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William Hedberg

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Assistant Professor, Japanese
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 0202
Affiliated Faculty
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 0202
Biography

William Hedberg's primary research focus is the literature and culture of early modern Japan, and his current project centers on the reception of late imperial Chinese fiction during the Edo and Meiji periods (17th-20th c.). This project brings together long-standing interests in Sino-Japanese literary contact, the formation of national literatures, and the history of translation in East Asia. Hedberg's first book, titled The Japanese Discovery of Chinese Fiction: The Water Margin and the Making of a National Canon was published by Columbia University Press in the fall of 2019. Other research interests include travel literature, Japanese Sinology, and the motif of utopia in early modern and modern East Asia. Hedberg's research has been published in the Journal of Japanese Studies, Japan Forum, East Asian Publishing and Society, The International Journal of Asian Studies, and Sino-Japanese Studies.

Education
  • Ph.D. East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University 2012
  • B.A. East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Kansas 2005
Research Interests

Sino-Japanese literary and cultural relations (esp. early modern period)

Japanese Sinology

Travel literature

Translation studies

Premodern fiction criticism in East Asia

Publications

"Chinese Fiction as a 'Signal Bell of the Revolution' and the Transregional Birth of an Author" (forthcoming, East Asian Publishing and Society)

"Paradise Lost and Regained: The Passion of Chinese Studies in Meiji-Period Japan" Sino-Japanese Studies, Vol. 26 (2019), pp. 1-30

“Akutagawa Ryūnosuke’s Uncanny Travels in Republican-Era China” Japan Forum 29.2 (June 2017), pp. 236-256.

“Separating the Word and the Way:  Suyama Nantō’s Chūgi Suikodenkai and Edo-Period Vernacular Philology” The Journal of Japanese Studies 41.2 (2015), pp. 343-367.

“Reclaiming the Margins: Seita Tansō’s Suikoden hihyōkai and the Poetics of Cross-Cultural Influence” International Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 12.2 (2015), pp. 193-215.

“The Chinese Afterlives of Coxinga and the Forty-Seven Faithful Rōnin of Akō:  Japanese Puppet Theatre and Cultural Encounter in Edo-Period Nagasaki” Sino-Japanese Studies, Vol. 20 (2013), pp. 34-65.

Research Activity

American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Fellowship Program

Mellon Fellowship for Assistant Professors, Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton

Social Science Research Council Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellowship

Japan Foundation Institutional Project Support Program

Participant in US Department of Education Title VI UISFL grant (“Asia Mediated”)

 

 

Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
JPN 414Intro to Classical Japanese
SLC 551Global Approaches to Trans
JPN 590Reading and Conference
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
JPN 415Advanced Classical Japanese
SLC 421Japanese Lit in Translation
JPN 484Internship
SLC 598Special Topics
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
JPN 414Intro to Classical Japanese
SLC 421Japanese Lit in Translation
JPN 492Honors Directed Study
SLC 598Special Topics
Summer 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
JPN 484Internship
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
SLC 421Japanese Lit in Translation
JPN 484Internship
JPN 485Literary Translation
JPN 585Adv Problems of Translation
SLC 598Special Topics
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
JPN 414Intro to Classical Japanese
SLC 421Japanese Lit in Translation
SLC 598Special Topics