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Joan Silk

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Professor and Research Affiliate, Institute of Human Origins
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Professor
Faculty, Tempe Campus, Mailcode 2402
IHO Research Affiliate and Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 2402
Biography

Joan Silk moved to ASU's School of Human Evolution and Social Change in 2012, from UCLA. She is interested in how natural selection shapes the evolution of social behavior in primates.

Most of Silk's empirical work has focused on the behavioral and reproductive strategies of female baboon. She recently initiated a comparative study of the structure and function of close social bonds in four baboon species (anubis, hamadryas, gelada, and chacma).

In particular, Silk is interested in questions that explicitly link studies of nonhuman primates to humans. Experimental work she conducts with chimpanzees and children focuses on the phylogenetic origins and ontogenetic development of prosocial preferences.

Silk received her PhD from UC Davis in 1981, and spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow in the Altmann’s lab at the University of Chicago. She then I joined the Department of Anthropology at Emory University.

Silk moved to UCLA in 1986, where she remained until 2012. At UCLA, she was a founding member of the Center of Behavior, Evolution, and Culture and served as department chair for six years.

Education

1981 PhD, University of California - Davis

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Research Interests

I am interested in how natural selection shapes the evolution of social behavior in primates. Most of my empirical work has focused on the behavioral and reproductive strategies of female baboon. I have recently initiated a comparative study of the structure and function of close social bonds in four baboon species (anubis, hamadryas, gelada, and chacma).

I am particularly interested in questions that explicitly link studies of nonhuman primates to humans. Experimental work conducted with chimpanzees and children focuses on the phylogenetic origins and ontogenetic development of prosocial preferences.

Publications

Books

Boyd, R. & Silk, J.B. 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2009, 2012, 2015, 2018. How Humans Evolved. W.W. Norton Press, New York. 

Spanish Translation (2nd Edition).  Como Evolucionaron los Humanos.  Ariel Ciencia, S.A., Barcelona, 2001.

French Translation (3rd Edition).  L'aventure humaine : Des molécules à la culture. De Boeck, 2003.

Japanese transation (5th Edition). 2011.

Excerpts from Chapter 9 reprinted in Research Frontiers in Anthropology: Advances in Archaeology and Physical Anthropology, ed. by C. Ember and M. Ember, Prentice Hall.)

 

Kappeler, P. & Silk, J.B. (editors) 2010. Mind the Gap: The origins of human universals. Springer Verlag, Berlin.

Mitani, J., Call, J., Kappeler, P., Palombit, R., Silk, J.B. (editors) (2012). The Evolution of Primate Societies. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Journal Publications and Book Chapters

Silk, J.B. 1978.  Patterns of food sharing among mother and infant chimpanzees at Gombe National Park, Tanzania. Folia Primatologica 29: 129- 141.

Silk, J.B. 1979.  Feeding, foraging, and food sharing of immature chimpanzees. Folia Primatologica 31: 123-142.

Silk, J.B. 1980.  Kidnapping and female competition in captive bonnet macaques. Primates 21: 100-110.

Silk, J.B. 1980.  Adoption and kinship in Oceania. American Anthropologist 82: 799-820.

Silk, JB, Samuels, A, & Rodman, PS.  1981.  Hierarchical organization of female Macaca radiata. Primates 22: 84-95.

Silk, JB, Clark-Wheatley, CB, Rodman, PS, & Samuels, A. 1981.  Differential reproductive success and facultative adjustment of sex ratios among captive female bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata). Animal Behaviour 29: 1106-1120.

Silk, JB, Samuels, A., & Rodman, PS. 1981.  The influence of kinship, rank, and sex upon affiliation and aggression among adult females and immature bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata).  Behaviour 78: 112-137.

Silk, J.B. 1981.  Social behavior of female  Macaca radiata: the influence of kinship and rank upon cooperation and competition. Ph.D. thesis, University of California, Davis.

Silk, J.B. 1982.  Altruism among adult female bonnet macaques: explanation and analysis of patterns of grooming and coalition formation. Behaviour 79: 162-187.

Silk, J.B. 1982.  Review of The Woman that Never Evolved, by S.B. Hrdy. Ethology and Sociobiology 5: 53-55.

Silk, JB & Boyd, R. 1983.  Female cooperation, competition, and mate choice in matrilineal macaque groups. In: Social Behavior of Female Vertebrates (ed. by S.K. Wasser) Academic Press, New York, p. 315-347.

Boyd, R & Silk, J.B. 1983.  A method of assigning cardinal indices of dominance rank. Animal Behaviour 31: 45-58.

Silk, J.B. 1983.  Local resource competition and facultative adjustment of sex ratios in relation to competitive ability. American Naturalist 121: 56-66.

Silk, JB & Samuels, A.  1984. Triadic interactions among male Macaca radiata: passports and buffers. American Journal of Primatology 6: 373-376.

Silk, J.B. 1984.  Measurement of the relative importance of individual selection and kin selection in the genus Macaca. Evolution 38: 553-559.

Samuels, A., Silk, JB, & Rodman, PS. 1984.  Changes in the dominance rank and reproductive behavior of male bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata). Animal Behaviour 32: 994-1003.

Silk, J.B. 1984.  Local resource competition and the evolution of male-biased sex ratios. Journal of Theoretical Biology 108: 203-213.

Silk, JB & Boyd, R. 1984.  Response to J. Rushen. Animal Behaviour 32:933-934.

Silk JB, Samuels A. 1984.  Triadic interactions among Macaca radiata: passports and buffers. American Journal of Primatology 6:373-376.

Silk, J.B. 1984.  Review of Primate Social Relationships, edited by R.A. Hinde.  Science 224: 981-982.

Silk, J.B. 1984.  Review of Child Abuse: the Nonhuman Primate Data, edited by M. Reite and N.G. Caine. American Anthropologist 86: 1034-1036.

Silk, J.B. 1985.  Review of Reproductive Decisions, by R.I.M. Dunbar.   Science 229: 961-962.

Silk, J.B. 1985. Review of Too Many Women? The Sex Ratio Question by M. Guttentag and P. Secord. Ethology and Sociobiology 6: 4-68.

Silk, J.B. 1986.  Eating for two: behavioral and environmental correlates of gestation length among  free-ranging baboons (Papio cynocephalus). International Journal of Primatology 7:583-602.

Silk, J.B. 1986.  Review of Primate Sociobiology by J.P. Gray. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 71: 21-122.

Silk, J.B. 1987.  Adoption and fosterage in human societies: adaptations or enigmas? Cultural Anthropology 2:39-49.

Silk, J.B. 1987.  Social behavior in evolutionary perspective. In: Primate Societies, ed. by B.B. Smuts et al). University of Chicago Press, Chicago, pp. 318-329.

Samuels, A, Silk, JB, & Altmann, J. 1987.  Continuity and change in dominance relationships among female baboons. Animal Behaviour 35: 785-793.

Silk, J.B. 1987.  Correlates of aggression and competition among pregnant baboons. American Journal of Primatology 12: 479-495.

Silk, J.B. 1987.  Inuit adoption. Ethos 15:320-330.

Silk, J.B. 1987.  Activities and diet of free-ranging pregnant baboons, Papio cynocephalus, International Journal of Primatology 8: 593- 613.

Silk, J.B. 1988.  Social mechanisms of population regulation in a captive group of bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata), American Journal of Primatology 14: 111-124.

Silk, J.B. 1988.  Maternal investment in captive bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata), The American Naturalist 132: 1-19.

Silk, J.B. 1988.  Review of Apes of the World by R.H. Tuttle. International Journal of Primatology 9: 385-387.

Silk, J.B. 1988.  Review of Human Birth by W.R. Trevathan. American Scientist 76(5): 424.

Silk, J.B. 1989.  Reproductive synchrony in captive macaques.  American Journal of Primatology 19: 137-146.

Silk, J.B. 1990.  Human adoption in evolutionary perspective. Human Nature 1:25-52.

Silk, J.B. 1990.  Sources of variation in interbirth intervals among captive bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata). American Journal of Physical Anthropology 82: 213-230.

Silk, J.B. 1990.  Comment on Turke 1990: Which humans adopt adaptively, and does it matter?  Ethology and Sociobiology 11: 425-426.

Silk, J.B. 1991.  Mother-infant relationships in bonnet macaques: sources of variation in proximity. International Journal of Primatology 12:21-38.

Silk, J.B. 1992.  Patterns of intervention in agonistic contests among male bonnet macaques.  In: Coalitions and Alliances in Humans and Other Animals (ed. by S. Harcourt and F. de Waal).  Oxford University Press,Oxford, pp. 215-232.

Silk, J.B. 1992.  The patterning of intervention among male bonnet macaque: reciprocity, revenge, and loyalty.  Current Anthropology 33:318-325.

Silk, J.B. 1992.  The origins of caregiving behavior.  American Journal of Physical Anthropology 87: 227-229.

Silk, JB, Short, J, Roberts, J, & Kemnitz, J. 1993.  Gestation Length in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta). International Journal of Primatology 14:95-104.

Silk, J.B. 1993.  The evolution of social conflict among primate females. In: Primate Social Conflict (ed. by W.A. Mason and S. Mendoza). SUNY Press, Albany, pp. 49-83.

Silk, J.B. 1993.  Primatological perspectives on gender hierarchies.  In: Gender Hierarchies (ed. by B. Miller). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge., pp. 212-235.

Silk, J.B. 1993.  Does participation in coalitions influence dominance relationships among male bonnet macaques?  Behaviour 126:171-189.

Silk, J.B. 1994.  Social relationships of male bonnet macaques: male bonding in a matrilineal society.  Behaviour 130:271-291.

Cheney, D.L., Seyfarth, R.M., & Silk, J.B. 1995.  The role of grunts in reconciling opponents and facilitating interactions among adult female baboons.  Animal Behaviour 50:249-257.

Cheney, D.L., Seyfarth, R.M., & Silk, J.B. 1995. The responses of female baboons (Papio cynocephalus ursinus) to anomalous social interactions: evidence for causal reasoning? Journal of Comparative Psychology 109: 134-141.

Silk, J.B., Cheney, D.L., & Seyfarth, R.M. 1996. The form and function of post-conflict interactions among female baboons.  Animal Behaviour 52:259-268.

Silk, J.B. 1996.  Why do primates reconcile? Evolutionary Anthropology 5: 39-42.

Levine, N.E. & Silk, J.B. 1997. Why polyandry fails: sources of instability in polyandrous marriages. Current Anthropology 38: 375-398.

Kummer, H., Daston, L., Gigerenzer, G. & Silk, J.B. 1997. The social intelligence hypothesis. In: Human by Nature (ed. by P. Weingart, S.D. Mitchell, P.J. Richerson, and S. Maasen). Erlbaum Press, pp 157-179.  

Silk, J.B.1997. The function of peaceful post-conflict contacts among primates. Primates 38: 265-279.

Silk, J.B. 1998.  Making amends: adaptive perspectives on conflict remediation in monkeys, apes, and humans. Human Nature 9:341-368.

Frantzen, M.A.J., Silk, J.B., Ferguson, J.W.H., Wayne, R.K., and Kohn, M.H. 1998. Empirical evaluation of preservation methods for fecal DNA. Molecular Ecology 7:1423-1428.

Silk, J.B. 1999. Why are infants so attractive to others? The form and function of infant handling in bonnet macaques. Animal Behaviour 57:1021-1032.

Silk, J.B. 1999. Male bonnet macaques use information about third party rank relationships to recruit allies. Animal Behaviour 58: 45-51.

Silk, J.B., D.L. Cheney, and R.M. Seyfarth. 1999. The structure of social relationships among female savannah baboons in Moremi Reserve, Botswana. Behaviour 136: 679-703.

Silk, J.B. and Stanford, C.B. 1999. Infanticide article disputed. Anthropology News 40: 27-29.

Silk, J.B., E. Kaldor, and R. Boyd. 2000. Cheap talk when interests conflict. Animal Behaviour 59: 423-432.

Silk, J.B. 2000. The function of peaceful post-conflict interactions: an alternate view. In: Natural Conflict Resolution (ed. by F. Aureli and F.B.M. de Waal), University of California Press, Berkeley, CA, pp 179-181.

Palombit, R.A., D.L. Cheney, J. Fischer, S. Johnson, D. Rendall, R.M. Seyfarth, and J.B. Silk. 2000. Male infanticide and defense of infants in chacma baboons. In: Male Infanticide and its Implications (ed. by C.P. van Schaik and C.H. Janson), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 123-151.

Silk, J.B. 2000. Review of On the Move: How and Why Animals Travel in Groups edited by S. Boinski and P.A. Garber. Ethology 106: 1045-1048.

Silk, J.B. 2001. Ties that bond: the role of kinship in primate societies. In: New Directions in Anthropological Kinship (ed. by L. Stone), Rowman and Littlefield,  Boulder, CO, pp. 71-92.

Silk, J.B. 2001. Primate socioecology. In: International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences, (ed. by N. Smelser and P. Baltes), Elsevier Science, Oxford, pp. 12028-12032.

Silk, J.B. 2001. Bonnet macaques: evolutionary perspectives on females’ lives. In: Model Systems in Behavioral Ecology, (ed. by L.A. Dugatkin), Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J., pp. 433-452.

Silk, J.B. 2001. Review of Tree of Origin: What Primate Behavior Can Tell Us about Human Social Evolution edited by F.B.M. de Waal. Evolution and Human Behavior 22(6): 443-448.

Silk, J.B. 2002. Grunts, girneys, and good intentions: the origins of strategic commitment in nonhuman primates. In: Commitment: Evolutionary Perspectives (ed. by R. Nesse), Russell Sage Press, pp. 138-157.

Silk, J.B.2002. Kin selection in primate groups. International Journal of Primatology 23(4): 849–875.

Silk, J.B.2002. Females, food, family, and friendship. Evolutionary Anthropology 11: 85-87.

Silk, J.B. 2002. The form and function of reconciliation in primates. Annual Review of Anthropology 31: 21-44.

Silk, J.B. guest editor. 2002. What are friends for? The adaptive value of social bonds. Behavior 139 (2-3).

Silk, J.B.2002. Introduction to special edition. Behavior 139(2-3): 173-175.

Silk, J.B. 2002. Using the ‘F’ word in primatology. Behavior 139(2-3): 421-446.

Boyd, R., Silk, J.B. 2002. Human Sociobiology. In: Encyclopedia of Evolution (M. Pagel, ed.), Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 533-537.

Brown, G.R., Silk, J.B. 2002.  Reconsidering the null hypothesis: Is maternal rank associated with birth sex ratios in primate groups? Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 99(17): 11252-11255.

Silk, J.B. 2002. Practice random acts of aggression and senseless acts of intimidation: the logic of status contests in social groups. Evolutionary Anthropology 11:221-225.

Buchan, J.C., Alberts, S.C., Silk, J.B., Altmann, J. 2003. True paternal care in a multi-male primate society. Nature 425:179-181.

Silk, J.B., Rendall, D., Cheney, D.L., Seyfarth, R.M. 2003. Natal attraction in adult female baboons (Papio cynocephalus ursinus) in the Moremi Reserve, Botswana. Ethology 109:627-644.

Silk, J.B. 2003. Cooperation without counting: the puzzle of friendship. In: The Genetic and Cultural Evolution of Cooperation (P. Hammerstein, ed.), Dahlem Workshop Report 90. Cambridge, MA, The MIT Press, pp. 37-54.

McElreath, R., Clutton-Brock, T.H., Fehr, E. Fessler, D.M.T., Hagen, E.H., Hammerstein, P., Kosfeld, M.,  Milinski, M., Silk, J.B., Tooby, J., & Wilson, M.I. (2003). The Role of Cognition and Emotion in Cooperation. In: The Genetic and Cultural Evolution of Cooperation (P. Hammerstein, ed.), Dahlem Workshop Report 90. Cambridge, MA, The MIT Press, pp. 125-152.

Silk, J.B., Alberts, S.C., Altmann, J. 2003. Social bonds of female baboons enhance infant survival. Science 302:1331-1334.

Silk, J.B., Alberts, S.C., Altmann, J. 2004. Patterns of  coalition formation by adult female baboons in Amboseli, Kenya. Animal Behaviour 67: 573-582.

Manson, J.H., Navarette, C.D., Silk, J.B., Perry, S. 2004. Time-matched grooming in female primates?  New analyses from two species. Animal Behaviour 67: 493-500.

Silk, J.B., Brown, G.R. 2004. Sex ratios in primate groups. In: Sexual Selection in Primates (P. Kappeler, C. van Schaik, eds.) Cambridge University Press, pp 253-265.   

Cheney. D.L., Seyfarth, R.M., Fischer, J., Beehner, J., Bergman, T., Johnson, S.E., Kitchen, D.M., Palombit, R.A., Silk, J.B. 2004. Factors affecting reproduction and mortality among baboons in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. International Journal of Primatology 25:401-428.

Silk, J.B., Willoughby, E., & Brown, G.R. 2005. Maternal rank and local resource competition do not predict birth sex ratios in wild baboons. Proceedings of the Royal Society London, Series B 272: 569-574.  

Silk, J.B. 2005. The evolution of cooperation in primate groups. In:  Moral Sentiments and Material Interests: On the Foundations of Cooperation in Economic Life (H. Gintis, S. Bowles, R. Boyd, and E. Fehr eds.), MIT Press, Cambridge, pp. 43-73.

Silk, J.B., Brosnan, S.F., Vonk, J., Henrich, J., Povinelli, D.J., Richardson, A.F., Lambeth, S.P., Mascaro, J., Schapiro, S.J. 2005. Chimpanzees are indifferent to the welfare of other group members. Nature 435: 1357-1359.

Silk, J.B. 2006. Practicing Hamilton’s Rule: Kin selection in primate groups. In: Cooperation in Primates and Humans. Mechanisms and Evolution. (P.M. Kappeler & C.P. van Schaik, eds.) Springer, Berlin, pp. 25-46.

Cheney, D.L., Seyfarth, R.M., Fischer, J., Beehner, J., Bergman, T., Johnson, S., Kitchen, D.M., Palombit, R.A., Rendall, D., & Silk, J.  2006.  Reproduction, mortality, and female reproductive success in chacma baboons of the Okavango Delta, Botswana.  In: Reproduction and Fitness in Baboons (L. Swedell, & S. Leigh, eds.).  Springer, Berlin, pp. 147-176.

Silk, J.B. 2006. Who are more helpful, humans or chimpanzees? Science 311: 1248-1249.

Silk, J.B., Brosnan, S.F., Vonk, J., Henrich, J., & Povinelli, D.J., Richardson, A.S., Lambeth, S.P., Mascaro, J., & Shapiro, S.J. 2006. Chimpanzee choice and prosociality (Reply). Nature 440: E6.

Silk, J.B., Altmann, J., & Alberts, S.C. 2006. Social relationships among adult female baboons (Papio cynocephalus)  I. Variation in the strength of social bonds. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 61: 183-195.

Silk, J.B., Alberts, S.C., Altmann, J. 2006. Social relationships among adult female baboons (Papio cynocephalus) II: Variation in the quality and stability of social bonds. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 61:197-204.

Silk, J.B. 2007. Animal behavior: conflict management is for the birds. Current Biology 17: R50-51.

Silk, J.B. 2007. The adaptive value of sociality in mammalian groups. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 362: 539-559.  

Reprinted in Emery, NJ, Clayton, NS & Frith, CD (Eds., 2007). Social Intelligence: From Brain to Culture. Oxford University Press: Oxford, pp. 89-121.

Silk, J.B. 2007. Who lived in the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness? In: Evolution of Mind (S.W. Gangestad &  J. A. Simpson , eds.) Guilford Press, New York, pp. 103-110.

Silk, J.B. 2007. Empathy, sympathy, and prosocial preferences in primates. In: Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology (R.I.M. Dunbar & L. Barrett, eds.) Oxford, Oxford University Press, pp. 115-126.

Silk, J.B. 2007. The strategic dynamics of cooperation in primate groups. Advances in the Study of Behaviour 37:1-42.

Duffy, K.G., Wrangham, R.W., Silk, J.B. 2007. Male chimpanzees exchange political upport for mating opportunities. Current Biology 21: R586-587.

Silk, J.B. 2007. Chimps don’t just get mad, they get even. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104:13537-13538.

Silk, J.B. 2007. Social components of fitness in primate groups. Science 317:1347-1351.

Vonk, J., Brosnan, S.F., Silk, J.B., Henrich, J., Richardson, A.S., Lambeth, S.P., Schapiro, S.J., Povinelli, D.J. 2008.  Chimpanzees do not take advantage of very low cost opportunities to deliver food to unrelated group members, Animal Behaviour 75:1757-1770.

McNutt, J.W., Silk, J.B. 2008.  Pup production, sex ratios, and survivorship in African wild dogs, Lycaon pictus. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 62:1061-1067.

Silk, J.B., Brown, G.R. 2008. Local resources competition and local resource enhancement shape primate birth sex ratios. Proceedings of the Royal Society London, Series B. 275: 1761-1765.

Silk, J.B. 2008. Social preferences in primates. In: Neuroeconomics: Decision Making and the Brain ( P. Glimcher, C. Camerer, E. Fehr, & R. Poldrack, eds.). Elsevier, London, pp. 267-282.

Silk, J.B. 2009. Q&A. Current Biology 19: R8-9

Brosnan, S.F., Silk, J.B., Henrich, J., Mareno, M.C., Lambeth, S.P., Schapiro, S.J. 2009. Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) do not develop contingent reciprocity in an experimental task. Animal Cognition 12: 587-597.

Cronin, K.A., Schroeder, K.K.E., Rothwell, E.S., Silk, J.B., Snowdon C.T. 2009. Cooperatively breeding cottontop tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) do not donate rewards to their long-term mates. Journal of Comparative Psychology 123: 231-241.

Frank, R., Silk, J.B. 2009. Grooming exchange between mothers and non-mothers: the price of natal attraction in wild baboons (Papio anubis). Behaviour 136: 889-906.

Frank, R., Silk, J.B. 2009. Impatient traders or contingent reciprocators? Evidence for the extended time course of grooming exchanges in baboons. Behaviour 136: 1123-1135.

Silk, J.B., Beehner, J.C., Berman, T.J., Crockford, C., Engh, A.L., Moscovice, L.R., Wittig, R.M., Seyfarth, R.M., & Cheney, D.L. 2009. The benefits of social capital: close social bonds among female baboons enhance offspring survival. Proceedings of the Royal Society London, Series B. 276: 3099-3014.

Silk, J.B. 2009. Commentary in Why We Cooperate by Michael Tomasello. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA. pp. 111-122.

Silk, J.B. 2009. Nepotistic cooperation in nonhuman primate groups. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 364: 3243-3254.

Kappeler, P.M., Silk, J.B., Burkart, J., van Schaik, C. P. 2010. Primate behavior and human universals: exploring the gap. In: Mind the Gap: The origins of human universals (P. Kappeler, J.B. Silk, eds). Springer Verlag, Berlin, pp. 3-15.

Silk, J.B., & Boyd, R. 2010. From grooming to giving blood: the origins of human altruism. In: Mind the Gap: The origins of human universals (P. Kappeler, J.B. Silk, eds). Springer Verlag, Berlin, pp. 223-244.

Whiten, A., McGrew, W.C., Aiello, L.C., Boesch, C., Boyd, R. Byrne, R.W., Dunbar, R.I.M., Matsuzawa, T., Silk, J.B., Tomasello, M., van Schaik, C.P.,  & Wrangham, R.W. 2010. Studying extant species to model our past. Science 327:410.

Silk, J.B. 2010. Review of The Age of Empathy: Nature’s Lessons for a Kinder Society by F.B.M. de Waal. American Scientist 98: 158-160.

Silk, J.B., Beehner, J.C., Berman, T.J., Crockford, C., Engh, A.L., Moscovice, L.R., Wittig, R.M., Seyfarth, R.M., & Cheney, D.L. 2010. Female chacma baboons form strong, equitable, and enduring social bonds.  Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 61: 197-204.

Silk, J.B., Beehner, J.C., Berman, T.J., Crockford, C., Engh, A.L., Moscovice, L.R., Wittig, R.M., Seyfarth, R.M., & Cheney, D.L. 2010. Strong and consistent social bonds enhance the longevity of female baboons. Current Biology 20: 1359-1361.

Silk, J.B. & Strum, S.C. 2010. Maternal condition does not influence birth sex ratios in anubis baboons (Papio anubis). Public Library of Science One 5: 312750.

Rosenbaum, S., Silk, J.B., & Stoinski, T. 2011. Male-immature relationships in multi-male groups of mountain gorillas (Gorilla berengei berengei). American Journal of Primatology 73: 356-365.

Silk, J.B. & House, B.R. 2011.

Silk, J.B. 2011. The path to sociality. Nature 479: 182-183.

Jensen, K., Silk, J.B., Andrews, K., Bshary, R., Cheney, D.L., Emery, N., Hemelrijk, C.K., Holekamp, K., Penn, D.C., Perner, J., & Tenfel, C.  2011. Social knowledge. In: Animal Thinking: Contemporary Issues in Comparative Cognition (R. Menzel, J. Fischer, eds.). MIT Press, Cambridge, pp. 267-291.

Xue, M., & Silk, J.B. 2012. The role of tracking and tolerance in relationships among friends. Evolution and Human Behavior 33: 17-25.

Silk, J.B., & House, B.R. 2012. The phylogeny and ontogeny of prosocial behavior. In: The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Evolutionary Psychology (J.Vonk, T. K. Shackelford, eds.), Oxford University Press, New York., pp. 381-398.

Silk, J.B., Alberts, S.C., Altmann, J., Cheney, D.L., & Seyfarth, R.M. 2012. Stability of partner choice among female baboons. Animal Behaviour 83: 1511-1518.

Cheney, D.L., Silk, J.B., & Seyfarth, R.M. 2012.  Evidence for intra-sexual selection in wild female baboons. Animal Behaviour 84: 21-27.

House, B.R., Henrich, J., Brosnan, S.F., & Silk, J.B. 2012. The ontogeny of human prosociality: behavioral experiments with children aged 3 to 8. Evolution and Human Behavior 33: 291-308.

Silk, J.B. 2012 The adaptive value of sociality. In: The Evolution of Primate Societies (J. Mitani, J. Call, P. Kappeler, R. Palombit, & J.B. Silk, eds.).  University of Chicago Press, Chicago, pp. 552-564.

Seyfarth, R.M., Silk, J.B., & Cheney, D.L. 2012. Variation in personality and fitness in wild female baboons. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science USA 109: 16980-16985.

Silk, J.B. 2013. The origins of the prosocial ape: insights from comparative studies of social preferences. In:  Navigating the Social World: A Developmental Perspective (M. R. Banaji, S. A. Gelman, eds.) Oxford University Press, pp. 367-370.

Panchanathan, K., Frankenhuis, W.E., & Silk, J.B. 2013.The bystander effect in an n-person dictator game. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 120: 285–297.

Silk, J.B., Brosnan, S.F., Henrich, J., Lambeth S.P., Shapiro, S.  2013. Chimpanzees share food for many reasons: the role of kinship, reciprocity, social bonds and harassment on food transfers. Animal Behaviour 85: 941-947.

House, B.R., Silk, J.B., Henrich, J., H.C. Barrett, Scelza, B., Boyette, A., Hewlett, B., & Laurence, S. 2013. The ontogeny of prosocial behavior across diverse cultures. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110: 14586–14591

Silk, J.B. 2013. Reciprocal altruism. Current Biology 23: R827-828.

Henrich, J. & Silk, J.B. 2013. Interpretative problems with chimpanzee ultimatum game. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 10.1073/ pnas.1307007110

House, B.R., Henrich, J., Senecka, B., Silk, J.B. 2013. The development of contingent reciprocity in children. Evolution and Human Behavior 34:86-93.

Silk, J.B.  2013. Guest editor of special issue of Evolutionary Anthropology: A tribute to Sarah Blaffer Hrdy and Jeanne Altmann. Vol 22.

Silk, J.B. 2013. Introduction to special issue, p. 197.

Van Schaik, C.P., Silk, J.B. The contributions of Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, pp. 198-199.

Alberts, S.C., Silk, J.B.  The contributions of Jeanne Altmann, pp. 200-201.

Silk, J.B., Cheney, D.L., Seyfarth, R.M. 2013. A practical guide to the study of social relationships, Evolutionary Anthropology 22: 213–225.

Jensen, K. & Silk, J.B. 2013. Moral man, amoral monkey: the roots of human moral sentiments. In: Handbook of Moral Development (M.A. Killen & J. Smetana, eds.) Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp. 475-494.

Seyfarth, R.M., Silk, J. B., Cheney, D.L. 2014. Social bonds in female baboons: The interaction among personality, kinship, and rank. Animal Behaviour 87, 23-29.

House, B. R., Silk, J. B., Lambeth, S. P., Schapiro, S. J. 2014. Task design influences prosociality in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Public Library of Science One 9(9), e103422.

Silk, J.B. 2014. The evolutionary roots of lethal conflict. Nature 513: 321-322.

Silk, J.B. 2014. The roots of prosocial preferences. In: Understanding Moral Sentiments: Darwinian Perspectives? (H. Putnam, S. Neiman, &  J.P. Schloss, eds.) Piscataway, NJ: Transaction, pp. 9-26.

Silk, J.B. 2014. Evolutionary perspectives on the links between close social bonds, health, and fitness. In: Sociality, Hierarchy, Health: Comparative Biodemography (M. Weinstein & M.A. Lane, eds.). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, Washington, DC, pp. 121-143.

Scelza, B. A., Silk, J.B. 2014. Fosterage as a system of dispersed cooperative breeding: Evidence from the Himba. Human Nature 25(4), 448-464.

Silk, J.B. 2014. Mother knows best. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science USA 111:18106-18107.

Silk, J.B., Beehner, J., Holekamp, K., Perry, S. 2015 Unpaid researchers: Fieldwork grants would up diversity (Commentary). Nature 523:158.

Rosenbaum, S., Hirwa, J.P., Silk, J.B., Vigilant, L., & Stoinski,T.  2015. Male rank, not paternity, predicts male-immature relationships in mountain gorillas,Gorilla gorilla beringei. Animal Behaviour 104:13-24.

Rosenbaum, S., Hirwa J.P., Silk, J.B., Vigilant, L., Stoinski, T.S. 2016. Infant mortality risk and paternity certainty are associated with postnatal maternal behavior toward silverback mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei). Public Library of Science One 11(2): 11(2): e0147441.

Rosenbaum S, Hirwa JP, Silk JB, & Stoinski TS. 2016.  Relationships between adult male and maturing mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) persist across developmental stages and social upheaval. Ethology 122: 134-150.

Silk, J.B., House, B.R. 2016. The evolution of altruistic social preferences in human groups. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 371: 20150097.

Silk, J.B. 2016. Animal Behaviour: Friendship enhances trust in chimpanzees. Current Biology 26: R76-78.

Silk, J.B. 2016. Building strong bonds. Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences LXIX:80-81.

Silk, J.B. 2016. Taxonomies of cognition. Nature 532: 176.

Cheney, D. L., Silk, J. B., & Seyfarth, R. M. 2016. Network connections, dyadic bonds and fitness in wild female baboons. Royal Society Open Science, 3(7), 160255.

Silk, J.B. 2016. Review of  Mammal Societies. Nature 535:228.

Silk, J.B., Seyfarth, R.M., & Cheney, D.L. 2016. Strategic use of affiliative vocalizations by wild female baboons. PLoS One 11 (10), e0163978.

Silk, J.B., Kappeler, P.M. 2017. Sociality in primates. In: Comparative Social Evolution (D. Rubenstein, P. Abott, eds.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 

Silk, J.B., Roberts, E.R., Barrett, B.J., Patterson, S.K., Strum, S.C. 2017. Female–male relationships influence the form of female–female relationships in olive baboons, Papio anubis. Animal Behaviour 131, 89-98.

Research Activity
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASM 579Proposal Writing
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 584Internship
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASB 799Dissertation
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
ASM 246Human Origins
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASB 799Dissertation
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
ASM 394Special Topics
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 584Internship
ASM 590Reading and Conference
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASM 592Research
ASB 592Research
ASM 790Reading and Conference
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASM 792Research
ASB 792Research
ASM 799Dissertation
ASB 799Dissertation
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASM 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 584Internship
ASM 590Reading and Conference
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASM 592Research
ASB 592Research
ASM 790Reading and Conference
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASM 792Research
ASB 792Research
ASM 799Dissertation
ASB 799Dissertation
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
ASM 394Special Topics
BIO 394Special Topics
ASB 484Internship
ASM 484Internship
ASM 493Honors Thesis
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASM 499Individualized Instruction
ASM 579Proposal Writing
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASM 590Reading and Conference
ASM 592Research
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASM 790Reading and Conference
ASM 792Research
ASB 792Research
ASM 799Dissertation
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
ASB 484Internship
ASM 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASM 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 493Honors Thesis
ASM 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 580Practicum
ASB 584Internship
ASM 590Reading and Conference
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASB 592Research
ASM 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASM 790Reading and Conference
ASM 792Research
ASB 792Research
ASM 799Dissertation
ASB 799Dissertation
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
ASM 455Primate Behavior Laboratory
ASB 484Internship
ASM 484Internship
ASB 492Honors Directed Study
ASM 492Honors Directed Study
ASM 493Honors Thesis
ASM 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASB 580Practicum
ASM 590Reading and Conference
ASB 590Reading and Conference
ASM 592Research
ASB 592Research
ASB 790Reading and Conference
ASM 790Reading and Conference
ASB 792Research
ASM 792Research
ASM 799Dissertation
Fall 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
ASM 443Primatology
ASM 484Internship
ASM 492Honors Directed Study
ASM 493Honors Thesis
ASM 499Individualized Instruction
ASM 543Primatology
ASM 590Reading and Conference
ASM 592Research
ASM 790Reading and Conference
ASM 792Research
ASM 799Dissertation
Spring 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
ASM 484Internship
ASM 492Honors Directed Study
ASB 499Individualized Instruction
ASM 543Primatology
ASM 590Reading and Conference
Presentations

The adaptive value of social bonds. Preconference, Society for Research in Child Development,  17 April 2013, Seattle WA

The phylogeny and ontogeny of altruistic social preferences. Workshop on Cooperation in Humans, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia,  6-8 June 2013.

The adaptive value of social bonds for female baboons, Plenary lecture, International Congress of Mammalogy, 11-16 August 2013, Belfast, UK.

The adaptive value of social bonds. Keynote lecture of the Ninth Göttingen Freilandtage, Gottingen, Germany, 3-6 December 2013.

The adaptive value of social bonds. New York Consortium on Evolutionary Primatology, CUNY Graduate School, New York, 10 December 2013.

The adaptive value of social bonds. Workshop on Cross-Species Comparisons of Social Environments, Social Behaviors, and their Effects on Health and Longevity, National Research Council, Washington DC, 8-9 April 2014.

Negotiating social bonds in baboons. Plenary lecture, EVOLANG, Vienna, Austria, 13-17 April 2014.

The phylogeny and ontogeny of altruistic social preferences. University of Maryland, 13 November 2014.

The evolution of altruistic social preferences. Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science, University of California, Irvine, 22 May 2015.

The origins of the prosocial ape. Invited lecture,  3rd Toulouse Economics and Biology Workshop: Evolution and Morality,  Toulouse, France 4-5 June 2015.

Building strong bonds: patterns, mechanisms, and adaptive outcomes. Plenary lecture, 34th International Ethological Conference, Cairns, Australia, 9-14 August 2015.

The Adaptive Value of Social Bonds. ScienceCafe lecture, Phoenix Public Library, 10 December 2015.

The origins of the prosocial ape. Department of Biological Anthropology, Duke University, 4 March 2016

The origins of the prosocial ape. Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, 5 April 2016.

Sociality, cognition, and communication in nonhuman primates, co-organizer of symposium at meeting of the International Primatological Society, Chicago, IL August 2016  co-organized with J. Beehner, T. Bergman, & J. Fischer.

The origins of the prosocial ape. Margo Wilson Memorial Lecture, McMaster University, 6 October 2016. 

 

Honors / Awards

Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Fellow, Animal Behavior Society

Fellow, American Anthropological Association

Editorships

Editorial board: Human Nature, International Journal of Primatology

Advisory board: Primates

Consulting editor: Human Nature

Professional Associations

Animal Behavior Society, American Association of Science, Human Behavior and Evolution Society

Service

Member, Scientific Executive Committee, Leakey Foundation 

Work History

1984-1986 Emory University 1986-2012 University of California, Los Angeles 2012-present Arizona State University