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Tess Neal

Assistant Professor
Faculty, WEST Campus, Mailcode 3051
Senior Sustainability Scientist
Faculty, WEST Campus, Mailcode 3051
Lincoln Fellow
Faculty, WEST Campus, Mailcode 3051
Biography

Tess Neal is an Assistant Professor of Psychology in ASU's New College of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences and is a founding faculty member of ASU's new Program on Law and Behavioral Science (http://lawpsych.asu.edu/).  She is both a researcher and a licensed psychologist (State of Arizona #4630 and State of Nebraska #844). 

Dr. Neal's research is funded by muliple grants from the National Science Foundation and other sources, and she has published one edited book and nearly three dozen peer-reviewed publications in such journals as PLOS ONEPsychology, Public Policy, and Law; and Criminal Justice and Behavior.  She is the recipient of the 2016 Saleem Shah Award for Early Career Excellence in Psychology and Law, co-awarded by the American Psychology-Law Society and the American Academy of Forensic Psychology.  She was named a 2016 "Rising Star" by the Association for Psychological Science, a designation that recognizes outstanding psychological scientists in the earliest stages of their research career post-PhD "whose innovative work has already advanced the field and signals great potential for their continued contributions."

She directs the Clinical and Legal Judgment Lab at ASU: http://psych-law.lab.asu.edu 

Education

Ph.D. Clinical Psychology (with minors in psychology-law and statistics) - The University of Alabama (2012)  

Clinical-Forensic Postdoctoral Residency - University of Massachusetts Medical School (2012-2013)

National Science Foundation Interdisciplinary Postdoctoral Research Fellowship - University of Nebraska (2013-2015) 

Videos
Interview about Dr. Neal's research
Research Interests

Dr. Neal's research interests focus on human inference and decision making, especially by experts.  The core questions motivating her research are, “How do people reason with and integrate information to make inferences and judgments?” and “What affects people’s ability to do this well?” Consistent with the "use-inspired basic research" of Stokes' (1997) quadrant of basic and applied research, Dr. Neal studies these basic science questions in applied settings (e.g., the legal system, the scientific enterprise, healthcare and mental health systems, government) with the twin goals of discovering new understandings about how humans make decisions while also making concrete contributions to real-world problems.

Research Group

Clinical and Legal Judgment Lab: http://psych-law.lab.asu.edu/

ASU Program on Law and Behavioral Science: http://lawpsych.asu.edu/

Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics: https://lincolncenter.asu.edu/lincoln-center-applied-ethics 

 

Publications

PEER-REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. PytlikZillig, L.M., Kimbrough, C.D., Shockley, E., Neal, T.M.S., Herian, M.N., Hamm, J.A., Bornstein, B.H., & Tomkins, A. (2017).  A longitudinal and experimental study of the impact of knowledge on the bases of institutional trust. PLOS ONE, 12, e0175387. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175387.
  2. Bouwmeester, S, Verkoeijen, P.,….Neal, T.M.S. & Warner, M…. (2017). Registered replication report: Rand, Greene, & Nowak (2012).  Perspectives on Psychological Science, 12, 527-542. doi: 10.1177/1745691617693624 
  3. PytlikZillig, L.M., Hamm, J.A., Shockley, E., Herian, M., Neal, T.M.S., Kimbrough, C., Tomkins, A.J., Bornstein, B.H. (2016). The dimensionality of trust-relevant constructs in four institutional domains: Results from confirmatory factor analyses.  Journal of Trust Research, 6, 111-150. doi:10.1080/21515581.2016.1151359
  4. Neal, T.M.S. (2016). Are forensic experts already biased before adversarial legal parties hire them?  PLOS ONE, 11, e0154434. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0154434.
  5. PytlikZillig, L.M., Hamm, J.A., Shockley, E., Herian, M., Neal, T.M.S., Kimbrough, C., Tomkins, A.J., Bornstein, B.H., (in press). The dimensionality of trust-relevant constructs in four institutional domains: Results from confirmatory factor analyses.  Journal of Trust Research. doi:10.1080/21515581.2016.1151359
  6. Neal, T.M.S. & Brodsky, S.L. (2016). Forensic psychologists’ perceptions of bias and potential correction strategies in forensic mental health evaluations.  Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 22, 58-76. doi: 10.1037/law0000077
  7. Neal, T.M.S., Miller, S.L., & Shealy, R.C. (2015). A field study of a comprehensive violence risk assessment battery.  Criminal Justice & Behavior, 42, 952-968.  doi: 10.1177/0093854815572252
  8. Parrott, C.T., Neal, T.M.S., Wilson J.K., & Brodsky, S.L. (2015). Differences in expert witness knowledge: Do mock jurors notice and does it matter? Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, 43, 69-81.
  9. Neal, T.M.S. (2014). Women as expert witnesses: A review of the literature. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 32, 164-179. doi: 10.1002/bsl.2113
  10. Neal, T.M.S. & Grisso, T. (2014). Assessment practices and expert judgment methods in forensic psychology and psychiatry: An International Snapshot.  Criminal Justice and Behavior, 41, 1406-1421. doi: 10.1177/0093854814548449.
  11. Neal, T.M.S. & Grisso, T. (2014).  The cognitive underpinnings of bias in forensic mental health evaluations. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 20, 200-211. doi:10.1037/a0035824
  12. Candilis, P. & Neal, T.M.S. (2014). Not just welfare over justice: Ethics in forensic consultation. Legal and Criminological Psychology, 19, 19-29. doi: 10.1111/lcrp.12038
  13. Neal, T.M.S. & Brodsky, S.L. (2014). Occupational socialization’s role in forensic psychologists’ objectivity. Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 14, 24-44. doi: 10.1080/15228932.2013.863054
  14. Brodsky, S.L., Neal, T.M.S., & Jones, M.A. (2013).  A reasoned argument against banning psychologists’ involvement in death penalty cases.  Ethics & Behavior, 23, 62-66. doi:10.1080/10508422.2013.757954
  15. Cramer, R.J., DeCoster, J., Neal, T.M.S., & Brodsky, S.L. (2013). The Observed Witness Efficacy Scale: A measurement of effective testimony skills. Journal of Applied Social Psych., 43, 1691-1703. doi: 10.1111/jasp.12124
  16. Girvan, E., Cramer, R.J., Titcomb, C., Neal, T.M.S., & Brodsky, S.L. (2013). The propriety of preemptory challenges for perceived personality traits.  Law & Psychology Review, 37, 49-82.
  17. Neal, T.M.S., Cramer, R.J., Ziemke, M.H., & Brodsky, S.L. (2013).  Online searches for jury selection. Criminal Law Bulletin, 49, 305-318.
  18. Neal, T.M.S. & Nagle, J.E. (2013).  Measuring abuse sequelae: Validating and extending the Trauma Symptom Checklist-40.  Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment, & Trauma, 22, 231-247. doi: 10.1080/10926771.2013.764953
  19. Brodsky, S.L., Wilson, J.K., & Neal, T.M.S. (2013). Refusing and withdrawing from forensic evaluations.  Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 13, 14-26. doi: 10.1080/15228932.2013.746908
  20. Neal, T.M.S., Guadagno, R.E., Eno, C.A., & Brodsky, S.L. (2012). Warmth and competence on the witness stand: Implications for credibility of male and female expert witnesses. Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, 40, 488-497.
  21. Neal, T.M.S., Christiansen, A., Bornstein, B.H., & Robicheaux, T. (2012). The effects of mock jurors’ beliefs about eyewitness performance on trial judgments.  Psychology, Crime, & Law, 18, 49-64. doi: 10.1080/1068316X.2011.587815
  22. Neal, T.M.S. & Sellbom, M. (2012). Examining the factor structure of the Hare Self-Report Psychopathy Scale. Journal of Personality Assessment, 94, 244-253. doi:10.1080/00223891.2011.648294
  23. Kelly, J.O., Brodsky, S.L., Neal, T.M.S., & Cramer, R.J. (2011). Prosecutor pre-trial attitudes and plea-bargain behavior toward veterans with PTSD. Psychological Services, 8, 319-331. doi: 10.1037/a0025330
  24. Barnett, M.E., Brodsky, S.L., & Neal, T.M.S. (2011). Mitigation evaluations: A survey of current practices. Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 11, 21-41. doi: 10.1080/15228932.2011.521724
  25. Cramer, R.J., Neal, T.M.S., DeCoster, J., & Brodsky, S.L. (2010).  Witness self-efficacy: Development and validation of the construct.  Behavioral Sciences & the Law, 28, 784-800. doi: 10.1002/bsl.952
  26. Neal, T.M.S. (2010).  Choosing the lesser of two evils: A framework for considering the ethics of competence for execution evaluations. Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 10, 145-157. doi: 10.1080/15228930903446724
  27. Neal, T.M.S. & Clements, C.B. (2010). Prison rape and psychological sequelae: A call for research. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 16, 284-299. doi: 10.1037/a0019448
  28. Neal, T.M.S., Lichtenstein, B., & Brodsky, S.L. (2010).  Clinical implications of stigma in HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections.  International Journal of STDs & AIDS, 21, 158-160. doi:10.1258/ijsa.2008.008445
  29. Brodsky, S.L., Neal, T.M.S., Cramer, R.J., & Ziemke, M.H. (2009).  Credibility in the courtroom: How likeable should an expert witness be?  Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, 37, 525-532. 
  30. Cramer, R.J., Neal, T.M.S., & Brodsky, S.L. (2009).  Self-efficacy and confidence: Theoretical distinctions and implications for trial consultation.  Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 61, 319-334. doi: 10.1037/a0017310   
  31. Neal, T.M.S. & Brodsky, S.L. (2008).  Expert witness credibility as a function of eye contact behavior and gender.  Criminal Justice and Behavior, 35, 1515-1526. doi: 10.1177/0093854808325405

BOOKS

  1. Shockley, E., Neal, T.M.S., & PytlikZillig, L.M., & Bornstein, B.H. (Eds.) (2016). Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Trust: Towards Theoretical and Methodological Integration. New York: Springer.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  1. Neal, T.M.S., Hight, M., Howatt, B.C., & Hamza, C. (in press). The cognitive and social psychological bases of bias in forensic mental health judgments. In M.K. Miller & B.H. Bornstein (Eds). Advances in Psychology and Law: Volume 3. New York: Springer.
  2. Clements, C. & Neal, T.M.S. (in press). Research in criminal psychology.  In R.D. Morgan (Ed.) The SAGE Encyclopedia of Criminal Psychology.  Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE. 
  3. Neal, T.M.S. (2017). Identifying the forensic psychologist role. In G. Pirelli, R. Beattey, & P. Zapf (Eds.), The Ethical Practice of Forensic Psychology: A Casebook (1-17).  New York: Oxford University Press.
  4. Herian, M.N. & Neal, T.M.S. (2016). Trust as a multilevel phenomenon: Implications for improved integrative science in trust research. In E. Shockley, T.M.S. Neal, L.M. PytlikZillig, & B.H. Bornstein (Eds.), Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Trust: Towards Theoretical and Methodological Integration (117-130). New York: Springer.
  5. Neal, T.M.S., PytlikZillig, L.M., Bornstein, B.H., & Shockley, E. (2016). Inspiring and advancing the many-disciplined study of institutional trust. In E. Shockley, T.M.S. Neal, L.M. PytlikZillig, & B.H. Bornstein (Eds.), Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Trust: Towards Theoretical and Methodological Integration (1-16). NY: Springer.
  6. Neal, T.M.S., Shockley, E., & Schilke, O. (2016). The “dark side” of institutional trust.  In E. Shockley, T.M.S. Neal, L.M. PytlikZillig, & B.H. Bornstein (Eds.), Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Trust: Towards Theoretical and Methodological Integration (177-192). NY: Springer.
  7. Brodsky, S.L. & Neal, T.M.S. (2013).  Preparing and giving expert testimony.  In Koocher, G.P., Norcross, J.C. & Greene, B.A. (Eds.) Psychologist’s Desk Reference: Third Edition (604-608). New York: Oxford University Press. 
Research Activity

Grants Support:

External Grants Received

National Science Foundation.  "Expert Bias: Perceptions, Misperceptions, and Their Implications" (Co-PI: Emily Pronin, Princeton Univ.) (#SES-LSS-1655011).  $279,280.  05/2017-04/2020

American Psychology-Law Society, & the Society for the Psych. Study of Social Issues.  "An Experimental Study of Bias in Psychologists’ Diagnostic Reasoning" (Note: ASU partially matched these grant-in-aid funds).  $8,850.  11/2016 – 11/2017

Association for Psychological Science.  Perspectives on Psychological Science Registered Replication Project for Rand et al. (2012).  $1,209.  07/2015-05/2016

Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues.  "To Approach Good Choices or To Avoid Bad Choices?  How Approach and Avoidance ‘Nudge’ Policies affect Public Trust and Policy Support."  $1,980.  01/2015-01/2016

National Science Foundation. "Institutional Trust and Confidence Workshop" (#SES-LSS-1353980). $47,343. 01/2014-01/2015

National Science Foundation.  "The Objectivity Demand: Experiences & Behaviors of Psychologists in Capital Case Evaluations" (DDRIG, SES-LSS-1022849).  $14,997.  08/2010-08/2011.

 

Internal Grants Received

ASU Knowledge Enterprise Development (KED) and New College.  New College Scholarship, Research, and Creative Activities Seed Grant: How and Why are Experts’ Judgments Biased?  $4,999.  07/2017-06/2018

ASU Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics. "Expert Bias: Perceptions, Misperceptions, and Their Ethical Implications." $4,439.  07/2017-06/2018

ASU Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics.  "Experts & Ethics: A Conceptual and Empirical Research Proposal with Four Deliverables."  $5,531.  07/2016-06/2017

ASU New College Undergraduate Intensive Research Experience.  NCUIRE Team Awards, Research Assistant Awards (multiple semesters, multiple students).  $9,875 total.  01/2016 - 12/2017.

Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
PSY 492Honors Directed Study
PSY 493Honors Thesis
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
PSY 592Research
PSY 599Thesis
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 368Forensic Psychology
PSY 492Honors Directed Study
PSY 493Honors Thesis
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
PSY 592Research
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
PSY 492Honors Directed Study
PSY 494Special Topics
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
PSY 592Research
PSY 598Special Topics
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
PSY 494Special Topics
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 366Abnormal Psychology
PSY 399Supervised Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction