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Miguel Aguilera

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Associate Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 4302
Biography

MIGUEL ASTOR-AGUILERA (PhD Anthropology - University at Albany/SUNY) is an Arizona State University Associate Professor whose scholarship concentrates on religious studies, sociocultural anthropology, ethnography, material culture, and archaeology focusing on Indigenous epistemologies within Latin America. He specializes in Mesoamerican cosmovisions and their historical traditions, that is, pre-Columbian, colonial, and contemporary. His work specializes on Maya ritual specialists in the Yucatán peninsula and their cosmologies as related to their environment. Astor-Aguilera currently teaches courses at Arizona State University in Religious Studies, within the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies, that are cross-listed with the School of Human Evolution and Social Change (Anthropology) and the School of Transborder Studies (Latin American Studies). He has been Faculty Head (Chair) of Religious Studies, Director of Graduate Studies for Religious Studies, and Associate Director of Graduate Studies for the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies at ASU.

Education
  • PhD. Anthropology, University at Albany/State University of New York
  • MA. Anthropology, University at Albany/State University of New York
  • BS. Anthropology and Latin American Studies, University of California-Riverside
Research Interests

Astor-Aguilera conducts research focused on Indigenous Latin America. He specializes in Mesoamerican religions including that of contemporary “folk” healers in the United States/Mexico border zone. His research, being a sociocultural anthropologist, ethnographer, iconographer, and archaeologist specializing in religious studies is interdisciplinary and social historically holistic in method and theory. Astor-Aguilera currently conducts ethnographic investigations of cenote-sinkholes in the Yucatán peninsula and their associated religious rituals and epistemologies amongst the Maya peoples of Mexico.

Publications

The Maya World of Communicating Objects: Quadripartite Crosses, Trees, & Stones. 2010. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.

Rethinking Relations and Animism: Personhood & Materiality. 2018. Co-Editor Graham Harvey. London: Routledge.

Fall 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
REL 202Religion and Popular Culture
REL 205Life, Sex and Death
REL 599Thesis
REL 792Research
REL 799Dissertation
Spring 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
REL 599Thesis
REL 792Research
REL 799Dissertation
Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
REL 382Magick, Religion and Science
REL 599Thesis
REL 691Seminar
REL 792Research
REL 799Dissertation
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
REL 101Religion, Culture, Public Life
REL 792Research
REL 799Dissertation
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
REL 599Thesis
REL 792Research
REL 799Dissertation
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
REL 101Religion, Culture, Public Life
REL 595Continuing Registration
REL 690Reading and Conference
REL 792Research
REL 799Dissertation
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
REL 792Research
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
REL 100Religions of the World
REL 595Continuing Registration
REL 690Reading and Conference
REL 792Research
REL 799Dissertation
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
REL 595Continuing Registration
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
REL 205Life, Sex and Death
REL 326US Latino Religion & Culture
TCL 328US Latino Religion & Culture
REL 599Thesis
REL 690Reading and Conference
REL 799Dissertation
Service
  • Religious Studies/School of Historical, Philosophical, & Religious Studies, Faculty Leader/ExCom Representative (2014 - 2015)