Integrated Search Menu

JP Hyatt

Profile photo
Assoc Professor
Faculty, DTPHX Campus, Mailcode 0320
Biography

JP Hyatt is an associate professor in the College of Integrative Sciences and Arts at Arizona State University. Hyatt received his doctorate from UCLA in in molecular, cellular, and integrative physiology. His area of interest includes skeletal muscle plasticity and adaptation to diet and exercise including adult myogenesis and satellite cells, shifts myosin heavy chain phenotypes, and changes that manifest during periods of physical inactivity (e.g., detraining). His recent work has centered on the dietary supplement, resveratrol, a naturally occurring plant compound associated with the benefits of red wine consumption.

Prior to his arrival at ASU (2016), Hyatt served as faculty at Georgetown University (2004–16) in the Department of Human Science preparing students for careers in science and health-related fields through teaching and by engaging undergraduates in laboratory research.

At ASU, Hyatt teaches anatomy and physiology courses at the Downtown Phoenix campus (BIO 160 and BIO 201) and conducts exercise physiology-related research at the Tempe campus in the P.R.I.M.E.D (Physiological Research In Muscle, Exercise, and Diet) Laboratory. Hyatt also holds a secondary research interest in science education and pedagogy and co-directs the "GIE: Global STEM Education: Science Teaching Experience in Costa Rica" at ASU. He is a member of the American Physiological Society, American College of Sports Medicine, and the Sigma Xi Society.

Education

Ph.D. Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Physiology, University of California-Los Angeles 2002

Videos
From Feb. 2018, this short video demonstrates how technology is used at ASU Downtown to enhance the anatomy and physiology laboratory experience for students.
Publications

Hyatt JPK, Bienenstock EJ, Tilan JU. A student guide to proofreading and writing in science. Advances in Physiology Education 41: 324-331, 2017. doi:10.1152/advan.00004.2017.

Hyatt JPK, Nguyen L, Hall AE, Huber AM, Kocan JC, Mattison JA, de Cabo R, LaRocque JR, Talmadge RJ. Muscle-specific myosin heavy chain shifts in response to a long-term high fat / high sugar diet and resveratrol treatment in nonhuman primates. Frontiers in Physiology: Striated Muscle Physiology 7: 77, 2016. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2016.00077

Summer 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 160Intro. to Anatomy & Physiology
Spring 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 160Intro. to Anatomy & Physiology
BIO 201Human Anatomy/Physiology I
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
ABS 493Honors Thesis
BIO 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 160Intro. to Anatomy & Physiology
BIO 201Human Anatomy/Physiology I
ABS 492Honors Directed Study
ABS 493Honors Thesis
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 201Human Anatomy/Physiology I
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 201Human Anatomy/Physiology I
BIO 494Special Topics
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 201Human Anatomy/Physiology I
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 201Human Anatomy/Physiology I
Expertise Areas