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Cody Telep

Assistant Professor
Faculty, DTPHX Campus, Mailcode 4420
Biography

Cody Telep is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. He previously worked as a research associate at the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy at George Mason University. His research focuses on synthesizing research to assess what works in policing; partnering with agencies to examine the impact of police practices on crime, disorder, and citizen perceptions of legitimacy; and examining and increasing receptivity to research and evidence-based practice in policing. His recent work has appeared in Crime & DelinquencyJournal of Quantitative Criminology, Journal of Experimental Criminology, and Policing and Society. He is the 2017 recipient of the Emerging Public Service Educator Award from the College of Public Service and Community Solutions.

Education
  • Ph.D. Criminology, Law and Society, George Mason Univeristy, 2013
  • M.A., Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland, College Park, 2008
  • B.A., Sociology and Political Science, Emory University, 2005
Research Interests
  • The impact of police practices on crime and disorder
  • The relationship between police activities and perceptions of legitimacy
  • The use of evidence-based policies and practices in policing and criminal justice
  • Experimental methodologies in evaluation research
Publications
  • Telep, C. W., & Hibdon, J. (Forthcoming). Community crime prevention in high crime areas: The Seattle Neighborhood Group hot spots project. City & Community.
  • Telep, C. W., Ready, J., & Bottema, A. J. (In press). Working towards intelligence-led policing: The Phoenix Police Department Intelligence Officer Program. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice.
  • Reisig, M., Mays, R. D., & Telep, C. W. (In press). The effects of procedural injustice during police-citizen encounters: A factorial vignette study. Journal of Experimental Criminology.
  • Telep, C. W., & Somers, L. J. (In press). Examining police officer definitions of evidence-based policing:  Are we speaking the same language? Policing and Society: An International Journal of Research and Policy.
  • Nagin, D. S., & Telep, C. W. (2017). Procedural justice and legal compliance. Annual Review of Law and Social Science, 13, 5–28.
  • Hibdon, J., Telep, C. W., & Groff, E. R. (2017). The concentration and stability of drug activity in Seattle, Washington using police and emergency medical services data. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 33(3), 497–517.
  • Telep, C. W. (2017). Police officer receptivity to research and evidence-based policing: Examining variability within and across agencies. Crime & Delinquency, 63(8), 976–999.
  • Telep, C. W., & Hibdon, J. (2017). Identifying and responding to hot spots: Are crime counts enough? Criminology and Public Policy, 16(2), 661–671.
  • Telep, C. W., & Winegar, S. (2016). Police executive receptivity to research: A survey of chiefs and sheriffs in Oregon. Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, 10(3), 241–249. 
  • Telep, C. W. (2016). Expanding the scope of evidence-based policing. Criminology and Public Policy, 15(1), 243–252.
  • Weisburd, D., Eck, J. E, Braga, A. A., Telep, C. W., Cave, B., Bowers, K., Bruinsma, G., Gill, C., Groff, E. R., Hibdon, J., Hinkle, J. C., Johnson, S. D., Lawton, B., Lum, C., Ratcliffe, J. H., Rengert, G., Taniguchi, T., & Yang, S.-M. (2016). Place matters: Criminology for the twenty-first century. New York: Cambridge University Press. 
  • Telep, C. W., Garner, J., & Visher, C. A. (2015). The production of criminological experiments revisited: The nature and extent of federal support for experimental designs, 2001–2013. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 11(4), 541–563. 
  • Cave, B., Telep, C. W., & Grieco, J. (2015). Rigorous evaluation research among U.S. police departments: Special cases or a representative sample? Police Practice and Research: An International Journal, 16(3), 254–268.
  • Telep, C. W., & Lum, C. (2014). The receptivity of officers to empirical research and evidence-based policing: An examination of survey data from three agencies. Police Quarterly, 17(4), 359–385.
  • Telep, C. W., & Weisburd, D. (2014). Generating knowledge: A case study of the National Policing Improvement Agency program on systematic reviews in policing. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 10(4), 371–398. 
  • Telep, C. W., Weisburd, D. Gill, C. E., Teichman, D., & Vitter, Z. (2014). Displacement of crime and diffusion of crime control benefits in large-scale geographic areas: A systematic review. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 10(4), 515–548. 
  • Gill, C. E., Weisburd, D., Telep, C. W., Bennett, T., & Vitter, Z. (2014). Community-oriented policing to reduce crime, disorder, and fear and increase legitimacy and citizen satisfaction in neighborhoods. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 10(4), 399–428.
  • Weisburd, D., & Telep, C. W. (2014). Hot spots policing: What we know and what we need to know. Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 30(2), 200–220.
Research Activity
  • 2018–2020  “Indio community-based transitional housing program” (California Department of Finance, subcontract from the Indio Police Department)
  • 2017–2019 “Tucson Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation” (Bureau of Justice Assistance)    
  • 2017–2018 “Learning by doing:  The Arizona Inside-Out Prison Exchange program” (Women & Philanthropy, Arizona State University)
  • 2016–2019 “Working toward a model of intelligence-led policing: The Phoenix Police Department intelligence officer program” (Bureau of Justice Assistance, subcontract from the Phoenix Police Department)
  • 2016–2019 “Evaluating procedural justice in hot spots policing: A multi-site randomized controlled trial” (Laura and John Arnold Foundation; subcontract from Police Foundation)
  • 2016 “Evidence assessment of President’s Task Force Recommendations” (Laura and John Arnold Foundation; subcontract from George Mason University)
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
CRJ 317Inside-Out Prison Excg Program
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
CRJ 503Research Methods
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
CRJ 494Special Topics
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
CRJ 503Research Methods
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
CRJ 504Statistical Tools/Criminal Jus
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
CRJ 503Research Methods
CRJ 516Seminar in Crim Jus Org & Mgmt
CRJ 607Advanced Topics in Policing
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
CRJ 201Crime Control Policies
CRJ 516Seminar in Crim Jus Org & Mgmt
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
CRJ 503Research Methods
CRJ 516Seminar in Crim Jus Org & Mgmt
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
CRJ 201Crime Control Policies
Fall 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
CRJ 201Crime Control Policies
Presentations
  • Telep, C. W. (2018). Are criminal justice practitioners open to using research? A comparison ofpolice and correctional supervisors. Presented February 15 at the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA.
  • Telep, C. W. (2017). A multi-agency approach to combatting homelessness: The Indio, CA Community Outreach Resource Program.  Presented November 15 at the American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Telep, C. W., & Weisburd, D.  (2017). What works in policing? Lessons from systematic reviews. Presented June 26 at the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Symposium, Arlington, VA.
  • Telep, C. W., & Nagin, D. S. (2017). Procedural justice and legal compliance: A review of research. Presented June 26 at the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Symposium, Arlington, VA.
  • Telep, C. W. (2017). Policing research resources and examples of evidence-based policing in practice. Presented June 2 at “Violence prevention and reduction: What works? An evidence-based policing workshop” Halifax, NS.
  • Telep, C. W. (2017). What is evidence-based policing and how can police learn more about it? Presented May 22 at the American Society of Evidence-Based Policing Conference, Phoenix, AZ.
  • Telep, C. W., & Somers, L. (2016). What does evidence-based policing mean to police officers? Presented November 16 at the American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA.
  • Telep, C. W., Twiss, R, Cox, T., & Ibarra, J. (2016). Homelessness and nuisance behavior in Indio, California. Presented October 24-25 at the Center for Problem-Oriented Policing Conference, Tempe, AZ.
  • Telep, C. W. (2016). The importance of expanding the scope of evidence-based policing. Presented May 23 at the 2016 Annual Drapkin Conference: The Future of the Police, Jerusalem, Israel.
  • Telep, C. W., & Ready, J. (2016). The Phoenix intelligence officer program: The effects of intelligence-led policing on officer attitudes and behavior. Presented March 31 at the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Meeting, Denver, CO.
  • Telep, C. W. (2016). A multi-agency approach to combatting homelessness: The Indio, CA Community Outreach Resource Program. Presented January 14 at the Smart Policing Initiative Collaboration Workshop, Portland, OR.
  • Telep, C. W., & Hibdon, J. (2015). Community crime prevention in high crime areas: The Seattle Neighborhood Group hot spots pilot project. Presented November 18 at the American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, Washington, DC.
  • Telep, C. W. (2015). Police receptivity to research and evidence-based policing: Examining variability within and across agencies. Presented August 17 at the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy-Police Foundation Joint Symposium, Arlington, VA.
  • Telep, C. W., & Weisburd, D. (2015). Situational crime prevention and police effectiveness: A review of evaluation studies. Presented June 8 at the Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Telep, C. W., & Ready, J. (2015). Working toward a model of intelligence-led policing: The Phoenix Intelligence Officer Program. Presented February 20 at the Western Society of    Criminology Meeting, Phoenix, AZ.
  • Telep, C. W., Garner, J., & Visher, C. A. (2014). The production of criminological experiments revisited: Federal funding and the impact of experiments, 2001–2013. Presented November 19 at the American Society of Criminology Meeting, San Francisco, CA.
  • Telep, C. W., Weisburd, D., Gill, C. E., Vitter, Z., & Teichman, D. (2014). Displacement of crime and diffusion of crime control benefits in large-scale geographic areas: A systematic review. Presented June 18 at the Campbell Collaboration Colloquium, Belfast, UK.
  • Telep, C. W., & Lum, C. (2014). The impact of departmental and officer characteristics on receptivity to research and evidence-based policing. Presented February 20 at the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Meeting, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Telep, C. W., & Hibdon, J. (2013). How unsafe are crime hot spots? An examination of the risk of victimization on high crime street blocks in Seattle, Washington. Presented November 22 at the American Society of Criminology Meeting, Atlanta, GA.
Honors / Awards
  • Emerging Public Service Educator, College of Public Service and Community Solutions, 2017
  • Donal MacNamara Award for Outstanding Journal Publication for “How much time should the police spend at crime hot spots?: Answers from a police agency directed randomized field trial in Sacramento, California,” Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, 2016
  • Nomination for the Best Paper Award for Vol. 16 of Police Practice and Research: An International Journal for “Rigorous evaluation research among U.S. police departments: Special cases or a representative sample?”, 2016
  •  Sage Junior Faculty Professional Development Teaching Workshop Award, Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, 2016
Professional Associations
  • Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (Police Section)
  • American Society of Criminology (Division of Communities and Place, Division of Experimental Criminology, Division of Policing)
  • American Society of Evidence-Based Policing
  • International Association of Chiefs of Police
Graduate Faculties / Mentoring History

Dissertation committees

  • Travis Meyers, 2018
  • Eryn O’Neal, 2015
  • Andrea Borrego, 2015

Master’s thesis committees

  • Kelsey Kramer, 2018
  • Caitlin Matekel, 2018
  • Cassandra Philippon, 2018
  • Wesley Smith, 2018
  • Stephanie Morse, 2017
  • Chelsea Ruffner, 2017
  • Jon Bottema (chair), 2017
  • Diana Caraveo Parra, 2017
  • Karissa Pelletier, 2017
  • Nathan Ostertag, 2016
  • Norah Ylang, 2016
  • Ryan Mays, 2016
  • Kathleen Padilla, 2016
  • Natasha Pusch, 2016
  • Logan Somers, 2016
  • Joshua Broyles, 2014
  • Allyson Roy, 2014                     
Service
  • Research Advisory Committee, International Association of Chiefs of Police (2008 - present)
  • Sub-Area Chair, Police Strategies, Interventions and Evaluations, American Society of Criminology Program Committee (2017 - 2018)
  • Executive Counselor, Division of Experimental Criminology, American Society of Criminology (2015 - 2017)
  • Mentor Award Committee, American Society of Criminology (2015 - 2017)
  • Division of Policing, American Society of Criminology, Secretary-Treasurer (2014 - 2016)
  • American Society of Criminology Student Affairs Committee, Member (2014 - 2015)
Expertise Areas