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Marion Le Gall

Instructor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 4501
Instructor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 4501
Biography: 

2021-present, instructor. School of Life Sciences and Barrett, the Honors College. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.

2020-2021, assistant research professor. Nutritional ecology of generalist herbivores. Global Locust Initiative. Social Insect Research Group and School of Sustainability, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.

2017-2020, postdoctoral research associate. Living with locusts: Ecophysiology of the Senegalese locust. Supervisor: Dr. Cease. Social Insect Research Group and Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.

2014-2016, postdoctoral researcher. Nutritional ecology of slug populations in Mid-Atlantic no-till grain fields. Supervisor: Dr. John Tooker. Department of Entomology, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, USA.

2009-2014, Ph.D. student. Diet-mixing in a generalist herbivore: trade-offs between nutrient and allelochemical regulation. Supervisor: Dr. Spencer Behmer. Insect Physiology & Behavior Research Group, Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.

2006-2008, M.S. student. The role of screening pigments in the eyes of a hematophagous insect. Supervisor: Pr. Claudio Lazzari. Tryptophan degradation and color change in crab-spiders. Supervisors: Dr. Mickaël Riou / Pr. Jérôme Casas. Research Institute for the Biology of Insect (IRBI), François Rabelais University, Tours, France.

Education: 

Ph.D., 2014. Entomology, Texas A&M University (USA)

M.S., 2008. Population Biology, with honors, François Rabelais University (France)

B.S., 2006. Integrative and Evolutionary Biology, with honors, University of Western Brittany and François Rabelais University (France)

Research Interests: 

I am a nutritional ecologist who works on generalist herbivores. My research seeks to understand how generalists solve the problem of balancing multiple and changing nutrient needs and how it affects their behavior and performance. I like to use a physiological approach (the Geometric Framework) as a window into mechanisms underlying ecological patterns and processes. The overarching goal of my research is to use these insights to help establish sustainable management programs for herbivorous pests.  

Summer 2022
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 494Special Topics
Spring 2022
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 194Special Topics
Fall 2021
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 194Special Topics