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Nicholas Alozie

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Faculty Head & Professor (FSC)
Faculty, POLY Campus, Mailcode 2780
Biography

Nicholas Alozie is a professor of public policy and founding head of the social science faculty group on the Polytechnic campus. He joined the ASU faculty in 1991 as an assistant professor of public affairs and rose through the ranks in the School of Public Affairs on the Tempe campus, reaching the rank of full professor in 2001. He was recruited to the Polytechnic campus in 2005 to start a division of social science, which is now the social science faculty group in the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts. He oversees the university’s social science degree programs at the Polytechnic campus, including Science, Technology, and Society (STS), Political Science, and Integrated Social Science. Prior to leaving the School of Public Affairs, Alozie served as the director of the master's (MPA) and interdisciplinary doctoral (DPA) programs in public administration, and was a certified program examiner for the National Association of the Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA).

Professor Alozie’s research focuses in the areas of distributive social justice and empowerment, minority and women’s issues in politics and policy, urban transactional politics, and international development, all broadly defined. Within these domains, he conducts applied research that interrogates some of the fundamental questions connecting the haves and the have-nots in human society. He has published widely on these subjects, is internationally recognized as an authority, as measured by his professional invitations, which includes reviewing for top academic journals and grants organizations. He is currently the senior associate editor of the Journal of Public Management and Social Policy, one of American Society for Public Administration’s (ASPA) section journals. While Alozie has designed and taught several courses given his broad training and interest in the social sciences, and sometimes to meet institutional needs, his primary teaching areas are in public policy, political economy, democratization, and research methodology. He is reputed as a teacher’s teacher and has mentored successful masters and doctoral students who have gone into academia and other professions.

Alozie holds the Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in Political Economy from the University of Texas at Dallas, and the B.A. (Hons.) in Political Science and MPA (Master of Public Administration) from Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas. Prior to joining the ASU faculty, he served on the faculty of Iowa State University, at Ames, Iowa.

Education
  • Ph.D. Political Economy, University of Texas-Dallas
  • M.A. Political Econom, University of Texas-Dallas
  • M.P.A. Public Administration, Texas Southern University-Houston
  • B.A. Political Science (Honors), Texas Southern University-Houston
Research Interests

Dr. Alozie’s research focuses in the areas of distributive social justice and empowerment, minority and women’s issues in politics and policy, urban transactional politics, and international development, all broadly defined.  Within these domains, Dr. Alozie conducts applied research that interrogates some of the fundamental questions connecting the haves and the have-nots in human society. For instance, Dr. Alozie invested the early part of his career studying women and minority access to the judiciary and the difference it makes. Since the late 1980s, no major study has been undertaken in the area that has not cited his work as an authority. No state or federal case has been argued in court without the briefs citing his research as an authority in the area. One recently published paper examined the digital gender divide in Africa.

Publications

Selected Publications

  • Nicholas Alozie and Sharon Chanley. “Explaining Mass Attitudes about Economic Security for Nigeria’s Ageing: The Limits of Culture and Tradition.” International Journal of Economic Development, 2017, Vol. 10 (2): 161-191 (Lead Article)
  • Nicholas O. Alozie. “The Gender Gap in Policy Orientation: How Relevant is Locality” International Journal of Public Policy, 2017, Vol. 13 (1-2): 1-20 (Lead Article)
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Patience Akpan-Obong. “The Digital Gender Divide: Confronting Obstacles to Women’s Development in Africa.” Development Policy Review, 2017, Vol. 35 (No. 2): 137-160. Doi: 10.1111/dpr.12204. (Lead Article)
  • Nicholas Alozie, Kathy Thomas, and Patience Akpan-Obong. “Global Liberalization on Homosexuality: Explaining the African Gap.” The Social Science Journal, 2017, Vol. 54 (2): 120-131.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Andrew Ewoh. “Citizen Evaluation of Government and Confidence in Public Institutions in Emerging Islamic Democracies: Evidence from Afghanistan. Journal of Public Management and Social Policy, 2016, Vol. 23 (2): 101-133.
  • Nicholas Alozie, Kathy Thomas, and Patience Akpan-Obong. “Mass Support for Democracy in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Quest for Sustainable Development.”  International Journal of Economic Development, 2016, Vol 10 (No. 1): 32-66.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Kathy Thomas. “United States vs. China in Africa: The Policy Battle for Hearts and Minds and the Difference it makes.” Journal of Public Management and Social Policy, 2015, Vol. 22 (No. 3): 205-227.
  • Lynne L. Manganaro and Nicholas O. Alozie. “The Political Gender Gap in Afghanistan.” The Journal of Women, Politics, & Policy, 2015, Vol. 36 (Issue 3): 285-310.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie, Patience Akpan-Obong, and William A. Foster. “Sizing up Information and Communications Technologies as Agents of Political Development in Sub-Saharan Africa.” Telecommunications Policy, 2011, Vol. 35 (Issue 8): 752-765.
  • Lynne L. Manganaro and Nicholas O. Alozie. “Gender Role Attitudes: Who Supports Expanded Rights for Women in Afghanistan?” Sex Roles, 2011, Vol. 64: 516-529.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Catherine McNamara. “Gender Differences in Willingness to Pay for Urban Public Services.” Urban Affairs Review, 2010, Vol. 45 (No. 3), pgs. 377-390.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Catherine McNamara. “Poverty Status and Willingness to Pay for Local Public Services.” Public Administration Quarterly, winter, 2009, pgs. 520-552.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Catherine McNamara. “Anglo and Latino Differences in Willingness to Pay for Urban Public Services.” Social Science Quarterly, 2008, Vol. 89 (No. 2), pgs. 406-427.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Cherise Moore. “Blacks and Latinos in City Management: Prospects and Challenges in Council-Manager Governments.” International Journal of Public Administration, 2007, Vol. 30 (No. 1), pgs. 47-63. 
  • Nicholas O. Alozie, James Simon, and Bruce Merrill.  “Gender and Political Orientation in Childhood.”  Social Science Journal,   2003, Vol. 40, pgs. 1-18 (lead article).
  • Sharon Ersch and Nicholas O. Alozie. “Policy for the ‘Deserving,’ But Politically Weak: The 1996 Welfare Reform Act and Battered Women.” Policy Studies Review.  Summer, 2001, Vol. 18 (No. 2), pgs. 1-25. Lead Article.
  • Wayne Johnston and Nicholas O. Alozie. “The Effects of Age on Criminal Processing: Is There an Advantage in Being Older? Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2001, Vol. 35 (No.1), pgs. 47-62.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Wayne Johnston. “Probing the Limits of the Female Advantage in Criminal Processing: Pretrial Diversion of Drug Offenders in an Urban County.” Justice System Journal Fall 2000. Vol. 21, (No. 3), pgs. 239-259.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie. 1999. “The Promise of Urban Democracy: Big-City Black Mayoral Service in the early 1990s.” Urban Affairs Review, January, 2000. Vol. 35 (No. 3), pgs. 422-434.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie. “Segregation and Black and Hispanic Group Outcomes: Policing in Large Cities.” American Politics Quarterly July 1999. Vol. 27 (No 3), pgs. 354-375.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Enrique Ramirez. “‘A Piece of The Pie, And More’:  Competition and Hispanic Policing in Local Government.” Urban Affairs Review, January, 1999, Vol. 34 (No. 2), pgs. 456-475.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie. 1999. “The Recruitment of Blacks to State Courts of Last Resort.” The National Political Science Review, Vol. 7, pgs. 173-187.
  • James Simon, Bruce Merrill, and Nicholas Alozie. “Nurturing Democracy, Citizenship and Civic Virtue: The Kids Voting Program Revisited.” Journal of Social Studies Research, spring, 1998. Vol. 22 (No. 1), pgs. 19-27.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie. “Selection Methods and the Recruitment of Women to State Courts of Last Resort.” Social Science Quarterly, March, 1996. Vol. 77 (No. 1), pgs. 110-126.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie. “Scholarly Writers and the Time Capsule” Social Science Quarterly, March, 1996. Vol. 77 (No. 1), pgs. 218-224.   (Editor invited refereed symposium).
  • Nicholas O. Alozie. “Political Tolerance Hypotheses and White Opposition to a Martin Luther King Holiday in Arizona.” The Social Science Journal, January, 1995. Vol. 32 (No. 1), pgs. 1-16 (lead article).
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Lynne Manganaro. “Women’s Council Representation: Measurement Implications for Public Policy.” Political Research Quarterly, June, 1993. Vol. 46 (No. 2), pgs. 383-398.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie and Lynne Manganaro. “Black and Hispanic Council Representation:  Does Council Size Matter?”  Urban Affairs Quarterly, December, 1993. Vol. 29 (No. 2), pgs. 276-298.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie. “The Election of Asians to City Councils.”  Social Science Quarterly, March, 1992. Vol. 73 (No. 1), pgs. 90-100.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie. “Distribution of Women and Minority Judges: The Effects of Judicial Selection Methods.”  Social Science Quarterly, June, 1990. Vol. 71 (No. 2), pgs. 315-325.
  • Nicholas O. Alozie. “Black Representation on State Judiciaries.” Social Science Quarterly, December, 1988. Vol. 69 (No. 4), pgs. 979-986.


 

 

Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
POS 325Public Policy Development
ISS 484Internship
STS 484Internship
POS 484Internship
STS 492Honors Directed Study
STS 498Pro-Seminar
ISS 499Individualized Instruction
STS 499Individualized Instruction
ISS 592Research
Summer 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
POS 346Problems of Democracy
STS 484Internship
POS 493Honors Thesis
POS 498Pro-Seminar
POS 499Individualized Instruction
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
POS 325Public Policy Development
POS 370Law and Society
POS 401Political Statistics
STS 425Law, Values, Sci,& Technology
STS 484Internship
POS 484Internship
STS 493Honors Thesis
STS 498Pro-Seminar
POS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 499Individualized Instruction
ISS 499Individualized Instruction
POS 499Individualized Instruction
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
POS 325Public Policy Development
ISS 484Internship
STS 484Internship
POS 484Internship
STS 492Honors Directed Study
POS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 499Individualized Instruction
ISS 499Individualized Instruction
ISS 592Research
Summer 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
POS 346Problems of Democracy
STS 364Science, Tech,& Nat'l Security
STS 484Internship
STS 494Special Topics
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
POS 325Public Policy Development
STS 484Internship
STS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 499Individualized Instruction
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
POS 325Public Policy Development
STS 484Internship
STS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 499Individualized Instruction
Summer 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
STS 484Internship
STS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 499Individualized Instruction
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
POS 325Public Policy Development
POS 351Democratization
POS 426Elements of Public Policy
STS 484Internship
STS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 499Individualized Instruction
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
POS 325Public Policy Development
Summer 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
STS 484Internship
STS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 499Individualized Instruction
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
STS 301Research in Sci & Tech Studies
STS 306Social Effects of Science Tech
POS 325Public Policy Development
STS 325Science, Tech, & Public Policy
STS 484Internship
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
STS 302Philosophy of Science & Tech
STS 305Science and Social Theory
POS 325Public Policy Development
STS 484Internship
STS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 499Individualized Instruction
Summer 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
STS 301Research in Sci & Tech Studies
STS 484Internship
STS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 499Individualized Instruction
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
STS 301Research in Sci & Tech Studies
STS 305Science and Social Theory
STS 306Social Effects of Science Tech
POS 325Public Policy Development
STS 484Internship
STS 498Pro-Seminar
STS 499Individualized Instruction
Service
  • Senate responsible for all academic policies in the university, Member: Academic Senate (2000 - Present)
  • Review of the Graduate School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado, Denver, Invited External Reviewer (2003 - 2003)
  • Research on Judicial Selection, American Judicature Society, Member, Editorial Board (2000 - 2000)