosurgery using ultrasound. Tyler, W.J., Y. Tufail, and S. Pati (2010). Nature Reviews Neurology 6(1), 13-14. PMID: 20057495
  20. Remote excitation of neuronal circuits using low-intensity, low-frequency ultrasound. Tyler, W.J., Y. Tufail, M. Finsterwald, M.L. Tauchmann, E.J. Olsen, C. Majestic (2008). PLoS One 3(10) e3511. PMID: 18958151
  21. Modulation of the regulatory activity of bacterial two-component Regulatory Systems by SlyA. Song, H, W. Kong, N. Weatherspoon, G. Qin, W. Tyler, J. Turk, R. Curtis III, Y. Shi (2008). Journal of Biological Chemistry 283 (42), 28158-28168. PMID: 18678876
  22. Experience-dependent modification of primary sensory synapses in the mammalian olfactory bulb. Tyler, W.J., G. Petzold, S. Pal, and V. N. Murthy (2007). Journal of Neuroscience 27, 9427-9438. PMID: 17728456
  23. Kinase activity is not required for alpha-CaMKII-dependent presynaptic plasticity at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. Hojjati, M. R., G. M. van Woerden, W.J. Tyler, K. P. Giese, A. J. Silva, L. Pozzo-Miller, and Y. Elgersma (2007). Nature Neuroscience 10(9) 1125-1127. PMID: 17660813
  24. BDNF increases release probability and the size of a rapidly recycling vesicle pool within hippocampal excitatory synapses. Tyler, W.J., X-l Zhang, K. Hartman, J. Winterer, W. Muller, P.K. Stanton, L. Pozzo-Miller (2006). Journal of Physiology 574 (3), 787-803. PMID: 16709633
  25. Synaptic vesicle Recycling studied in transgenic mice expressing synaptopHluorin. Li, Z., J. Burrone, W.J. Tyler*, K.N. Hartman, D.F. Albeanu, V.N. Murthy (2005).  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 102 (17), 6131-6136 (*cover credit). PMID: 15837917
  26. Synaptic vesicles. Tyler, W.J. and V. N. Murthy (2004). Current Biology 14(8), R294-297. PMID: 15084295
  27. Miniature synaptic transmission and BDNF modulate dendritic spine growth and form in rat CA1 pyramidal neurones. Tyler, W.J., and L. D. Pozzo-Miller (2003). Journal of Physiology (London) 553(2), 497-509. PMID: 14500767
  28. The role of neurotrophins in neurotransmitter release. Tyler, W.J., S. Perrett, and L. D. Pozzo-Miller (2002). Neuroscientist 8 (6), 524-531. PMID: 12467374
  29. From acquisition to consolidation: On the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling in hippocampal-dependent learning. Tyler*, W.J., M. A. Alonso, C. R. Bramham, and L. D. Pozzo-Miller (2002). Learning and Memory 9 (5), 224-237 (*cover credit). PMID: 12359832
  30. Protein synthesis-dependent and -independent regulation of hippocampal synapses by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Tartaglia, N., J. Du, W.J. Tyler, E. Neale, L. D. Pozzo-Miller, and B. Lu (2001). Journal of Biological Chemistry 276 (40), 37585-37593. PMID: 11483592
  31. Recombinant GABAc receptors expressed in rat hippocampal neurons after infection with an adenovirus containing the human gamma-1 subunit. Filippova, N., A. Sedelnikova, W.J. Tyler, T. L. Whitworth, H. Fortinberry, and D. S. Weiss (2001).  Journal of Physiology (London) 535 (1), 145-153. PMID: 11507165
  32. BDNF enhances quantal neurotransmitter release and increases the number of docked vesicles at the active zones of hippocampal excitatory synapses. Tyler, W.J., and L. D. Pozzo-Miller (2001). Journal of Neuroscience 21 (12), 4249-4258. PMID: 11404410
  33. Celiac vagatomy reduces suppression of feeding by jejunal fatty acid infusions. Cox, J. E., W.J. Tyler, A. Randich, G. R. Kelm, and S. T. Meller (2001). Neuroreport 12 (6), 1093-1096. PMID: 11338171
  34. Suppression of food Intake, body weight, and body fat by jejunal fatty acid infusions. Cox, J. E., W.J. Tyler, A. Randich, G. R. Kelm, S. S. Bharaj, R. J. Jandacek, and S. T. Meller (2000). American Journal of Physiology 278, R604-R610. PMID: 10712279
  35. Responses of celiac and cervical vagal afferents to infusions of lipids in the jejunum or ileum of the rat. Randich, A., W.J. Tyler, J. E. Cox, S. T. Meller, G. R. Kelm, and S. S. Bharaj (2000). American Journal of Physiology 278, R34-R43. PMID: 10644619
  36. Inhibition of sucrose intake by continuous celiac, superior mesenteric, and intravenous CCK-8 infusions. Cox, J. E., S. M. McCown, J. M. Bridges, and W.J. Tyler (1996). American Journal of Physiology 270, R319-R325. PMID: 8779861
  37. Suppression ofsucrose intake by continuous near-celiac and intravenous cholecystokinin infusions in rats. Cox, J. E., G. S. Perdue, and W.J. Tyler (1995). American Journal of Physiology 268, R150-R155. PMID: 7840316

USPTO ISSUED PATENTS

12. US Patent 9,729,252 Method and System for Direct Communication. Issued: 08/2017; Inventors: W. J. Tyler, I. Goldwasser, R. Muratore, S. Pal, T. Sato; Tomo, and D.Z. Wetmore

11. US Patent 9,440,070 Wearable transdermal electrical stimulation devices and methods of using them. Issued: 09/2016; Inventors: I. Goldwasser, W. J. Tyler, J. Charlesworth, S.K. Pal, D.Z. Wetmore, D. Jeffery, and W. Law

10. US Patent 9,403,038 Methods and devices for modulating cellular activity using ultrasound. Issued: 08/2016; Inventor: W.J. Tyler

9.  US Patent 9,393,401 Wearable transdermal neurostimulator having cantilevered attachment. Issued: 07/2016; Inventors: I. Goldwasser, S.K. Pal, J. Charlesworth, W. Law, J.F. Hamlin, D.Z. Wetmore, W.J. Tyler, D. Jeffery

8.  US Patent 9,333,334 Methods for attaching and wearing a neurostimulator. Issued: 05/2016; Inventors: D. Jeffery, I. Goldwasser, W. Law, R. Demers, J.F. Hamlin, D.Z. Wetmore, S.K. Pal, J. Charlesworth, and W.J. Tyler 

7.  US Patent 9,233,244 Transdermal electrical stimulation devices for modifying or inducing cognitive state. Issued: 01/2016; Inventors: S.K. Pal, J. Charlesworth, R. Demers, D.Z. Wetmore, I. Goldwasser, W.J. Tyler, R.L. Gradwohl, P. Lamb, C. Voss

6.  US Patent 9,042,201 Method and system for direct communication. Issued: 05/2015; Inventors: W.J. Tyler, I. Goldwasser, R. Muratore, S. Pal, T. Sato; Tomo, and D.Z. Wetmore

5.  US Patent 9,014,811 Transdermal electrical stimulation methods for modifying or inducing cognitive state. Issued: 04/2015; Inventors: S.K. Pal, J. Charlesworth, R. Demers, D.Z. Wetmore, I. Goldwasser, W.J. Tyler, R. Gradwohl, P. Lamb, and C. Voss

4.  US Patent 9,002,458 Transdermal electrical stimulation devices for modifying or inducing cognitive state. Issued: 04/2015; Inventors: S.K. Pal, J. Charlesworth, R. Demers, D.Z. Wetmore, I. Goldwasser, W.J. Tyler, R.L. Gradwohl. P. Lamb, and C. Voss

3.  US Patent 8,903,494 Wearable transdermal electrical stimulation devices and methods of using them. Issued: 12/2014; Inventors: I. Goldwasser, W.J. Tyler, A. Opitz, T. Sato, J. Charlesworth, S.K. Pal, P. Lamb, C. Voss, S. Cook, R. Demers, R.L. Gradwohl, and D.Z. Wetmore 

2.  US Patent 8,858,440 Methods and devices for modulating cellular activity using ultrasound. Issued: 10/2014; Inventor: W.J. Tyler

1. US Patent 8,591,419 Methods and devices for modulating cellular activity using ultrasound. Issued: 11/2013; Inventor: W.J. Tyler

 

INTERNATIONAL ISSUED PATENTS

12. Japan JP5879402B2 Methods and devices for modulating cellular activity using ultrasound. Issued: 02/2016; Inventor: W.J. Tyler

11.  Israel IL219584 Methods and devices for modulating cellular activity using ultrasound. Issued: 01/2016; Inventor: W.J. Tyler

7-10.  Europe, France, Germany and United Kingdom EP2496307B2 Methods and devices for modulating cellular activity using ultrasound. Issued: 01/2016; Inventor: W.J. Tyler

6.  China ZL 2009 8 0135241.4 Methods and devices for modulating cellular activity using ultrasound. Issued: 07/2015; Inventor: W.J. Tyler

2-5.  Europe, France, Germany, and United Kingdom EP2310094B1 Methods and devices for modulating cellular activity using ultrasound. Issued: 10/2014; Inventor: W.J. Tyler

1.  Japan JP5597198B2 Methods and devices for modulating cellular activity using ultrasound. Issued: 08/2014; Inventor: W.J. Tyler

​Patent Applications (International applications not listed)

33. Methods and devices for regulating sensory and perceptual processes by noninvasive spinal cord modulation (USPTO application #62/566,513), October, 2017. Inventors: William J. Tyler and Daniel Z. Wetmore; Assignee: IST, LLC.

32. Systems and methods for craniocervical neuromodulation (USPTO application #62/533,791), July, 2017. Inventors: William J. Tyler and Daniel Z. Wetmore; Assignee: IST, LLC.

31. Neuromodulation of vaginal structure and function (USPTO application #62/481,114), April, 2017. Inventors: William J. Tyler and Daniel Z. Wetmore; Assignee: IST, LLC.

30. Aesthetic neurotechnology and cosmetic neuromodulation (USPTO application #62/484,614), April, 2017. Inventors: William J. Tyler and Daniel Z. Wetmore; Assignee: IST, LLC.

29. Neuromodulation devices for targeting sebaceous glands and methods of using them (USPTO application #62/489,553), April, 2017. Inventors: William J. Tyler and Daniel Z. Wetmore; Assignee: IST, LLC.

28.  Methods and devices for neurosuppression of skin, muscle, and nerve structures (USPTO application #62/476,736), March, 2017. Inventors: William J. Tyler and Daniel Z. Wetmore; Assignee: IST, LLC.

27.  Methods and devices for modulation of integrated neural networks to influence composite sensory processes (USPTO application #62/475,004), March, 2017. Inventors: William J. Tyler and Daniel Z. Wetmore; Assignee: IST, LLC.

26. Transdermal electrical devices and methods for modifying or inducing cognitive state (PCT/US2014/44870), June 2014. S. Pal, J. Charlesworth, R. Demers, D. Wetmore, I. Goldwasser, W.J. Tyler, R. Gradwohl, P. Lamb, and C. Voss. 

25. Transdermal electrical stimulation systems (USPTO #61/975,118), April 2014. Inventors: I. Goldwasser, S. Pal, J. Charlesworth, R. Demers, R. Gradwohl, P. Lamb, C. Voss, T. Sato, W.J. Tyler, and D. Wetmore.

24. Systems and methods for neuromodulation (USPTO #61/953,750), March 2014. Inventors: S. Pal, J. Charlesworth, I. Goldwasser, D. Wetmore, and W.J. Tyler.

23. Radial mode ultrasound array apparatuses and methods for using them (USPTO #61/953,746), March 2014. Inventors: W. Law, T. Sato, and W.J. Tyler.

22. Systems and methods for neuromodulation of attention, sensory processing, and information processing (USPTO #61/953,744), March 2014. Inventors: W.J. Tyler, T. Sato, and S. Pal.

21. Systems and methods for shaping transdermal electrical stimulation waveforms (USPTO #61/942,647), February 2014. Inventors: J. Charlesworth, S. Pal, R. Demers, W.J. Tyler, I. Goldwasser, and D. Wetmore.

20. Neuromodulation control and user interface systems (USPTO #61/900,880), November 2013. Inventors: I. Goldwasser, S. Pal, J. Charlesworth, D. Wetmore, and W.J. Tyler.

19. Systems and methods for transcranial electrical stimulation during a performance or group event (USPTO #61/875,891), September 2013. Inventors: S. Pal, J. Charlesworth, I. Goldwasser, D. Wetmore, and W.J. Tyler

18. Transcranial electrical stimulation systems and methods (USPTO #61/845,845), July 2013. Inventors: I. Goldwasser, S. Pal, J. Charlesworth, R. Demers, R.L. Gradwohl, P. Lamb, C. Voss, T. Sato, and W.J. Tyler.

17. Transcranial focused ultrasound (USPTO #61/816,680; PCT/US2014/035413), April 2013. Inventors: W.J. Tyler, T. Sato, A. Opitz, D. Wetmore, and I. Goldwasser.

16. Transcranial neuromodulation systems (USPTO #61/767,945; PCT/US2014/018061), February 2013. Inventors: D. Wetmore, I. Goldwasser, W.J. Tyler, T. Sato, J. Charlesworth, and S. Pal.

15. Disposable and semi-disposable transcranial ultrasound neuromodulation systems (USPTO #61/764,759; PCT/US2014/016178), February 2013. Inventors: D. Wetmore, I. Goldwasser, W.J. Tyler, T. Sato, J. Charlesworth, and S. Pal.

14. Transcranial neuromodulation controller and delivery systems (USPTO #61/770,479), February 2013. Inventors: D. Wetmore, I. Goldwasser, W.J. Tyler, T. Sato, and S. Pal.

13. Ultrasound neuromodulation for cognitive enhancement (USPTO #13/734,216), January 2013. Inventors: D.J. Mischelevich, D. Wetmore, W.J. Tyler, and T. Sato.

12. Disposable and semi-disposable transcranial electrical stimulation systems (USPTO #61/729,851), November 2012. Inventors: I. Goldwasser, D. Wetmore, W.J. Tyler, A. Opitz, T. Sato, J. Charlesworth, S. Pal, P. Lamb, C. Voss, S. Cook.

11. Systems and methods for providing mesoscopic mechanical disturbances to the central nervous system (USPTO #61/733,959), November 2012. Inventors: J. Mueller, A. Opitz, W. Legon, and W.J. Tyler.

10. Transcranial electrical stimulation systems (USPTO #61/765,795), November 2012. Inventors: I. Goldwasser, D.Z. Wetmore, W.J. Tyler, A. Opitz, T. Sato, J. Charlesworth, S. Pal, P. Lamb, C. Voss, and S. Cook.

9. Systems and devices for coupling ultrasound energy to a body (USPTO #61/694,714; PCT/US2013/057131), August 2012. Inventors: T.F. Sato, W.J. Tyler, P. Lam, D.Z. Wetmore, H-T. Chang, I. Goldwasser.

8. Device and methods for noninvasive neuromodulation using targeted transcranial electrical stimulation (USPTO #61/663,409; PCT/US2013/047174), June 2012. Inventors: W.J. Tyler, D.Z. Wetmore, A. Opitz, T. Sato, and S. Pal.

7. Ultrasound neuromodulation treatment of anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder (USPTO #61/508,687), June, 2012. Inventors: D.J. Mischelevich, T. Sato, W.J. Tyler, and D.Z. Wetmore.

6.  Improvement of sensory stimulation (USPTO #61/621,112), April 2012. Inventors: W.J. Tyler, W. Legon, A. Rowlands, A. Opitz, and T.F. Sato.

5.  Devices and methods for targeting of transcranial ultrasound neuromodulation by automated transcranial Doppler imaging (USPTO #61/619,233; PCT/US2013/035014), April 2012. Inventors: W.J. Tyler, P. Mourad, and D.Z. Wetmore.

4. Ultrasound neuromodulation treatment of depression and bipolar disorder (USPTO #13/426,424), March 2012. Inventors: D.J. Mischelevich, T. Sato, W.J. Tyler, and D.Z. Wetmore.

3. Optimization of ultrasound waveform characteristics for transcranial ultrasound neuromodulation (USPTO #61/581,905; PCT/US2013/0197401), December 2011. Inventors: T. Sato, W. J. Tyler, and D. Wetmore.

2. Method and System for Direct Communication (USPTO #61/550,334), October 2011. Inventors: W. J. Tyler, I. Goldwasser, R. Muratore, S. Pal, T. Sato, and D. Wetmore.

1. Devices and Methods for Modulating Brain Activity (USPTO #61/257,915), 2009. Inventor: W. J. Tyler

Research Activity

CURRENT RESEARCH FUNDING

2017 - Two DARPA Targeted Neuroplasticity Training (TNT) Contracts via 1) ASU and 2) U. Maryland for Enhancing Learning and Training Outcomes using Neuromodulation.
2017 - NSF I/UCRC BRAIN (Building Rehabilitative and Assistive Neural Interfaces) with Marco Santello in collaboration with U. Houston and an Industry Round Table.

COMPLETED RESEARCH FUNDING

6. Sponsored Research Award, Neurotrek, Inc., Investigating the modulation of sensorimotor brain activity using peripherally or centrally delivered pulsed ultrasound, PI – W.J. Tyler (VTCRI), $151,360, 09/12 – 12/13.

5. McKnight Technological Innovation in Neurosciences Award, Functional Modulation of Intact Primate Brain Circuits using Pulsed Ultrasound, Co-PIs – W.J. Tyler (50% share, VTCRI) and Doris Tsao (50% share, Caltech), $200,000, 07/12 – 06/14.

4. Defense Advanced Reseacrh Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award, The Development of Pulsed Ultrasound for Novel Neural Interfaces, PI - W.J. Tyler, Arizona State University, $300,000, 08/01/2010 – 07/31/2012.

3. DoD/US Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command (W911NF-09-1-0431), Remote Control of Intact Mammalian Brain Circuits Using Pulsed Ultrasound, PI - W.J. Tyler, Arizona State University, $450,009, 09/01/2009 - 08/31/2012.

2. NIH NCCR, Prairie Technologies Two-Photon Microscope, PI - B. Smith, Co-PI - W.J. Tyler, Arizona State University, $457,000.

1. NIH SBIR, NeuroVisions, Subcontractor - W.J. Tyler, Arizona State University, $25,000.

Fellowships

2. NIH Individual NRSA Postdoctoral Fellowship; Synaptic Plasticity in Olfactory Juxtaglomerular Neurons, PI – William Tyler, Harvard University, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology – 09/2004 to 08/2006

1. NIH Institutional NRSA Predoctoral Fellowship; Predoctoral Neuroscience Training Program; PI – John Hablitz, University of Alabama at Birmingham - 2000 to 2001

Grants and Contracts Awarded to Companies

4. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Ultrasonic Neuromodulation for Diagnostic Imaging, Neurotrek, Inc., $509,314, 05/28/2013 – 04/2014.

3. NIH NINDS Omnibus Phase I SBIR (1R43NS080387-01), Noninvasive Ultrasound Neuromodulation for Functional Brain Mapping, Neurotrek, Inc., $735,360, 08/01/12 – 07/31/14.

2. US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Phase II SBIR (W911NF-12-C-0045), Ultrasound for Neuromodulation and Control of Post-Trauma Pain, Neurotrek, Inc., $995,000, 06/21/12 – 06/20/14.

1.  US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Phase I SBIR, Ultrasound for Neuromodulation and Control of Post-Trauma Pain, SynSonix, LLC, $150,000, 08/2010 – 07/2011.

Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
BME 394Special Topics
BME 493Honors Thesis
BME 592Research
BME 599Thesis
BME 792Research
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
BME 413Biomedical Instrumentation
BME 492Honors Directed Study
BME 493Honors Thesis
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
BME 394Special Topics
Presentations

COURSES TAUGHT​

  • Instructor, BME-413, Instrumentation, ASU, Fall, 2017.
  • Instructor, BME-498, Engineering Entrepreneurship, ASU, Spring 2017.
  • Lecturer, Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (BMES 2104), Virginia Tech, Spring, 2013
  • Instructor, Mind Madness etc (BIO-189), Arizona State University, Fall, 2010
  • Instructor, Animal Physiology (BIO-360), Arizona State University, Spring, 2009
  • Course Director, Imaging Structure and Function in the Nervous System, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, Summer, 2008, 2009, and 2010
  • Lecturer, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience (MCN-555), Arizona State University, Fall, 2010, 2009, 2008
  • Lecturer, Human Systems Neuroscience (BME-598), Arizona State University, Spring, 2009, 2008, 2007
  • Lecturer, Mechanisms of Integration (NEIS), University of Arizona College of Medicine PHX, Fall, 2008, 2007
  • Instructor, Neurobiology (BIO-467/591), Arizona State University, Fall, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2007
  • Instructor, Neuroscience Seminar (BIO-495/591), Arizona State University, Fall, 2006, 2008
  • Teaching Fellow, Imaging Structure and Function in the Nervous System, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, Summer, 2007, 2004, and 2003
  • Instructor, Neuroscience: Molecules to Behavior (BIO-494/591), Arizona State University, Fall, 2006
  • Course Assistant, Methods in Neuroscience (MCB-117), Harvard University, Fall, 2004
  • Lecturer, Psychotherapy and Behavior Change (PY-418), UAB, Fall, 2001
  • Instructor, Introduction to Psychology (PY-101), UAB, Spring, 2001
  • Instructor, Elementary Statistical Methods and Experimental Design (PY-217), UAB, Winter, 2001
  • Teaching Assistant, Methods in Psychological Research (PY-215), UAB, Summer, 1999
  • Teaching Assistant, Introduction to Neurobiology (NEUR-704), Dauphin Island Sea Laboratory, 1999

INVITED KEYNOTE LECTURES & PRESENTATIONS​

60. Human Computing Interaction Conference, Vancouver, 2017

59. Human Brain Mapping, Vancouver, 2017

58. Society for Biomedical Devices and Therapeutics, Los Angeles, 2017

57. Plenary Speaker, Noninvasive Neuromodulation for Real World Applications, Minnesota Neuromodulation Symposium, April, 2017 – Minneapolis, MN.

56.  Keynote speaker, Non-invasive Neural Stimulation, SPIE Defense and Commercial Sensing Annual Meeting, April, 2017 – Anaheim, CA.

55.  Invited speaker, Neuromodulation for real world applications, Barrow Neurological Institute, April, 2017 – Phoenix, AZ.

54.  Invited speaker, Neuromodulation for real world applications, NYC Neuromodulation Conference, NERUOMODEC January, 2017 – New York, NY.

53. Keynote speaker, Neuroscience and technology for optimizing sports performance: Beyond 2016, Leaders Sport Performance Summit, June, 2016 – New York, NY.

52. Invited speaker, Neuromodulation for real world applications, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, June, 2016 – Baltimore, MD.

51. Invited speaker, Acoustic Neuromodulation, Artificial Intelligence and Future Neurotechnology, Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics Annual Meeting, April, 2016 – Miami, FL.

50. Invited participant and speaker, Technological forecasting: Noninvasive neural enhancements panel, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Workshop on Human Performance Enhancement, January, 2016 - Somerville, MA.

49. Faculty Speaker, Exponential Medicine, Singularity University, November, 2015 - San Diego, CA

48. Speaker, Society for Biological Psychiatry Annual Meeting, May, 2015 – Toronto, Canada

47. Panelist and Speaker, MakerCon, May, 2015 – San Francisco, CA

46. Keynote Speaker, Harvard Medical School, Center for Neuroethics, May, 2015 – Boston, MA

45. Real World Neurotechnology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Cambridge, MA

44. Horizons in Neurotechnology. Session Chair and Keynote Speaker, CNS Diseases World Summit, September, 2014 – San Francisco, CA.

43. Brain Stimulation Workshop. Organizer and Speaker, Center for Consciousness Studies’ Annual Meeting, April, 2014 – Tucson, AZ

42. Transcranial ultrasound to map and stimulate brain circuits. Invited speaker, World Congress on Brain, Behavior, and Emotions, April, 2014 – Montreal, Canada

41. The development and implementation of methods and devices for ultrasonic neuromodulation. Seminar, Stanford University, March, 2014 – Palo Alto, CA

40.  Future Applications: Human Performance Augmentation. U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) Unified Quest 2014 Keynote Lecture, January, 2014 – Williamsburg, VA

39.  Neurotechnology Ventures Course. M.I.T., October, 2013 – Cambridge, MA

38.  High Resolution Modulation of Human Brain Circuits using Transcranial Focused Ultrasound. Next Generation Medical Imaging Workshop, Carnegie Mellon University, September, 2013 – Pittsburg, PA

37. Translational Studies Investigating the Modulation of Brain Circuits by Pulsed Ultrasound. Southeastern Veterinary Neurology Conference, October, 2012 – Blacksburg, VA

36. Trials and Tribulations of Building a Neurotrechnology Platform and Company. SIPS Intellectual Property Awareness Conference, Virginia Tech, October, 2012 – Blacksburg, VA

35. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation. Medtronic, Inc., August, 2012 – Minneapolis, MN

34. Noninvasive neuromodulation in psychiatric treatment and research. Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine Grand Rounds, August, 2012 – Roanoke, VA

33. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation. Future of Neurotechnology panel speaker, Neurotrechnology Industry Organization Annual Conference, May, 2012 – Boston, MA

32. Pulsed Ultrasound for Noninvasive Neurostimulation. University of Göttingen, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, March, 2012 - Göttingen, Germany.

31. The Evolution of Biological Intelligence through 2061. Defense Intelligence Agency, In-Q-Tel Research Day for DIA 50th Anniversary Celebration, September, 2011 – Washington, D.C.

30. Including Mechanical Waves in our Emerging Portraits of Brain Function. University of California Irvine, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, May, 2011 – Irvine, California.

29. Noninvasive Brain Stimulation and International Security. The Royal Society’s Brain Waves Workshop – Neuroscience: Conflict and Security, May, 2011 - London, England.

28. Mechanical Waves and Consciousness. Towards a Science of Consciousness Symposium, May, 2011 - Stockholm, Sweden.

27. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation. International Society for Therapeutic Ultrasound Annual Meeting, April, 2011 - New York, New York.

26. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation. The National Institutes of Health, March, 2011 - Bethesda, Maryland.

25. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation. Caltech, January, 2011 - Pasadena, California.

24. Transcranial Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulates Intact Brain Circuits. University of Göttingen, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, December, 2010 - Göttingen, Germany.

23. Ultrasound for the Noninvasive Stimulation of Neural Circuits. Defense Sciences Research Council Workshop on New Tools in Neuroscience, October, 2010 - Arlington, Virginia.

22. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation. Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series, Boston University, October, 2010 - Boston, Massachusetts.

21. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation. IEEE International Ultrasonics Meeting, October, 2010 - San Diego, California.

20. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation. Tuft's School of Medicine/New England Medical Center, August, 2010 - Boston, Massachusetts.

19. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation: The Noninvasive Future of Therapeutic Neurostimulation and Brain-Machine

Interfaces. M.I.T. Picower Institute, July, 2010 - Cambridge, Massachusetts.

18. Noninvasive Brain Stimulation with Transcranial Pulsed Ultrasound. University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, February, 2010.

17. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation: The Noninvasive Future of Therapeutic Neurostimulation and Brain-Machine Interfaces. Barrow Neurological Institute, January, 2010 - Phoenix, Arizona.

16. Pulsed Ultrasound for Noninvasive Neural Interfaces. DARPA Novel Neural Interface Workshop, January, 2010 - Arlington, Virginia.

15. Chasing Quanta and Building a Neurotechnology Company in Tough Economic Times. M.I.T. Neurotechnology Ventures Course, November, 2009 - Cambridge, Massachusetts.

14. Ultrasonic Neuromodulation: Noninvasive Remote Control of Intact Brain Circuits using Pulsed Ultrasound. Neural Restoration Workshop, Sandia National Laboratories, November, 2009 - Albuquerque, New Mexico.

13. Remote Stimulation of Neuronal Circuits using Pulsed Ultrasound. Translational Genomics/Barrow Neurological Institute/St. Joseph's Hospital, October, 2009 - Phoenix, Arizona.

12. Remote Stimulation of Neuronal Circuits using Pulsed Ultrasound. Department of Physiology Colloquim Series, July, 2009, University College of London, London, U.K.

11. Remote Excitation of Neuronal Activity using Pulsed Ultrasound. The Physiological Society Meeting, July, 2009, Dublin, Ireland.

10. Future Neurotechnologies. Neurotechnology Industry Organization Partnering Conference, April, 2009, San Francisco, California.

9. Hypersonic Neuromodulation: Noninvasive Control of CNS Activity. Arizona State University and Barrow’s Neurological Institute Joint Neuroscience Symposium, 2008, Phoenix Arizona.

8. Experience-dependent Plasticity in a Primary Olfactory Circuit. Arizona State University and Barrow’s Neurological Institute Joint Neuroscience Symposium, 2007, Phoenix Arizona.

7. Implementing Genetically-encoded Optophysiological Probes to Investigate Neural Circuits. Arizona Imaging and Microanalysis Annual Meeting, 2007, Tempe, Arizona.

6. Optical analysis of neurotransmitter release from individual hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals following BDNF treatment. University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departmental of Neurobiology, Annual Retreat, 2002, Birmingham, Alabama.

5. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor enhances quantal neurotransmitter release, dendritic spine formation, and synapse maturation. University of Alabama at Birmingham Graduate Student Research Day, 2002, Birmingham, Alabama.

4. BDNF increases spine density in CA1 neurons in the absence of action potentials. Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, 2001, Birmingham, Alabama.

3. BDNF enhances quantal neurotransmitter release and increases the number of docked vesicles at the active zones of hippocampal excitatory synapses. UAB Department of Neurobiology, Annual Retreat, 2000, Birmingham, Alabama.

2. BDNF enhances synaptic vesicle docking and quantal transmitter release at hippocampal excitatory synapses. University of Alabama at Birmingham Graduate Student Research Day, 2000, Birmingham, Alabama.

1. Responses of celiac and cervical vagal afferents to infusions of lipids into the jejunum or ileum of the rat.  Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior, National Meeting, Young Investigator Symposium, 1999.

Honors / Awards

·        2015 – Faculty, Exponential Medicine, Singularity University

·        2015 – Named a 2015 “Digital Maverick” by Details Magazine

·        2013 – Distinguished Scholar Alumni Award, Department of Psychology, UAB

·        2013 – Roanoke-Blacksburg Technology Council TechNite Innovation Award

·        2013 – Rising Star Award, Biomedical Engineering Society, Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering

·        2012 – McKnight Technological Innovation in Neuroscience Award (shared with D. Tsao, Caltech)

·        2012 – Center for Innovative Technology, GAP 50 Entrepreneur Awards Finalist

·        2010 – Academic Innovator of the Year, Arizona Research Council and Arizona Governor's Award

·        2010 – Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award

·        2003 – Samuel Barker Award, Dean’s award for excellence in doctoral studies, UAB

·        2002 – Imaging Structure and Function in the Nervous System student, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories

·        2001 – Outstanding Student in Behavioral Neuroscience Award, University of Alabama Birmingham

·        1999 – Young Investigator Travel Award, Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior

·        1994 – John W. P. Ost Undergraduate Research Award, University of Alabama at Birmingham


 

Service
  • SoLS Events Committee, (2007 - 2009)
  • SoLS Safety Committee, (2007 - 2009)
  • Alpha Phi Omega Service Fraternity, Faculty Advisor (2007 - 2008)
  • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories Meetings and Courses, Course Director (2009 - 2009)
  • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories Meetings and Courses, Course Director (2008 - 2008)
Board

Thync, Inc.,  08/11 – 3/16  

Industry Positions

Co-Founder, IST, LLC, 06/17 - present

Co-Founder and Chief Scientific Officer, Thync, Inc.,  08/11 – 3/16                     

  • Developed the scientific vision and foundation for the company; $30M+ raised through Series B-2
  • Responsible for overseeing scientific activities related to internal and subcontracted R&D, product/pipeline development, prosecuting and managing intellectual property portfolio (6 issued patents, 59 patent applications), regulatory compliance (navigated direct-to-consumer FDA exemption as a lifestyle/wellness device via 513(g)), external communications (public/press, government, and investor relations), strategic network development and operations.  
  • Managed scientific support for all stages of the company’s product lifecycle from product conceptualization and prototyping to industrial design and usability testing, manufacturing, launch and distribution. This required cross-department coordination of up to 50 employees spanning software, hardware/engineering, research, marketing, operations, and customer support teams.
  • Spearheaded the deployment of company technology to restore or enhance performance in healthy individuals and elite performers. Secured and managed a contracts from the U.S. Department of Defense.

Co-Founder & President, SynSonix, LLC ,  08/2006 – 02/2011 

  • Proposed, negotiated, and secured contracts from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command to develop ultrasonic neuromodulation technology for the control of post-traumatic pain. Managed and directed performance efforts to achieve research and development milestones per contract obligations. 
  • Established and managed all company relations. Negotiated licensing of intellectual property.