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Marianne Moore

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Asst Professor
Faculty, POLY Campus, Mailcode 2780
Asst Professor
Faculty, POLY Campus, Mailcode 2780
Biography: 

Marianne Moore received a bachelor's degree in 2002 from the Evergreen State College and earned her doctorate in ecology, behavior and evolution from Boston University (2011), under the direction of Thomas Kunz. Her dissertation utilized a large field-based study to describe the immune responses of little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) affected by the emergent bat fungal disease white-nose syndrome (WNS). Other graduate work focused on the ecology of rabies in big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and the immunological effects of mercury contamination on little brown myotis. Postdoctoral research with DeeAnn Reeder at Bucknell University provided Moore with experience experimentally testing species-specific differences in physiological responses to infection by the WNS causative agent, Pseudogymnoascus destructans. In 2013, Moore was awarded a National Institutes of Health-funded postdoctoral fellowship through the Stony Brook University (NY-CAPS) Institutional Research and Career Development Award (IRACDA). As an IRACDA postdoctoral scholar, Moore received formal training in pedagogy. She also expanded her research experiences to studying the evolution of immune system genes and describing genetic correlates of resistance to WNS using high throughput sequencing techniques, specifically proteomics. In 2015, Moore joined Arizona State University on the Polytechnic campus as an assistant professor in animal ecology. In Arizona, Moore has launched a multi-year field-based study to describe hibernation traits in desert southwest bats to help predict potential future impacts of WNS on these populations.

Education: 
  • Ph.D. Ecology, Behavior and Evolution, Boston University 2011
  • B.S. Evergreen State College 2002
Research Group: 

Marianne Moore uses ecological, physiological, immunological, and evolutionary tools to examine relationships between wildlife and their pathogens. Funded by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Moore and partners are describing winter ecology, behavior and physiology of desert southwest bats to predict their susceptibility to the emergent fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS). This field-based research involves passive methods of monitoring bats, including internal cave surveys, digital photography, acoustic monitoring, environmental monitoring, and thermal imaging. Moore and collaborators are also describing characteristics of surviving bat populations in affected areas to identify traits of resistance and susceptibility in skin, the primary tissue affected by WNS. This research utilizes proteomics, bioinformatics, population genetics and functional assays to uncover mechanisms underlying resistance to WNS and to investigate potential methods of control. Moore is also conducting pilot studies to evaluate relationships between nutrition and immunity with the goal of launching an additional long-term research program in ecological and evolutionary immunology.

Fall 2021
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 360Animal Physiology
ABS 417Comparative Immunology
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
BIO 492Honors Directed Study
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
ABS 590Reading and Conference
ABS 592Research
ABS 593Applied Project
Spring 2021
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 360Animal Physiology
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
BIO 493Honors Thesis
ABS 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
ABS 599Thesis
Fall 2020
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 360Animal Physiology
ABS 417Comparative Immunology
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
BIO 492Honors Directed Study
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
ABS 593Applied Project
Spring 2020
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 360Animal Physiology
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
BIO 493Honors Thesis
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
ABS 599Thesis
Fall 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 360Animal Physiology
ABS 417Comparative Immunology
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
BIO 492Honors Directed Study
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
ABS 593Applied Project
Spring 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 360Animal Physiology
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
BIO 492Honors Directed Study
ABS 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
ABS 599Thesis
Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 360Animal Physiology
ABS 467Comparative Immunology
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 360Animal Physiology
ABS 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 360Animal Physiology
ABS 394Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 360Animal Physiology
ABS 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research