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Everett Shock

Profile photo
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 6004
Senior Sustainability Scientist
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 6004
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 6004
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 6004
Biography

Everett Shock has joint appointments in the School of Molecular Sciences and also the School of Earth and Space Exploration and is director of the W. M. Keck Foundation Laboratory for Environmental Biogeochemistry at ASU. He earned a B.S. degree in earth sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz in 1978, and a Ph.D. is geology at the University of California, Berkeley, working with Harold Helgeson. He is a fellow of the Geochemical Society and European Association for Geochemistry, and a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He has research interests that span environmental chemistry, geochemistry and biogeochemistry, with current projects in hydrothermal ecosystems, hydrothermal organic chemistry, the deep biosphere, serpentinization, submarine hydrothermal systems, the geochemistry of icy solar bodies, aqueous alteration of meteorite parent bodies and environmental biogeochemistry.

Education
  • Ph.D. University of California-Berkeley 1987
  • B.S. Earth Sciences, University of California-Santa Cruz, 1978
Research Interests

In GEOPIG (Group Exploring Organic Processes in Geochemistry) we explore Earth environments in the field, lab, and computer, to better understand how geochemical processes provide the energy and nutrients that support Earth’s microbiomes. We use what we learn to conceptualize how other planets, especially Ocean Worlds, may support life.

Research Group

2016-2017 GEOPIG Events and Milestones:

 

Dr. Charlene Estrada joined GEOPIG as a SESE Postdoctoral Fellow, Summer 2016

Dr. Kris Fecteau; PhD defense, School of Molecular Sciences, Fall 2016

Dr. Peter Canovas; PhD defense, School of Earth & Space Exploration, Fall 2016

Dr. Brian St Clair; PhD defense, Environmental Life Science Program, Spring 2017

Cuong Doan (“DC”), BS Honors thesis, School of Molecular Sciences, Spring 2017

 

Hydrothermal Ecosystems

GEOPIG researchers have pursued projects in Yellowstone since 1997. We typically find ourselves there at some time each summer. As of 2016 we have a newly funded project to explore the geochemical and biomolecular changes at the transition to photosynthesis in hot spring ecosystems (NASA’s Exobiology program). We are integrating geochemical sampling for major and trace elements, dissolved gases and dissolved organic compounds with sampling for DNA, lipids, pigments, and proteins in microbiomes that span the photosynthetic fringe. Integrating these diverse datasets will involve thermodynamic analyses, multidimensional statistical models, and field experiments on microbial activity. Kris Fecteau and Grayson Boyer are leading this effort, and are building on their ongoing research on pigment (Fecteau) and lipid (Boyer) distributions in hydrothermal ecosystems. Mysteries of photosynthesis in mildly acidic hotsprings feature in a recently submitted paper (Fecteau et al., 2017). Joey Romero is using molecular methods to identify and quantify the microbial communities above, at, and beyond the photosynthetic fringe in multiple Yellowstone locations. Our colleague and former GEOPIG post-doc Alysia Cox is leading the proteomics effort from her faculty position at Montana Tech.

We recently wrapped up a project on making Habitability Maps for iron oxidation and reduction. Brian St Clair designed field experiments to measure rates of microbial reactions together with rates of the corresponding abiotic reactions. He placed his rate data in the context of composition and temperature resulting in diagrams showing where each reaction can support life. Data from Yellowstone hot springs, acid mine drainage in Arizona, and cold iron-rich springs in the Swiss Alps were featured in Brian St Clair’s PhD dissertation research funded by NSF’s Geobiology and Low Temperature Geochemistry Program.

In Summer 2017, our Yellowstone expedition involved experiments on carbon uptake at photosynthetic fringe locations, sampling of systems where photosynthesis appears to be inhibited, and exploration of hydrothermal ecosystems in several areas of Yellowstone that were new to us. As expected, Yellowstone shuffles the cards and deals new and unexpected combinations of variables, which allows systems we have never encountered before. The possibilities seem nearly endless! We are beginning to probe new mysteries with geochemical and biological samples returned to the lab from our fieldwork. The intrepid Vince Debes once again deserves enormous credit for the success of our field efforts, as do all other members of our 2017 field team (Michelle Santana, Dylan Gagler, Mark Williamson, Taylor Walton, Kris Fecteau, Josh Nye, Zhaobo Zhang, Melissa Sedler, with cameo appearances by Brian St Clair, Dan Colman, Melody Lindsay, and Eric Boyd).

Serpentinization

When rocks from Earth’s mantle are exposed to the hydrosphere the resulting alteration process is called serpentinization owing to the formation of serpentine minerals like antigorite, chrysotile and lizardite. As the rocks are altered, so it the water resulting in extremely high pH and highly reduced conditions with abundant dissolved hydrogen. Although such conditions seem novel to us as native dwellers of granitic continents, water-rock reactions in ultramafic rocks like those from the upper mantle may be remarkably common on Ocean Worlds throughout our Solar System. The main serpentinizing field area we have explored is the Samail ophiolite in the Sultanate of Oman, and our work is supported by the Rock-Powered Life NASA Astrobiology Institute grant, through our involvement with an Integrated Earth System project funded by NSF, and through the Deep Energy and Deep Life communities of the Deep Carbon Observatory.  We are combining geochemical and molecular data to quantify the flow of energy and nutrients from the geosphere to the biosphere during serpentinization. Alta Howells is documenting the changes in microbiomes tied to changes in geochemistry, Peter Canovas has calculated the supplies of chemical energy (paper in press at JGR Biogeoscience), Kirt Robinson is following the flow of carbon among inorganic solutes, minerals and organic solutes, and James Leong is delving deeply into the sequences of mineral-rock reactions that can happen throughout serpentinization, and has new models of low-temperature alteration for rocks in Oman that explain the our analytical data from surface waters and hyperalkaline springs. James also explored serpentinization of oceanic crust as part of IODP expedition 360 to the Southwest Indian Ridge, and has emerged with considerable enthusiasm for the alteration of gabbros wherever that can happen.

Microbiomes in Mixing Gradients

A major theme of Alta Howells’ research, funded by a doctoral research grant from NSF, delves into how the physical process of mixing between fluids of different compositions establishes geochemical gradients that shape the resulting transitions in microbiomes. Alta has two field areas, one in Yellowstone where fluids mix from two radically different hot springs, and another in Oman where serpentinizing fluids mix with fresher surface waters. In both areas, she is also investigating the factors that control the distribution of methane oxidizers with assistance from Michelle Santana and Taylor Walton. Our thermodynamic analyses show that methane oxidation should yield abundant energy in many hot spring ecosystems and serpentinizing systems, but fieldwork shows that it is not always happening.

Mapping Metabolism throughout the Oceanic Crust

GEOPIG has a history of theoretical modeling of submarine hydrothermal systems, including high-temperature/pressure equilibria and lower temperature disequilibria that can drive abiotic organic synthesis or provide energy for geomicrobiomes. Tucker Ely has taken the effort global by using recent compilations of rock-composition data to simulate hydrothermal alteration of the entire mid-ocean ridge. The resulting global view of alteration sets the stage for assessing how chemolithotrophic metabolisms are supported differently throughout the hydrothermally active oceanic crust, and to start the process of extrapolating back in time to examine how hydrothermal systems have changed and influenced seawater compositions, alteration of the crust that ultimately gets subducted, and the distribution of life in the deep biosphere. Tucker’s work is currently supported by a graduate fellowship from C-DEBI. Peter Canovas collaborated with Tucker to evaluate chemical energy supplies in representative environments of the cold biosphere (<5°C), which represents an enormous volume of the inhabited Earth. Peter also plunged deeply into geobiochemical thermodynamics with a paper on the standard state properties of compounds involved in the citric acid cycle (Canovas & Shock, 2016)

Thermodynamics of Bioavailability

The form that metals and organic compounds take in solution can have dramatic effects on their bioavailability, or the ease with which they are harvested and consumed by microbes and other life forms. Apar Prasad is developing new methods to estimate thermodynamic properties of metal-organic complexes throughout conditions where aqueous fluids can contain life. He and Alta Howells are evaluating the consequences of metal-organic complex formation on the design of microbial growth media.

Habitability of Ocean Worlds

The selection by NASA of the Europa Clipper finds GEOPIG involved in our first space mission! Shock is a co-investigator on the MASPEX science team led by Hunter Waite from SouthWest Research Institute. As a result, we are actively engaged in envisioning how water-rock processes on Europa, Enceladus and other Ocean Worlds may be capable of supporting life, and pondering how data from the MASPEX mass spectrometer and other instruments on the Europa Clipper spacecraft will be used to test ideas about the life-supporting potential of Europa. There are thermodynamic problems to be solved, novel metabolisms to explore, and experiments on hydrothermal transformations of organic compounds to pursue. Melissa Sedler, Steven Glaser, James Leong, Peter Canovas and Tucker Ely are conducting computer calculations to explore the diversity of outcomes as fluids derived from comets react with rocks represented by meteorites.

Hydrothermal Organic Transformations

Exploration of Ocean Worlds will return exciting new data on the abundances of many volatile compounds that make up their icy surfaces or that are spewed out through plumes. A major challenge will be to explain what is happening inside Ocean Worlds from inventories of organic and other volatile compounds. We will be expected to do geology based on organic chemistry! But, it is still uncommon to be able to study volatile petrology. So, there is much to do, including developing a fundamental set of experimental observations of how organic compounds are transformed at hydrothermal conditions. Kristin Johnson and Kirt Robinson are characterizing the mechanisms of hydrothermal organic reactions with and without the presence of minerals in experiments supported by NASA’s Habitable Worlds program, and Charlene Estrada is transforming model compounds to complement her work on biosignature preservation in the fossil record.  Their work is part of the Hydrothermal Organic Geochemistry (HOG) research group that includes Kris Fecteau, as well as SMS grad students Christa Bockisch and Josh Nye, and faculty members Hilairy Hartnett, Ian Gould, Lynda Williams and Everett Shock. Related GEOPIG research funded through the Extreme Physics and Chemistry community of the Deep Carbon Observatory is focused on developing new equations of state to improve our abilities to predict thermodynamic properties of aqueous organic compounds at high temperatures and pressures.

The Other Planetary Fluid

The release of accretionary energy, together with heating by radioactive decay, warms ice-rich solar system bodies, leading to generation of fluids that are capable of rock alteration and organic transformations. Water is a familiar planetary fluid, but it is not alone. In many cases the abundance of carbon dioxide means that it can also be present as a planetary fluid. Steven Glaser is exploring how organic compound transformations in carbonic fluids may differ from aqueous alteration, with research assistance from David Gamez. This theoretical modeling project is supported by NASA’s Emerging Worlds program.

Revolutionizing Geochemical Modeling

Theoretical tools are extremely useful when testing ideas of how geochemical processes operate, and predicting their consequences, but are rarely designed so that they can interact. We are taking direct aim at this fundamental problem of computational roadblocks through the ENKI project funded by NSF. The project is led by Mark Ghiorso of OFM Research, and includes several collaborators around the country. Our portion of the project at GEOPIG is to select extant software for thermodynamic modeling with emphasis on aqueous solutions including systems containing organic molecules, and develop new approaches that rapidly enable new models. Tucker Ely is developing new computational tools that allow massive numbers of simultaneous calculations, and novel methods to visualize the results. We are working with Dimitri Sverjensky of Johns Hopkins on the design of algorithms for calibration of thermodynamic models of aqueous systems and on model interoperability of mass transfer and dynamical models. 

Publications

Some Recent Publications

Yang, Z., Williams, L.B., Hartnett, H.E., Gould, I.R., and Shock, E. L. (2017) Effects of iron-containing minerals on hydrothermal reactions of ketones. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta (in press).

Venturi, S., Tassi, F., Gould, I.R., Shock, E.L., Hartnett, H.E., Lorance, E.D., Bockisch, C., Fecteau, K., Capecchiacci, F., and Vaselli, O. (2017) Mineral-assisted production of benzene under hydrothermal conditions: insights from experimental studies on C6 cyclic hydrocarbons. Jour. Volc. Geothermal Res. (in press).

Colman, D.R., Poudel, S., Hamilton, T.L., Havig, J.R., Selensky, M.J., Shock, E.L., and Boyd, E.S. (2017) Oxygen and the evolution of thermoacidophiles. ISME Journal doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.162.

Pizzarello, S. and Shock, E. (2017) Carbonaceous chondrite meteorites: The chronicle of an evolutionary path between stars and life. Origins of Life and Evolution of the Biosphere 47, 249-260, doi:10.1007/s11084-016-9530-1.

Canovas, P.C. III, Hoehler T., and Shock, E.L. (2017) Geochemical bioenergetics during low-temperature serpentinization: An example from the Samail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman. Jour. Geophys. Res. - Biogeosciences 122, 1821-1847, doi:10.1002/2017JG003825.

Amenabar, M.J., Shock, E.L., Roden, E.E., Peters, J.W., and Boyd, E.S. (2017) Microbial substrate preference dictated by energy demand rather than supply. Nature Geoscience 10, 577-581. doi:10.1038/ngeo2978.

Chapman, E.J., Childers, D.L. and Shock, E.L. (2016) A thermodynamic analysis of ecosystem development in northern wetlands. Wetlands 36, 1143-1153.

Canovas, P.C. III and Shock, E.L. (2016) Geobiochemistry of metabolism: Standard state thermodynamic properties of the citric acid cycle. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 195, 293-322.

Colman, D.R., Feyhl-Buska, J., Robinson, K.J., Fecteau, K.M., Xu, H., Shock, E.L., and Boyd, E.S. (2016) Ecological differentiation in planktonic and sediment-associated chemotrophic microbial populations in Yellowstone hot springs. FEMS Microbiology Ecology 92, doi: 10.1093/femsec/fiw137.

Sharp, Z.D., Gibbons, JA., Maltsev, O., Atudorei V., Pack, A., Sengupta, S., Shock, E.L., and Knauth, L.P. (2016) A calibration of the triple oxygen isotope fractionation in the SiO2 - H2O system and applications to natural samples. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 186, 105-119.

Yang, Z., Hartnett, H.E., Shock, E.L. and Gould, I.R. (2015) Organic oxidations using geomimicry. J. Org. Chem. 80, 12159-12165.

Shock, E.L., and Boyd, E.S. (2015) Principles of geobiochemistry. Elements 11, 395-401.

Schubotz, F., Hays, L., Meyer-Dombard, D.R., Gillespie, A., Shock, E.L., and Summons, R.E. (2015) Stable isotope labeling confirms mixatrophic nature of streamer biofilm communities at alkaline hot springs.  Frontiers in Microbiology 6:42 10.3389/fmicb.2015.00042.

Meyer-Dombard, D.R., Woycheese, K.M., Yargıçoğlu, E.N., Cardace, D. Shock, E.L., Güleçal-Pektas, Y., and Temel, M. (2015) High pH microbial ecosystems in a newly discovered, ephemeral, serpentinizing fluid seep at Yanartaş (Chimaera), Turkey. Frontiers in Microbiology 5:723 10.3389/fmicb.2014.00723.

Neveu, M. Desch, S.J., Shock, E.L. and Glein, C.R. (2015) Prerequisites for explosive cryovolcanism on dwarf planet-class Kuiper belt objects. Icarus 246, 48-64.

Yang, Z., Lorance, E.D., Bockisch, C., Williams, L.B., Hartnett, H.E., Shock, E.L. and Gould, I.R. (2014) Hydrothermal photochemistry as a mechanistic tool in organic geochemistry: The chemistry of dibenzyl ketone. Journal of Organic Chemistry 79, 7861-7871.

Boyd, E.S., Hamilton, T.L., Havig J.R., Skidmore M. and Shock, E.L. (2014) Chemolithotrophic primary production in a subglacial ecosystem. Applied & Environmental Microbiology 80, 6146-6153.

Oiler, J., Shock, E., Hartnett, H., and Yu, H. (2014) Harsh environment sensor array-enabled hot spring mapping. IEEE Sensors Journal 14, 3418-3425.

Shipp, J., Gould, I.R., Shock, E.L., Williams, L.B., and Hartnett, H.E. (2014) Sphalerite is a geochemical catalyst for carbon-hydrogen bond activation. PNAS 111, 11642-11645. www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1324222111.

 

 

 

Research Activity
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
GLG 494Special Topics
SES 494Special Topics
CHM 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
SES 598Special Topics
GLG 598Special Topics
CHM 598Special Topics
SES 599Thesis
SES 792Research
SES 799Dissertation
Summer 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
SES 592Research
SES 692Research
SES 792Research
SES 799Dissertation
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 303Environmental Chemistry Lab
CHM 501Current Topics in Chemistry
AST 592Research
GLG 592Research
GLG 599Thesis
SES 692Research
AST 692Research
GLG 692Research
ELS 784Internship
AST 792Research
GLG 792Research
SES 792Research
SES 799Dissertation
GLG 799Dissertation
AST 799Dissertation
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 494Special Topics
GLG 494Special Topics
SES 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
SES 591Seminar
GLG 592Research
GLG 598Special Topics
CHM 598Special Topics
GLG 599Thesis
AST 692Research
SES 692Research
GLG 692Research
AST 792Research
GLG 792Research
SES 792Research
SES 799Dissertation
GLG 799Dissertation
AST 799Dissertation
Summer 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
GLG 592Research
AST 692Research
GLG 692Research
GLG 792Research
GLG 799Dissertation
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
GLG 592Research
AST 592Research
GLG 599Thesis
GLG 692Research
AST 692Research
ELS 784Internship
GLG 792Research
AST 792Research
GLG 799Dissertation
AST 799Dissertation
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
GLG 592Research
GLG 599Thesis
GLG 692Research
AST 692Research
GLG 792Research
AST 792Research
GLG 799Dissertation
AST 799Dissertation
Summer 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
GLG 592Research
GLG 692Research
GLG 792Research
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
GLG 494Special Topics
CHM 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
ELS 502Env Life Sci: Field Camp
AST 592Research
GLG 592Research
GLG 598Special Topics
CHM 598Special Topics
GLG 599Thesis
AST 692Research
GLG 692Research
ELS 784Internship
ELS 790Reading and Conference
GLG 792Research
AST 792Research
GLG 799Dissertation
AST 799Dissertation
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 302Environmental Chemistry
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
GLG 499Individualized Instruction
ELS 501Env Life Sci: Grand Challenge
BIO 598Special Topics
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 303Environmental Chemistry Lab
GLG 494Special Topics
CHM 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
GLG 499Individualized Instruction
CHM 598Special Topics
GLG 598Special Topics
ELS 784Internship
ELS 790Reading and Conference
Fall 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
GLG 494Special Topics
CHM 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
GLG 499Individualized Instruction
CHM 501Current Topics in Chemistry
GLG 598Special Topics
CHM 598Special Topics
Spring 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 303Environmental Chemistry Lab
GLG 490Topics in Geology
CHM 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
ELS 502Env Life Sci: Field Camp
GLG 592Research
GLG 598Special Topics
CHM 598Special Topics
GLG 599Thesis
GLG 692Research
GLG 792Research
GLG 799Dissertation
Honors / Awards

Designation of a hyperthermophilic archeon as Thermogladius shockii, 2011

Fellow, Geochemical Society and European Association for Geochemistry, 2009

Distinguished Geoscience Lecturer, Sandia National Laboratory, 2008

Steinbach Scholar, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, 2007

Fellow, American Geophysical Union, 2005

Hooker Distinguished Visiting Professor, McMaster University, 2004

Visiting Scholar, Western Michigan University, 2003

Outstanding Faculty Mentor Award, Graduate Student Senate, Washington University, 2000

C. Hewitt Dix Lecturer, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1999

Paul Gast Lecturer, European Association for Geochemistry, Goldschmidt Conference, Toulouse, 1998

Crosby Lecturer, MIT, 1994

Buffon Society Special Investigator Award, 1994

Service

Proponent of successful proposal for IODP Expedition 370: “The Temperature Limits of Life” (2016 - 2017)

Member of the Europa Project Science Group, and Co-I through MASPEX-Europa (2015 - present).

Center for Bio-Mediated and Bio-Inspired Geotechnics (CBBG, NSF-ERC, 2015 - present)

Project Steering Committee - Oman Drilling Project (2014 - present)

Scientific Committee, Extremophiles 2014, St Petersburg, Russia, Sept 2014

Scientific Committee, International Society for the Origins of Life 2014, Nara, Japan, July 2014

Co-organizer of session on “Windows Into to the Deep Subsurface Biosphere: Coupled Geochemical and Biological Investigations of Terrestrial Hot Spring Ecosystems” at Fall AGU (2013)

Science Definition Team for Europa Missions, NASA (2011-2014)

Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) science steering committee:            crust steering committee (2010-2014)

Co-organizer of session on “Organic Compound Transformations at High Pressures and            Temperatures” at Fall AGU (2011)

Co-organizer of session on “Omics Approaches to Geobiology” at Fall AGU (2010)

Co-organizer of session on ‘Hydrothermal Organic Geochemistry’ at Goldschmidt conference (2010)

    Organizer of session on ‘Energy Flow in Microbial Ecosystems’ at AbSciCon (2010)

    Co-organizer of session at Goldschmidt conference (2009)

    Co-organizer of session at AGU Joint Assembly (2009)

    Organizer and Host for ‘Hot Life in the Desert’ meetings (I-X), Arizona State University                (2006-2015)

    Instructor, International Geobiology Course, Colorado School of Mines (2008)

Member of NRC Committee on Origin and Evolution of Life (2007-2011)

Editorial Advisory Board of Elements (2005-2009)

Editor for AGU’s Biogeoscience Editor’s Choice Virtual Journal (2002 - 2005)

Co-organizer of special session at the American Society of Limnology & Oceanography meeting (2007)

Co-organizer of special Biogeosciences sessions at Fall AGU meeting (2002, 2003, 2004, 2005) 

Co-organizer of special biogeochemistry session at the American Chemical Society meeting (2005)

Member of Editorial Board of Earth and Planetary Science Letters (2001 - 2007)

Associate Editor of Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (1999 - 2005)

Organizing Committee: First American-German Conference on “Changing Earth and its Impact on Human Habitat” sponsored by NSF and DFG, Washington, DC. (2004)

Member of Editorial Board of Geofluids (1999 - 2003)

Co-organizer of Pardee Symposium: “The Future of Biogeochemistry: A Symposium in Honor of Harold Helgeson,” GSA Annual Meeting (2001)

Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, Space Studies Board, (COMPLEX) National Research Council (1997 - 2000)

Board of Directors, Geochemical Society (1998 - 2001)

Co-organizer of Pardee Symposium: “New Insights on Organic Metamorphism in the Earth,” GSA Annual Meeting (1999)

JOIDES Program Planning Group on the Deep Biosphere (1997 - 1999)

Joint Publications Committee, Geochemical Society & Meteoritical Society (1998 - 2000)

Organizer of first Geochemical Perspectives on Environmental Processes (GPEP) meeting, Washington University (1998)

Organizer of GPEP-2000: New Geochemical Tracers, Washington University (2000)

Organizing Committee for Conference on the Origin of the Earth and Moon (1997 - 1998)

Scientific Organizing Committee for Workshop on Early Mars: Geologic and Hydrologic Evolution, Physical and Chemical Environments, and the Implications for Life. Lunar        and Planetary Institute, Houston (1997)

Program Committee, Geochemical Society (1995 - 1997)

NASA-Exobiology Mars Strategy Committee (1994 - 1995)

Organizing Committee for 13th IUPAC Conference on Chemical Thermodynamics, Clermont-Ferrand, France (1994)

Member of SCOR Working Group 91 "Chemical Evolution and Origin of Life in Marine Hydrothermal Systems."  (1990 - 1992)

Graduate Faculties / Mentoring History

Graduate Students Supervised

 

Washington University

David C. Sassani         PhD 1992; Sandia National Lab

Marc Willis            MS 1993; California State University, Fullerton

Tom McCollom        PhD 1996; University of Colorado

Mitchell Schulte        PhD 1997; NASA Headquarters

Laura Wetzel            PhD 1997; Eckerd College

Laura Griffith            PhD 1998; Charleston Collegiate School

Panjai Prapaipong        PhD 2001; Arizona State University

Samantha Fernandes        MS 2002; consulting

D’Arcy Meyer-Dombard    PhD 2004; University of Illinois, Chicago

 

Arizona State University 

Jennifer Smith        Chemistry & Biochemistry            MS 2006 

            Dugway Data Services Team

Brandon McLean    School of Earth & Space Exploration        MS  2007

            Brown & Caldwell, Phoenix

Jeff Havig        School of Earth & Space Exploration     PhD 2009

            University of Cincinnati

Todd Windman    Chemistry & Biochemistry             PhD 2010

            ASU-SMS

Tracy Lund        School of Earth & Space Exploration     MS 2010

            Dept. of Health, State of Minnesota

Xiaoding Zhuo        Chemistry & Biochemistry             PhD 2010

            Environmental Policy Graduate School, UC Berkeley

Christopher Glein    School of Earth & Space Exploration     PhD 2012

                    Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX

Ziming Yang        Chemistry & Biochemistry            PhD 2014

            Dept. of Chemistry, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 

Kristopher Fecteau    School of Molecular Sciences        PhD 2016

            School of Earth & Space Exploration- ASU

Peter Canovas    School of Earth & Space Exploration     PhD 2016

Brian St. Clair         Environmental Life Sciences            PhD 2017

            Research scientist, Montana Tech

Grayson Boyer    School of Molecular Sciences        PhD current

Kirtland Robinson    School of Molecular Sciences        PhD current

Kristin Johnson    School of Molecular Sciences        PhD current

Apar Prasad        School of Molecular Sciences        PhD current

Alta Howells        School of Life Sciences: Microbiology    PhD current

James Leong        School of Earth & Space Exploration        PhD current

Tucker Ely        School of Earth & Space Exploration        PhD current

Steven Glaser        School of Earth & Space Exploration        PhD current

Joey Romero        School of Earth & Space Exploration        MS current

Melissa Sedler    School of Earth & Space Exploration        PhD current

 

Post-Docs Supervised

 

Washington University

Johnson Haas        Professor, Western Michigan University

David Sassani        Sandia National Lab, New Mexico

Mikhail Zolotov    Research Professor, Arizona State University

Jan Amend        Professor, University of Southern California

Andrey Plyasunov    Institute of Experimental Mineralogy, Russian Academy of Sciences

Melanie Holland    GeoTek, UK

Panjai Prapaipong    Research Scientist, Arizona State University

 

Arizona State University

Jenny Cox        Dept. of Chemistry, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada

Florian Schwandner    JPL, Pasadena, CA

Jeff Havig        Research faculty, University of Cincinnati

Jeffrey Dick        Wattanothaipayap School, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Jordan Okie        Research Professor, Arizona State University

Alysia Cox        Professor, Montana Tech

Charlene Estrada    SESE Exploration Post-Doc

Kristopher Fecteau    SESE

Work History

Professor, School of Earth and Space Exploration (formerly Department of Geological Sciences) and School of Molecular Sciences (formerly Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry), Arizona State University (since June 2002) 

Director, W. M. Keck Foundation Laboratory for Environmental Biogeochemistry, Arizona State University (since July 2002)

Co-director, Environmental Life Sciences Graduate Program, Arizona State University (2013-2017).

Chairman, Environmental Studies Program, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (1993-2001)

Professor, Associate Professor, Assistant Professor, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (1987-2002)

Research Assistant, U.C. Berkeley: theoretical research in high-pressure/temperature inorganic and organic aqueous solution chemistry, chemical interaction of minerals and organic compounds with aqueous solutions in geochemical processes (six years)

Physical Sciences Technician and Lab Supervisor, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (two years)