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Michael Barton

Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Senior Sustainability Scientist
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Biography: 

Michael Barton is a geoarchaeologist and anthropologist whose research centers on the dynamics of socioecological systems, expecially in the context of hunter/gatherers and small-scale agricultural societies. His expertise includes Quaternary landscapes, geospatial technologies, computational modeling, complex systems science, evolutionary theory, and lithic technology. 

Geographically, his research is focused primarily in the Mediterranean, western Eurasia more broadly, and western North America

Barton is Director of the interdisciplinary Center for Social Dynamics and Complexity, and heads the Graduate Faculty in Complex Adaptive System Science.

Fax: 
480-965-7671
Education: 
  • Ph.D. Anthropology; minor: Geosciences, University of Arizona
  • M.A. Anthropology; minor: Geosciences, University of Arizona
  • B.A. Anthropology, University of Kansas
Research Interests: 

Barton's interests center around long-term human ecology and landscape dynamics with ongoing projects in the Mediterranean (late Pleistocene through mid-Holocene) and American Southwest (Holocene-Archaic). He has done fieldwork in Spain, Bosnia, and various locales in North America and has expertise in hunter/gatherer and early farming societies, geoarchaeology, lithic technology, and evolutionary theory, with an emphasis on human/environmental interaction, landscape dynamics, and techno-economic change. Quantitative methods, increasingly critical to archaeological research and social science in general, and are an important focus of his research, especially emphasizing computational modeling, spatial technologies (including GIS and remote sensing), data science, and visualization.

Barton is a member of the open source GRASS GIS international development team that is making cutting edge spatial technologies available to researchers and students around the world. 

The Mediterranean Landscape Dynamics project, which Barton directs, combines computational modeling and interdisciplinary fielswork to study the emergence of coupled human and natural landscapes, and  long-term interactions of agricultural land-use practices and landscape change in the ancient Mediterranean, with support from the National Science Biocomplexity in the Environment and Coupled Natural and Human Systems programs.

He also directs the CoMSES Network and CoMSES CoRe, an international research network and NSF Big Data Spoke facility to promote open science, knowledge sharing, reproducibility, and best practices in emerging cybertools in the socio-ecological sciences.

Barton also co-directs collaborative projects with the National Center for Atmospheric Research. One of these projects is building a computational tool set for integrating global climate models and global socio-economic models. A goal is to better assess the socio-economic impacts of climate change over the next 30 years. A second collaboration brings together storm modeling, social science and social media data, and computational modeling of social information networks to study the dissemination of hurricane warning in today's information-rich society, and the ways in which people make crucial decisions about risk.

Publications: 

110. P. Schlosser et al., “COVID-19: The Ultimate Stress Test for Our Global Futures,” Medium, Mar. 27, 2020.

109. F. Riede et al., “Cultural taxonomies in the Paleolithic—Old questions, novel perspectives,” Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 49–52, Mar. 2020, doi: 10.1002/evan.21819.

108. M. Chen et al., “Position paper: Open web-distributed integrated geographic modelling and simulation to enable broader participation and applications,” Earth-Science Reviews, vol. 207, p. 103223, Aug. 2020, doi: 10.1016/j.earscirev.2020.103223.

107. C. M. Barton et al., “Call for transparency of COVID-19 models,” Science, vol. 368, no. 6490, pp. 482–483, May 2020, doi: 10.1126/science.abb8637.

106. J.-A. Atkinson et al., “Complex systems modelling can guide policy and practice,” Croakey, Jun. 11, 2020.

105. J. Watts, R. E. Morss, C. M. Barton, and J. L. Demuth, “Conceptualizing and implementing an agent-based model of information flow and decision making during hurricane threats,” Environmental Modelling & Software, vol. 122, p. 104524, Dec. 2019, doi: 10.1016/j.envsoft.2019.104524.

104. L. Stephens et al., “Archaeological assessment reveals Earth’s early transformation through land use,” Science, vol. 365, no. 6456, pp. 897–902, Aug. 2019, doi: 10.1126/science.aax1192.

103. A. Cortell-Nicolau, O. García-Puchol, C. M. Barton, A. Diez-Castillo, and S. Pardo-Gordó, “Wandering through the Mesolithic. An archaeostatistical approach to explore the mobility patterns in eastern Iberia,” Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, vol. 26, p. 101892, Aug. 2019, doi: 10.1016/j.jasrep.2019.101892.

102. G. A. Clark, C. M. Barton, and L. G. Straus, “Landscapes, Climate Change & Forager Mobility in the Upper Paleolithic of Northern Spain,” Quaternary International, vol. 515, pp. 176–187, 2019, doi: 10.1016/j.quaint.2018.04.037.

101. G. Snitker, A. D. Castillo, C. M. Barton, J. B. Aubán, O. G. Puchol, and S. Pardo-Gordó, “Patch-based survey methods for studying prehistoric human land-use in agriculturally modified landscapes: A case study from the Canal de Navarrés, eastern Spain,” Quaternary International, vol. 483, pp. 5–22, Jul. 2018, doi: 10.1016/j.quaint.2018.01.034.

100. D. T. Robinson et al., “Modelling feedbacks between human and natural processes in the land system,” Earth Syst. Dynam., vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 895–914, Jun. 2018, doi: 10.5194/esd-9-895-2018.

99. O. García-Puchol, J. Bernabeu-Aubán, C. M. Barton, S. Pardo-Gordó, S. B. McClure, and A. Diez-Castillo, “A Bayesian Approach for Timing The Neolithization in Mediterranean Iberia,” Radiocarbon, vol. 60, no. 1, pp. 181–205, Feb. 2018, doi: 10.1017/RDC.2017.61.

98. A. Burke, J. Riel‐Salvatore, and C. M. Barton, “Human response to habitat suitability during the Last Glacial Maximum in Western Europe,” Journal of Quaternary Science, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 335–345, Apr. 2018, doi: 10.1002/jqs.3004.

97. C. M. Barton et al., “Risk and resilience in the late glacial: A case study from the western Mediterranean,” Quaternary Science Reviews, vol. 184, pp. 68–84, Mar. 2018, doi: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2017.09.015.

96. S. Pardo-Gordó, S. M. Bergin, J. Bernabeu Aubán, and C. M. Barton, “Alternative Stories of Agricultural Origins: The Neolithic Spread in the Iberian Peninsula,” in Times of Neolithic Transition along the Western Mediterranean, O. García-Puchol and D. C. Salazar-García, Eds. Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017, pp. 101–131.

95. J. Paige, K. Michelaki, C. Campisano, M. Barton, and A. Heimsath, “Are the intensities and durations of small-scale pottery firings sufficient to completely dehydroxylate clays? Testing a key assumption underlying ceramic rehydroxylation dating,” Journal of Archaeological Science, vol. 79, pp. 44–52, Mar. 2017, doi: 10.1016/j.jas.2017.01.009.

94. R. E. Morss et al., “Hazardous Weather Prediction and Communication in the Modern Information Environment,” Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., vol. December, pp. 2653–2674, Dec. 2017, doi: 10.1175/BAMS-D-16-0058.1.

93. B. Marwick et al., “Open science in archaeology,” The SAA Archaeological Record, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 8–14, Sep. 2017, doi: 10.17605/OSF.IO/3D6XX.

92. C. Gravel-Miguel, J. Riel-Salvatore, R. Maggi, G. Martino, and C. M. Barton, “The Breaking of Ochred Pebble Tools as Part of Funerary Ritual in the Arene Candide Epigravettian Cemetery,” Cambridge Archaeological Journal, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 331–350, May 2017, doi: 10.1017/S0959774316000640.

91. G. A. Clark and C. M. Barton, “Lithics, landscapes & la Longue-durée – Curation & expediency as expressions of forager mobility,” Quaternary International, vol. 450, pp. 137–149, Sep. 2017, doi: 10.1016/j.quaint.2016.08.002.

90. J. Gao, C. Gravel-Miguel, B. O’Neill, and C. M. Barton, “human and earth system models to assess regional climate change impacts and adaption in urban systems and their hinterlands.,” in The Atlas of the Human Planet, M. Pesaresi, M. Melchiorri, A. Siragusa, and T. Kemper, Eds. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union, 2016.

89. J. Bernabeu Aubán, O. García Puchol, M. Barton, S. McClure, and S. Pardo Gordó, “Radiocarbon dates, climatic events, and social dynamics during the Early Neolithic in Mediterranean Iberia,” Quaternary International, vol. 403, pp. 201–210, 2016, doi: 10.1016/j.quaint.2015.09.020.

88. C. M. Barton et al., “Experimental socioecology: Integrative science for Anthropocene landscape dynamics,” Anthropocene, vol. 13, pp. 34–45, Mar. 2016, doi: 10.1016/j.ancene.2015.12.004.

87. C. M. Barton and J. Riel-Salvatore, “A Lithic Perspective on Ecological Dynamics in the Upper Pleistocene of Western Eurasia,” in Archaeological Variability and Interpretation in Global Perspective, A. P. Sullivan III and D. I. Olszewski, Eds. Boulder, CO: University of Colorado Press, 2016, pp. 25–51.

86. C. M. Barton, “From Narratives to algorithms: extending archaeological explanation beyond archaeology,” in Oxford Handbook of Historical Ecology and Applied Archaeology, C. Isendahl and D. Stump, Eds. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, p. 27pp.

85. H. S. Sarjoughian, G. R. Meyer, I. I. Ullah, and C. M. Barton, “Managing Hybrid Model Composition Complexity: Human–Environment Simulation Models,” in Concepts and Methodologies for Modeling and Simulation, L. Yilmaz, Ed. Springer International Publishing, 2015, pp. 107–134.

84. S. Pardo Gordò, J. Bernabeu Aubán, O. Garcia Puchol, C. M. Barton, and S. M. Bergin, “The origins of agriculture in Iberia: a computational model,” Documenta Praehistorica, vol. XLII, pp. 117–131, 2015.

83. J. Bernabeu Aubán, C. M. Barton, S. Pardo Gordó, and S. M. Bergin, “Modeling initial Neolithic dispersal. The first agricultural groups in West Mediterranean,” Ecological Modelling, vol. 307, pp. 22–31, Jul. 2015, doi: 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2015.03.015.

82. C. M. Barton, I. I. Ullah, and A. Heimsath, “How to Make a Barranco: Modeling Erosion and Land-Use in Mediterranean Landscapes,” Land, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 578–606, Jul. 2015, doi: 10.3390/land4030578.

81. L. Alessa et al., “Best Practices for Integrating Social Sciences into Social Ecological Systems Science: Future Directions for Building a More Resilient America,” University of Idaho, Center Resilient Communities, 2015.

80. N. D. Rollins, C. M. Barton, S. Bergin, M. A. Janssen, and A. Lee, “A computational model library for publishing model documentation and code,” Environmental Modelling & Software, vol. 61, pp. 59–64, Nov. 2014, doi: 10.1016/j.envsoft.2014.06.022.

79. S. Gholami, H. S. Sarjoughian, G. W. Godding, D. R. Peters, and V. Chang, “Developing composed simulation and optimization models using actual supply-demand network datasets,” in Simulation Conference (WSC), 2014 Winter, Dec. 2014, pp. 2510–2521, doi: 10.1109/WSC.2014.7020095.

78. O. García Puchol, M. Barton, J. Bernabeu Aubán, A. Diez Castillo, and S. Pardo Gordò, “De la prospección sistemática al laboratorio GIS en La Canal de Navarrés,” SAGVNTVM. Papeles del Laboratorio de Arqueología de Valencia, vol. 46, no. 0, pp. 209–214, Nov. 2014, doi: 10.7203/SAGVNTVM.46.4239.

77. J. Bernabeu, O. García Puchol, S. Pardo, M. Barton, and S. B. McClure, “AEA 2012 Conference Reading: Socioecological dynamics at the time of Neolithic transition in Iberia,” Environmental Archaeology, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 214–225, Oct. 2014, doi: 10.1179/1749631414Y.0000000032.

76. J. Bernabeu Auban, C. M. Barton, O. García Puchol, A. Diez Castillo, and S. Pardo Gordó, “Prospecciones en la Canal de Navarrés: Campaña 2014,” Servei de Patrimoni. Consellería de Cultura, Generalitat Valenciana, Valencia, 2014.

75. C. M. Barton, “Complexity, Social Complexity, and Modeling,” J Archaeol Method Theory, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 306–324, Jun. 2014, doi: 10.1007/s10816-013-9187-2.

74. C. M. Barton and J. Riel-Salvatore, “The formation of lithic assemblages,” Journal of Archaeological Science, vol. 46, pp. 334–352, Jun. 2014, doi: 10.1016/j.jas.2014.03.031.

73. H. Sarjoughian, J. Smith, G. Godding, and M. Muqsith, “Model composability and execution across simulation, optimization, and forecast models,” in Proceedings of the Symposium on Theory of Modeling & Simulation-DEVS Integrative M&S Symposium, 2013, p. 30, Accessed: Aug. 27, 2015. Online. . Available: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2499664.

72. H. Mitasova, C. M. Barton, I. I. T. Ullah, J. Hofierka, and R. S. Harmon, “GIS-based soil erosion modeling,” in Treatise in Geomorphology: Vol. 3 Remote Sensing and GI Science in Geomorphology, J. Shroder and M. Bishop, Eds. San Diego, CA: Academic Press, 2013, pp. 228–258.

71. J. Fernández-López de Pablo and C. M. Barton, “Bayesian Estimation Dating of Lithic Surface Collections,” Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, Dec. 2013, doi: 10.1007/s10816-013-9198-z.

70. C. M. Barton, V. Villaverde, J. Zilhão, J. E. Aura, O. Garcia, and E. Badal, “In glacial environments beyond glacial terrains: Human eco-dynamics in late Pleistocene Mediterranean Iberia,” Quaternary International, vol. 318, pp. 53–68, 2013, doi: 10.1016/j.quaint.2013.05.007.

69. C. M. Barton, “Stories of the past or science of the future? archaeology and computational social science,” in Computational Approaches to Archaeological Spaces, A. Bevan and M. W. Lake, Eds. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press, 2013, pp. 151–178.

68. J. Bernabeu Auban, A. Moreno Martín, and C. M. Barton, “Complex systems, social networks and the evolution of social complexity,” in The Prehistory of Iberia: Debating Early Social Stratification and the State, M. Berrocal, L. García Sanjuán, and A. Gilman, Eds. New York: Routledge, 2012, pp. 23–37.

67. C. M. Barton, I. I. T. Ullah, S. M. Bergin, H. Mitasova, and H. Sarjoughian, “Looking for the future in the past: long-term change in socioecological systems,” Ecological Modelling, vol. 241, pp. 42–53, Aug. 2012, doi: 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2012.02.010.

66. C. M. Barton and J. Riel-Salvatore, “Agents of change: modeling biocultural evolution in Upper Pleistocene western Eurasia,” Advances in Complex Systems, vol. 15, no. 1–2, pp. 1150003-1-1150003–24, 2012, doi: 10.1142/S0219525911003359.

65. C. M. Barton and J. Riel-Salvatore, “Perception, Interaction, and Extinction: a Reply to Premo,” Human Ecology, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 797–801, 2012, doi: 10.1007/s10745-012-9530-3.

64. C. M. Barton, J. Riel-Salvatore, J. M. Anderies, and G. Popescu, “Modeling Human Ecodynamics and Biocultural Interactions in the Late Pleistocene of Western Eurasia,” Human Ecology, vol. 39, no. 6, pp. 705–725, Nov. 2011, doi: 10.1007/s10745-011-9433-8.

63. C. M. Barton, I. I. T. Ullah, and H. Mitasova, “Computational modeling and Neolithic socioecological dynamics: a case study from southwest Asia,” American Antiquity, vol. 75, no. 2, pp. 364–386, 2010.

62. C. M. Barton, I. I. T. Ullah, and S. Bergin, “Land use, water and Mediterranean landscapes: modelling long-term dynamics of complex socio-ecological systems,” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, vol. 368, no. 1931, pp. 5275–5297, Nov. 2010, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2010.0193.

61. A. Miller, C. M. Barton, O. García Puchol, and J. Bernabeu Aubán, “Surviving the Holocene crisis: human ecological responses to the onset of the current interglacial in Southern Valencia, Spain,” Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 65, pp. 207–220, 2009.

60. S. B. McClure, C. M. Barton, and M. A. Jochim, “Human Behavioral Ecology and Climate Change during the Transition to Agriculture in Valencia, Eastern Spain,” Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 65, no. 2, pp. 253–269, 2009.

59. K. Hill, C. M. Barton, and A. M. Hurtado, “The emergence of human uniqueness: Characters underlying behavioral modernity,” Evolutionary Anthropology, vol. 18, no. 5, pp. 187–200, 2009.

58. J. Riel-Salvatore, G. Popescu, and C. M. Barton, “Standing at the gates of Europe: human behavior and biogeography in the Southern Carpathians during the Late Pleistocene,” Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 399–417, 2008, doi: 10.1016/j.jaa.2008.02.002.

57. A. Miller and C. M. Barton, “Exploring the land: a comparison of land-use patterns in the Middle and Upper Paleolithic of the western Mediterranean,” Journal of Archaeological Science, vol. 35, pp. 1427–1437, 2008, doi: 10.1016/j.jas.2007.10.007.

56. M. A. Janssen, L. N. Alessa, C. M. Barton, S. Bergin, and A. Lee, “Towards a community framework for agent-based modeling,” Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 11, no. 2, p. 6, 2008.

55. G. Indruszewski and C. M. Barton, “Simulating sea surfaces for modeling Viking Age seafaring in the Baltic Sea,” in Digital Discovery: Exploring New Frontiers in Human Heritage. CAA 2006. Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Proceedings of the 34th Conference, Fargo, United States, April 2006, J. T. Clark and E. Hagemeister, Eds. Budapest: Archaeolingua, 2008, pp. 616–630.

54. G. Indruszewski and C. M. Barton, “Cost surface DEM modelling of Viking Age seafaring in the Baltic Sea,” in Beyond Illustration: 2D and 3D Digitial Technologies as Tools for Discovery in Archaeology, B. Frescher and A. Dakouri-Hild, Eds. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, 2008, pp. 56–64.

53. O. García Puchol, C. M. Barton, and J. Bernabeu Aubán, “Programa de prospección geofísica, microsondeos y catas para la caracterización de un gran foso del IV milenio cal AC en Alt del Punxó (Muro de L’Alcoi, Alacant),” Trab. prehist., vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 143–154, Jul. 2008, doi: 10.3989/tp.2008.v65.i1.140.

52. A. Díez Castillo, C. M. Barton, N. La Roca Cervigón, and J. Bernabeu Aubán, “Landscape socioecology in the Serpis Valley (10000-4000 BP),” in Layers of Perception: Proceedings of the 35th CAA Conference, Berlin, April 2007, A. Posluschny, K. Lambers, and I. Herzog, Eds. Bonn: Dr.Rudolf Habel GmbH. Kolloquien zur Vor- und Fruhgeschichte, Vol. 10, 2008.

51. J. Bernabeu Auban, L. Molina Balaguer, T. Orozco Köhler, A. Díaz Castillo, and C. M. Barton, “Early neolithic at the Serpis Valley, Alicante, Spain,” in The early Neolithic in the Iberian Peninsula. Regional and transregional components. Proceedings of the XV World Congress (Lisbon, 2006), M. Diniz, Ed. Oxford: BAR, 2008, pp. 53–59.

50. C. M. Barton, “General fitness, transmission, and human behavioral systems,” in Cultural Transmission, M. J. O’Brien, Ed. Washington, D.C.: American Archaeology Press, 2008, pp. 112–119.

49. L. Alessa, A. Kliskey, P. Williams, and M. Barton, “Perception of change in freshwater in remote resource-dependent Arctic communities,” Global Environmental Change, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 153–164, 2008, doi: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2007.05.007.

48. J. Riel-Salvatore and C. M. Barton, “New quantitative perspectives on the Middle-Upper Paleolithic transition: the view from the northern Mediterranean,” in Early Upper Paleolithic ‘Transitional’ Industries: New Questions, New Methods, J. Riel-Salvatore and G. A. Clark, Eds. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, 2007.

47. G. Popescu, J. Riel-Salvatore, and C. M. Barton, “Biogeographie umană şi organizare tehnologică în Pleistocenul Superior în regiunea Carpaţilor Meridionali,” Materiale şi Cercetări Arheologice, vol. Serie Noua III, pp. 19–42, 2007.

46. C. Fertelmes and C. M. Barton, “Using remote sensing to assess the impact of prehistoric agriculture on modern-day vegetation cover in the U.S. Southwest,” Society for Archaeological Sciences Bulletin, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 11–15, 2007.

45. C. M. Barton, A. Bezzi, L. Bezzi, D. Francisci, R. Gietl, and M. Neteler, “GRASS, un potente GIS per archeologi,” in Open Source, Free Software e Open Format nei processi di ricerca archeologici, Atti del I Workshop (Grosseto, 8 maggio 2006), R. Bagnara and G. M. Jánica, Eds. Siena: Universit`a degli Studi di Siena, 2007, pp. 97–103.

44. C. M. Barton, “Agricultural past a key to Arizona’s future,” Arizona Republic, p. 3, Dec. 08, 2007.

43. M. Peeples, C. M. Barton, and S. Schmich, “Resilience lost: intersecting landuse and landscape dynamics in the upland southwest,” Ecology and Society, vol. 12, no. 22, 2006.

42. S. McClure, M. A. Jochim, and C. M. Barton, “Behavioral ecology, domestic animals, and land use during the transition to agriculture in Valencia, eastern Spain,” in Foraging Theory and the Transition to Agriculture, D. Kennett and B. Winterhalder, Eds. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2006, pp. 197–216.

41. G. R. Mayer, H. S. Sarjoughian, E. K. Allen, S. E. Falconer, and C. M. Barton, “Simulation modeling for human community and agricultural landuse,” in Agent-Directed Simulation, Proceedings of the Agent-Directed Simulation Multi-Conference, Huntsville, Alabama, San Diego, CA: Society for Computer Simulation International, 2006, pp. 65–72.

40. O. García Puchol, J. E. Aura Tortosa, J. Bernabeu Aubán, and C. M. Barton, “El Abric de la Falguera en la Vall del Barxell-Polop: una perspectiva diacrónica,” in El Abric de la Falguera (Alcoi, Alacant). 8.000 años de ocupación humana en la cabecera del rio Alcoi, O. García Puchol and J. E. Aura Tortosa, Eds. Alicante: CAM (Caja de Ahorros del Mediterráneo) y Ajuntament d´Alcoi, 2006, pp. 279–290.

39. C. M. Barton, “Systematic survey and landscape studies,” in El Abric de la Falguera (Alcoi, Alacant). 8.000 años de ocupación humana en la cabecera del rio Alcoi, O. García Puchol and J. E. Aura Tortosa, Eds. Alicante: CAM (Caja de Ahorros del Mediterráneo) y Ajuntament d´Alcoi, 2006, pp. 73–83.

38. C. M. Barton, “El médio físico,” in El Abric de la Falguera (Alcoi, Alacant). 8.000 años de ocupación humana en la cabecera del rio Alcoi, O. García Puchol and J. E. Aura Tortosa, Eds. Alicante: CAM (Caja de Ahorros del Mediterráneo) y Ajuntament d´Alcoi, 2006, pp. 27–34.

37. L. Alessa, M. Laituri, and C. M. Barton, “An ‘all hands’ call to the social science community: establishing a community framework for complexity modeling using agent based models and cyberinfrastructure,” Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 9, no. 4, 2006.

36. D. R. Yesner, C. M. Barton, G. A. Clark, and G. Pearson, “Peopling of the Americas and continental colonization: a millennial perspective,” in The Settlement of the American Continents: a Multidisciplinary Approach to Human Biogeography, C. M. Barton, G. A. Clark, D. R. Yesner, and G. Pearson, Eds. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2004, pp. 198–213.

35. J. Riel-Salvatore and C. M. Barton, “Late Pleistocene technology, economic behavior, and land-use dynamics in southern Italy,” American Antiquity, vol. 69, no. 2, pp. 273–290, 2004.

34. G. A. Clark, C. M. Barton, D. R. Yesner, and G. Pearson, “An interdisciplinary perspective on long-term human biogeography and the Pleistocene colonization of the Americas,” in The Settlement of the American Continents: a Multidisciplinary Approach to Human Biogeography, C. M. Barton, G. A. Clark, D. R. Yesner, and G. Pearson, Eds. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2004, pp. 1–8.

33. C. M. Barton, S. Schmich, and S. R. James, “The ecology of human colonization in pristine landscapes,” in The Settlement of the American Continents: a Multidisciplinary Approach to Human Biogeography, C. M. Barton, G. A. Clark, D. R. Yesner, and G. Pearson, Eds. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2004, pp. 138–161.

32. C. M. Barton, G. A. Clark, D. R. Yesner, and G. Pearson, The Settlement of the American Continents: a Multidisciplinary Approach to Human Biogeography. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2004.

31. C. M. Barton, J. Bernabeu Auban, O. Garcia Puchol, S. Schmich, and L. Molina Balaguer, “Long-term socioecology and contingent landscapes,” Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 253–295, 2004, doi: 10.1023/B:JARM.0000047315.57162.b7.

30. C. M. Barton, J. Bernabeu Aubán, J. E. Aura Tortosa, and L. Molina Balaguer, “Historical contingency, nonlinearity, and the neolithization of the western Mediterranean,” in Current Issues in Mediterranean Landscape Archaeology, L. Wandsnider and E. Athanassopoulos, Eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004, pp. 99–124.

29. C. M. Barton, J. Bernabeu Aubán, J. E. Aura Tortosa, O. Garcia, and N. La Roca, “Dynamic landscapes, artifact taphonomy, and landuse modeling in the western Mediterranean,” Geoarchaeology, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 155–190, 2002.

28. O. García Puchol, C. M. Barton, J. Bernabeu Aubán, and J. E. Aura Tortosa, “Las ocupaciones prehistóricas del Barranc de l’Encantada (Beniarrés, Alacant): un primer balance de la intervención auqueológica en el área a través del análisis del registro lítico.,” Recerques del Museu d’Alcoi, vol. 10, pp. 25–42, 2001.

27. J. Bernabeu, C. M. Barton, and M. Perez Ripoll, “A taphonomic perspective on Neolithic beginnings: theory, interpretation, and empirical data in the western Mediterranean,” Journal of Archaeological Science, vol. 28, pp. 597–612, 2001.

26. J. Bernabeu, C. M. Barton, O. Garcia, and N. La Roca, “Systematic survey in Alicante, Spain: first results,” Türkyie Bilimer Akademisi Arkeoloji Dergisi, vol. 3, pp. 57–86, 2000.

25. J. Bernabeu Aubán, C. M. Barton, O. Garcia, and N. La Roca, “Prospecciones sistemáticas en el valle del Alcoi (Alicante): primeros resultados.,” Arqueología Espacial, vol. 21, pp. 29–64, 1999.

24. C. M. Barton, J. Bernabeu Aubán, J. E. Aura Tortosa, and O. Garcia Puchol, “Landscape dynamics and socioeconomic change: an example from the Polop Alto valley,” American Antiquity, vol. 64, no. 4, pp. 609–634, 1999.

23. V. Villaverde, J. E. Aura Tortosa, and C. M. Barton, “The Upper Paleolithic in Mediterranean Spain: a review of current evidence.,” Journal of World Prehistory, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 121–198, 1998.

22. C. M. Barton, “Looking back from the world’s end: Paleolithic settlement and mobility at Gibraltar,” in Las culturas del Pleistoceno superior en Andalucía, J. L. Sanchidrián Torti and M. D. Simón Vallejo, Eds. Nerja: Patronato de la Cueva de Nerja, 1998, pp. 13–23.

21. G. A. Clark and C. M. Barton, “Rediscovering Darwin,” in Rediscovering Darwin: Evolutionary Theory in Archaeological Explanation, vol. 7, C. M. Barton and G. A. Clark, Eds. Washington, D.C.: American Anthropological Association, 1997, pp. 309–319.

20. C. M. Barton and G. A. Clark, Rediscovering Darwin: Evolutionary Theory in Archaeological Explanation, vol. 7. Washington, D.C.: American Anthropological Association, 1997.

19. C. M. Barton and G. A. Clark, “Evolutionary theory in archaeological explanation,” in Rediscovering Darwin: Evolutionary Theory in Archaeological Explanation, vol. 7, C. M. Barton and G. A. Clark, Eds. Washington, D.C.: American Anthropological Association, 1997, pp. 3–18.

18. C. M. Barton, “Stone tools, style, and social identity: an evolutionary perspective on the archaeological record,” in Rediscovering Darwin: Evolutionary Theory in Archaeological Explanation, vol. 7, C. M. Barton and G. A. Clark, Eds. Washington, D.C.: American Anthropological Association, 1997, pp. 141–156.

17. G. A. Clark, C. M. Barton, and A. Cohen, “Explaining art in the Franco-Cantabrian refugium: an information exchange model,” in Debating Complexity, D. Meyer, P. Dawson, and D. Hanna, Eds. Calgary, Alberta: Archaeological Association of the University of Calgary, 1996, pp. 241–253.

16. C. M. Barton, D. I. Olszewski, and N. R. Coinman, “Beyond the graver: reconsidering burin function,” Journal of Field Archaeology, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 111–125, 1996.

15. C. M. Barton and M. P. Neeley, “Phantom cultures of the Levantine Epipaleolithic,” Antiquity, vol. 70, no. 267, pp. 139–147, 1996.

14. M. P. Neeley and C. M. Barton, “A new approach to interpreting late Pleistocene microlith industries in southwest Asia,” Antiquity, vol. 68, no. 259, pp. 275–288, 1994.

13. C. M. Barton, G. A. Clark, and A. E. Cohen, “Art as information: explaining Upper Paleolithic art in western Europe,” World Archaeology, vol. 26, pp. 185–207, 1994.

12. C. M. Barton and G. A. Clark, “Cultural and natural formation processes in late Quaternary cave and rockshelter sites of western Europe and the Near East,” in Formation Processes in Archaeological Context, P. Goldberg, D. T. Nash, and M. D. Petraglia, Eds. Madison, WI.: Prehistory Press, 1993, pp. 33–52.

11. F. Rubio Gomis and C. M. Barton, “Abric de la Falguera. Avance preliminar,” Anales de la Real Academia de Cultura Valenciana, vol. 69, pp. 15–30, 1992.

10. C. M. Barton, I. Guitart Perarnau, M. Macminn-Barton, N. La Roca, J. Bernabeu Aubán, and J. E. Aura Tortosa, “Informe preliminar sobre la prospección de la Vall del Barxell-Polop (Alcoi-Alacant),” Recerques del Museu d’Alcoi, vol. 1, pp. 81–84, 1992.

9. C. M. Barton, “Retouched tools: fact or fiction? Paradigms for interpreting chipped stone,” in Perspectives in prehistory paradigmatic biases in circum-Mediterranean hunter-gatherer research, G. A. Clark, Ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991, pp. 143–163.

8. D. I. Olszewski and C. M. Barton, “A note on biases in early excavations at Mugharet el-Wad and Nahal Oren,” Levant, vol. 22, pp. 43–46, 1990.

7. C. M. Barton, F. Rubio Gomis, C. A. Miksi, and D. J. Donahue, “Domestic olive,” Nature, vol. 346, no. 6284, pp. 518–519, 1990, doi: 10.1038/346518c0.

6. C. M. Barton, “Stone Tools and Paleolithic Settlement in the Iberian Peninsula,” Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society, vol. 56, pp. 15–32, 1990.

5. C. M. Barton, “Beyond style and function: a view from the Middle Paleolithic,” American Anthropologist, vol. 92, no. 1, pp. 57–72, 1990.

4. C. M. Barton, “Modèles de variabilité dans les outils du Paléolithique Moyen,” L’Anthropologie, vol. 93, no. 1, pp. 307–310, 1989.

3. C. M. Barton, Lithic variability and Middle Paleolithic behavior: new evidence from the Iberian Penninsula. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, 1988.

2. C. M. Barton, “An analysis of lithic variability from the Middle Paleolithic of the Iberian Peninsula,” doctoral dissertation, University of Arizona, 1987.

1. C. M. Barton, “Cultural and natural stratigraphy in the Campo Santo of Tumacacori Mission,” in Excavations at Tumacacori, 1979/1980, Tucson, AZ: WACC, National Park Service, 1981.

Research Activity: 
Summer 2020
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASB 799Dissertation
Spring 2020
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 326Human Impacts on Ancient Envir
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 584Internship
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASB 799Dissertation
Summer 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
Spring 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASB 799Dissertation
Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASM 579Proposal Writing
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 584Internship
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASB 799Dissertation
Summer 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 326Human Impacts on Ancient Envir
ASM 338Anthropological Field Session
ASB 375Humans and the Environment
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
ASM 300Anthropological Sciences Sem
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASB 799Dissertation
Summer 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
ASM 300Anthropological Sciences Sem
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASB 799Dissertation
Summer 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASB 799Dissertation
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASB 799Dissertation
Presentations: 

Barton's courses include Scholarly Inquiry, Fundamentals of Complex Adaptive Systems Sciences, Human Impacts on the Environment, GIS and Spatial Technologies in Anthropological Research, Geoarchaeology, Lithic Technology, and Origins of Agriculture.

Honors / Awards: 

Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science

Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies, Potsdam, Germany

Professional Associations: 

American Association for the Advancement of Science, Society for American Archaeology, Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Eta Sigma

Graduate Faculties / Mentoring History: 

ASU graduate faculties: Anthropology, Complex Adaptive Science, & Geological Sciences.

Visiting Research Professor: Dept. de Arqueologia y Prehistoria, University of Valencia.

PhD Students Directed:

  • Wendy Cegielski, 2020. Current position: Visiting Researcher, Arizona State University
  • Grant Snitker, 2019. Current position: Postdoctoral Scholar, University of Georgia, Athens.
  • Laura Swantek, 2017. Current position: Visiting Researcher, Arizona State University; Trustee, Cyprus Archaeological Research Institute. 
  • Claudine Gravel-Miguel, 2017. Current position: Postdoctoral Scholar, Arizona State University
  • Sean Bergin, 2016. Current position: Assistant Research Professor, Arizona State University
  • Elisabeth Culley, 2016. Current position: Visiting Researcher, Arizona State University
  • Gabriel Popescu, 2015. Current position: Lecturer, Department of Ancient History, Archaeology and Art History, University of Bucharest, Romania
  • Salvador Pardo Gordó, 2015. GRAMPO Research Group, Departament de Prehistòria, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain
  • Isaac Ullah, 2013. Current position: Associate Professor, San Diego State University
  • Steven Schmich, 2013. Current position: Visiting Researcher, Arizona State University
  • Bülent Arikan, 2010. Current position: Associate Professor, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey
  • Andrea Moreno Martin, 2010. Current position: Gestora Cultural y de Patrimonio, Ajuntament de Quart de Poblet, Spain 
  • Julien Riel-Salvatore, 2007. Current position: Professor, University of Montreal 
  • J. Brett Hill, 2002. Current position: Professor, Hendrix College​

Postdoctoral Scholars Mentored:

  • Sean Bergin, 2017-2018. Current position: Assistant Research Professor, Arizona State University
  • Joshua Watts, 2013-2017. Current position: Desert Archaeology, Tucson, AZ. 
  • Isaac Ullah, 2014-2016. Current position: Associate Professor, San Diego State University
  • Shade Shutters, 2012-2014. Current position: Research Scientist, Arizona State University
  • Carlos Rodríguez Rellán, 2012-2013. Current position: Assistant Professor, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, in Portugal
  • Bülent Arikan, 2010-2011. Current position: Associate Professor, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey
  • Pablo Cahiza, 2010-2011. Current position:  INCIHUSA-CONICET, Mendoza-Argentina
Service: 

Regional/National/International

  • Science Steering Committee, Analysis and Integrated Modeling of the Earth System, Future Earth (2018-present)
  • Director, Network for Computational Modeling in Social and Ecological Sciences, Director (2008-present)
  • Chair, External Expert Advisory Council, State of Alaska NSF EPSCoR program (2012-2017)
  • Societal Dimensions Working Group, Community Earth Systems Model, National Center for Atmospheric Research (2012-present)
  • Visiting Scientist, National Center for Atmospheric Research (2012, 2015, 2017)
  • ASU representative, University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (2009-present)
  • OSGeo Foundation. Public Geospatial Data Committee (2006-present)
  • GRASS GIS international development team (2004-present); Project Steering Committee (2006-present) http://grass.osgeo.org
  • Editorial board member for SAGVNTVM. Papeles del Laboratorio de Arqueología de la Universitat de València. 
  • Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission for Arizona (2002-2008)
  • AZSITE Consortium Board, statewide internet database for archaeological sites and surveys (1995-2010), chair (1999-2004, 2007-2008)
  • Society for American Archaeology: 2007 and 2018 Program Committee (2006-2007; 2017-2018)
  • Committee for the Preservation of Anthropological Records (1995-2002).
  • Tribal Museum Technical Assistance Program, Arizona Humanities Council, Consultant (1991-1995)
  • Editor, Museum Association of Arizona (1990-1991)
  • National Institutes of Health Review Panel (2011)
  • National Science Foundation Review Panels: Coupled Human and Natural Systems (2005, 2008, 2010, 2012), Human Social Dynamics (2006)
  • Project Review Panel: Canadian Social Science and Humanities Research Council (2003)
  • Proposal reviewer, National Science Foundation, National Geographic, National Center for Preservation Technology and Training (National Park Service), Natural Environment Research Council (UK), Social Science Research Council (Canada), Austrian Science Fund.

ASU

  • Head, Graduate Faculty for Complex Adaptive Systems Science (2011-present)
  • Social Science Research Council (2015-present)
  • ASU Research Computing Governance Board (2017-2020)
  • University Undergraduate Standards Committee (2015-2017)
  • Academic Standards Committee, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (2013-2015)
  • Executive Board, Consortium for Biosocial Complex Systems and Global Biosocial Complexity Initiative (2009-present)
  • Director, Center for Social Dynamics & Complexity (2009-present); Steering Committee, Science Coordinator, Executive Board  (2008-2009)
  • GIServices Professional Advisory Council (2005-present)
  • Faculty mentor, Faculty Development Program (2004-2005)
  • Advisory Committee on Technology (1994-2000)
  • Research Investigation Committee (Assoc. Vice Provost for Research, ASU, 1998-1999)    
  • Dean's Strategic Resource Planning Committee (1994-1996)
  • Treasurer, Sigma Xi, ASU Chapter (1994-1995)
  • Provost's Advisory Committee for Academic Professionals (1991-1994); chair (1992-1994)
  • University Grievance Committee (1990-1992); chair (1992)
  • Dean's Academic Professional Advisory Committee (ASU, 1990-1991)

School of Complex Adaptive Systems 

  • Associate Director, (2020-present)

School of Human Evolution & Social Change/Dept. of Anthropology

  • Graduate/Undergraduate Committee (2016)
  • Archaeology Subdiscipline, chair and Archaeology Approach Head (1993-1995, 2004, 2016)
  • Director of Graduate Studies (2007-2009)
  • Affirmative Action Representative (1999-present)
  • Museum Studies Committee (1997-2007)
  • Museum of Anthropology Steering Committee (1998-2007)
  • Executive Committee (2004-2006)
  • Graduate Curriculum Committee (2005-2006)
  • Computer Resources Committee, chair (1987-2003), member (2003-2005)
  • Graduate Committee (1993-1995, 2004)
  • Personnel Committee (1997-1998, 2002-2004); chair (1998, 2002)    
  • Ruppé Prize Committee (1997-1998, 2000-2001)
  • Research and Development Committee (1995)
  • Museum Advisory Committee (1987-1997; 1999)
  • Curator of Anthropology Collections (1987-2007)