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Dmitry Matyushov

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Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 1504
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 1604
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 1604
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 1604
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 1504
Biography

Dmitry Matyushov is a Professor of Physics and Chemistry at Arizona State University. His research interests are in theoretical and computational condensed matter physics, physical chemistry, and biophysics. After receiving his undergraduate degree in 1986 from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Phystech), he studied at Kiev State University (Ukraine) and the Ukrainian Academy of Science, receiving his Ph.D. in theoretical physics in 1989 with the thesis on path integrals for stochastic processes. He worked as a staff scientist at the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences and in 1993 was awarded a postdoctoral (Lise Meitner) fellowship from the Austrian Science Foundation. After spending 3 years in Vienna, also in the position of an invited professor, he moved to Fort Collins (CO) to join the group of Prof Branka Ladanyi as a postdoctoral fellow. After another postdoc with Prof Greg Voth at the University of Utah, he joined the faculty of Arizona State University in 2000. His research in Arizona included spectroscopy, solvation, phase and glass transitions, complex fluids, electron transfer, dielectric spectroscopy, and bioenergetics (mechanisms of photosynthesis and respiration). Current interests include protein dynamics, electrostatics of the protein-water interface, and problems related to ergodicity breaking and non equilibrium ensembles in biology and enzyme catalysis.

Education

Ph.D., Kiev's State University (Ukraine), 1989

Research Interests

Energy in biology. We are interested in understanding of how electrons are transferred in biology and molecular assemblies. Biology’s energy chains rely on trans-membrane transfer of redox or photon energy from electron donating molecules and photoexcited states to catalytic sites where the energy is stored in chemical bonds. We are working on understanding the kinetics and energetics of elementary electron transfer events with the goal of formulating general principles of energetic efficiency of charge-transfer chains. Non-equilibrium ensembles and ergodicity breaking turn out to be essential parts of biology’s efficiency. Our research strategy combines the use of computer simulations of realistic systems with the development of theoretical models directly applicable to interpreting the experiment.

Protein-water interface. The ability of proteins to perform biological function is linked to electrostatics of proteins themselves and of their hydration shells. Textbooks assign low dielectric constant to proteins, comparable to that of chloroform. Large-scale computer simulations show that this is only partially true. Proteins have a broad distribution of relaxation times and, depending on the process of interest, can be either non-polar or very polar. We formulate models of water at the surface of the protein and connect them to experimental observations such as absorption of electromagnetic radiation by protein solutions.

Theory of polar liquids and dielectrics. We study different aspects of polar liquids in the bulk and in interfaces. Our interests include the statistical mechanics of the liquid phase and dielectric response of polarized interfaces.  We develop models of the polar response based on liquid-state theories and test them by numerical atomistic simulations.

Electro-elastic dynamics of proteins. We develop models of large-scale protein dynamics influenced by protein’s elasticity and charge distribution. 

Publications

"Configurational entropy of polar glass formers and the effect of electric field on glass transition", Dmitry V. Matyushov, J. Chem. Phys145 034504 (2016)

"Dipolar Nanodomains in Protein Hydration Shells," Daniel R. Martin and Dmitry V. Matyushov, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6 407-412 (2015)

"Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?," D. V. Matyushov, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 27 473001 (2015)

"Protein electron transfer: Dynamics and statistics," D. V. Matyushov, J. Chem. Phys. 139 025102 (2013)

"Solvated dissipative electro-elastic network model of hydrated proteins," Daniel R. Martin and Dmitry V. Matyushov, J. Chem. Phys. 137 165101 (2012)

"Protein-water electrostatics and principles of bioenergetics," David N. LeBard and Dmitry V. Matyushov, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12 15335-15348 (2010)

Research Activity

 

Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 345Physical Chemistry I
PHY 792Research
PHY 795Continuing Registration
Summer 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 792Research
PHY 795Continuing Registration
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 473From Molecules to Cells
PHY 792Research
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 441Statistical/Thermal Physics
PHY 792Research
PHY 795Continuing Registration
Summer 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 792Research
PHY 795Continuing Registration
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 792Research
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 571Quantum Physics
NAN 571Quantum Physics
MSE 571Quantum Physics
PHY 792Research
Summer 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 792Research
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 792Research
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 545Quantum Chemistry
PHY 571Quantum Physics
MSE 571Quantum Physics
NAN 571Quantum Physics
Summer 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 792Research
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 792Research
Fall 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
NAN 571Quantum Physics
PHY 571Quantum Physics
PHY 792Research
Summer 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
PHY 792Research
Spring 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
CHM 341Elementary Physical Chemistry
Presentations
  • D. V. Matyushov. Photosynthetic and Protein Electron Transfer: Is Biology (Thermo) Dynamic?. Department Seminar, U of Calgary (Dec 2014).
  • D. V. Matyushov. What can biology teach us about the condensed phase?. Dept. of Chemistry Seminar, U of South Florida (Oct 2014).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Protein Electron Transfer: Is biology (thermo)dynamic?. Gordon Research Conference "Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions" (Aug 2014).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Structure and dynamics of protein hydration shells. Gordon Research Conference "Water and Aqueous Solutions" (Aug 2014).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Electrostatics of the protein-water interface. Protein Electrostatics", Lisbon, on 8-11 July 2014 (http://protelec20.org) (Jul 2014).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Protein Electron Transfer. 2014 International Symposium on Laser and Computational Biophysics, Shanghai, China (Jun 2014).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Structure and dynamics of hydration shells (of proteins). Telluride workshop "Hydrophobicity: From Theory, Simulation, to Experiment" (Jun 2014).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Charge Transport in Bacterial Photosynthesis. ACS National Meeting, Dallas (Mar 2014).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Protein electron transfer. Theoretical seminar, U. Urbana-Champaign (Nov 2013).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Protein-water interface and natural photosynthesis. Seminar at PNNL (Nov 2013).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Is nature (thermo)dynamic?. Biophysics seminar, Purdue U (Oct 2013).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Electrostatics of the protein-water interface. ACS National Meeting (Sep 2013).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Depolarized light scattering by dipeptide solutions. Telluride conference ``Nonequilibrium Phenomena, Nonadiabatic Dynamics and Spectroscopy'' (Jul 2013).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Dielectric response of hydrated proteins. APS March Meeting (Mar 2013).
  • D. V. Matyushov. Time or energy? Biology's function through relaxation, fluctuations, and nonergodicity (to rule them all). Physics seminar, Ohio State University (Jan 2013).