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Alexander Halavais

Associate Professor
Faculty, WEST Campus, Mailcode 3051
Assoc Professor
Faculty, WEST Campus, Mailcode 3051
Biography

Alexander Halavais is a researcher, teacher, and innovator interested in ways of helping form communities of creativity, freedom and justice. In particular, he helps people to discover ways in which social media change the nature of scholarship and learning and allow for new forms of collaboration and self-government.

He is an associate professor in the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Arizona State University, where he directs the master's program in social technologies. Previously, he taught in the master's program in interactive communications at Quinnipiac University and directed a master's program in informatics at the University at Buffalo (SUNY). He has published more than 50 articles and book chapters on how social media relate to social change, as well as a book introducing the social role of search engines. He previously served as president of the Association of Internet Researchers, works with the Digital Media and Learning Hub based at the University of California Humanities Research Institute, and is affiliated with the Learning Sciences Institute at ASU, among others. He received a doctorate in communications from the University of Washington, and a bachelor's in political science from the University of California at Irvine.

His current work includes research on the role of microcredentials in online publics, as well as work on a book tentatively titled "All Seeing."

He has provided expert commentary for dozens of newspapers and magazines around the world, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Wired, The Times of London and Asahi Shimbun, and has been a discussant on television and radio programs in the US, Canada, Australia, and Austria. His teaching was featured in Time, and interviews have been published in the Washington Post and Fast Company.

In addition to blogging at “a thaumaturgical compendium” and course related blogs, he tweets @halavais.

His perfect day would be spent with his wife and two children, and would include a trip to the movies, a great meal, a curvy drive in a fast car, and a cold margarita on a warm beach with a nice breeze and a good book. His dream is to someday start a school for misfits and misfitting.

Education
  • Ph.D. Communications, University of Washington 2001
  • B.A. Political Science, University of California-Irvine 1993
Research Interests

Interested in the ways in which platforms, algorithms, and data structures shape and change social interaction, and especially how they affect and are affected by the formation of communities for learning and political action.

Publications

Halavais, A. (2017). Search engine society, 2nd ed. Cambridge: Polity Press. First edition published in Japanese by Seidosha Press (trans. A. Tabata, 2010), and in Polish by Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN (trans. T. Płudowski, 2012).

Halavais, A. (2016). The blogophere and its problems: Web 2.0 undermining civic webspaces. First Monday, 21(6), a. 11. http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/fm.v21i6.6788

Halavais, A. (2016). Computer-supported collaborative learning. In K. Bruhn Jensen and R. T. Craig (Eds.), International encyclopedia of communication theory and philosophy. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

Halavais, A. (2015). Social search. In P.H. Ang and R. Mansfield (Eds.), International encyclopedia of digital communications and society. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

Halavais, A. (2015). Bigger sociological imaginations: Framing big social data theory and methods. Information, Communication, & Society, 18(5), 583-594.

Kwon, K. H., Halavais, A. & Havener, S. (2015). Tweeting badges: User motivations for displaying achievement in publicly networked environments. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 18(2), 93-100.

Halavais, A. (2014). The Calibans at night. In E. Finn (Ed.), Knowledge systems, Future of the book, vol. 2 (pp. 7-12). Tempe: Arizona State University.

Halavais, A. & Garrido, M. (2014). Twitter as the people’s microphone: Emergence of authorities during protest tweeting. In M. McCaughey (Ed.), Cyberactivism on the participatory web (pp. 117-139). London: Routledge.

Halavais, A., Kwon, K.H., Havener, S. & Striker, J. (2014). Badges of friendship: Social influence and badge acquisition on Stack Overflow,” Proceedings of the 47th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Systems Sciences.

Halavais, A. (2013). Home made big data‽ Challenges and opportunities for participatory social research. First Monday, 18(10), a. 7.

Halavais, A. (2013). Teaching and learning with social media. In T. Senft & J. Hunsinger, Routledge handbook of social media (pp. 93-106). London: Routledge.

Halavais, A. (2013). Search and networked attention. In J. Hartley, J. Burgess, & A. Bruns (Eds.), A companion to new media dynamics (pp. 249-260). New York: Wiley-Blackwell.

Halavais, A. (2013). And who Is Demosthenes? In. D. E. Wittkower & L. Rush (Eds.), Ender’s Game and philosophy (pp. 125-132). Chicago: Open Court.

Halavais, A. (2013). Structure of Twitter: Social and technical. In K. Weller, A. Bruns, J. Burgess, & M. Mahrt (Eds.), Twitter and society (pp. 29-42). New York: Peter Lang.

Halavais, A. (2012). A genealogy of badges: Inherited meaning and monstrous moral hybrids. Information, Communication, and Society, 15(3), 354-373.

Halavais, A. (2012). Blogging as a Free Frame of Reference. In A. Delwiche & J. Jacobs Henderson (Eds.), The participatory cultures handbook (pp. 109-119). London: Routledge.

Halavais, A. (2011). Open up online research. Nature, 480(8 December), 174-175.

Halavais, A. (2011). Blogging course texts: Enhancing our traditional use of textual materials. In T. Scholz, Learning through digital media: Experiments in technology and pedagogy (pp. 17-26). New York: Institute for Distributed Creativity.

Halavais, A. (2011). Para achar agulha no palheiro (To find a needle in a haystack). In S. Fragoso (Ed. and Trans.), Métodos de pesquisa para internet (Internet research methods; pp. 11-16). Porto Alegre: Editora Sulina.

Halavais, A. (2010). The evolution of US white nationalism on the web. In N. Brügger (Ed.), Web history (pp. 83-104). New York: Peter Lang.

Halavais, A. (2009). Do dugg diggers Digg diligently? Feedback as motivation in collaborative moderation systems. Information, Communication, and Society, 12(3), 444-459.

Cheong, P. H., Halavais, A. & Kwon, K. H. (2008). The chronicles of me: Understanding blogging as a religious practice. Journal of Media and Religion, 7.

Halavais, A. (2008). The hyperlink as organizing principle. In J. Turow & L. Tsui (Eds.), The hyperlinked society: Questioning connections in the digital age (pp. 39-55). Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Halavais, A. & Lackaff, D. (2008). An analysis of topical coverage of Wikipedia. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(2), 429-440.

Spratt, M. Bullock, C. F., Baldasty, G., Clark, F., Halavais, A., McCluskey, M. & Schrenk, S. (2007). News, race, and the status quo: The case of Emmett Louis Till. Howard Journal of Communications, 18(2), 169-162.

Halavais, A. (2007). Convergence of newspaper coverage of US presidential elections: 1992-2000. In P. Napoli (Ed.), Media diversity and localism: Meaning and metrics (pp. 97-112). Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Lin, J., Halavais, A. & Zhang, B. (2007). The blog network in America: Blogs as indicators of relationships among US cities. Connections, 27(2), 15-23.

Halavais, A. (2006). Scholarly blogging: Moving toward the visible college. In A. Bruns & J. Jacobs (Eds.), Uses of blogs (pp. 117-126). New York: Peter Lang.

Halavais, A. (2006). Weblogs and collaborative web publishing as learning spaces. In J. Weiss, J. Nolan, J. Hunsinger, & P. Trifonas (Eds.), International handbook of virtual learning environments ( v. 4, pp. 1215-1235). Amsterdam: Springer.

Halavais, A. (2006). Blogs and the “social weather.” In D. Satish & K. Rajesh Prabhakar (Eds.), Blogs: Emerging communication media. Hyderabad: The ICFAI University Press.

Lin, J. & Halavais, A. (2006). Geographical distribution of weblogs in the United States. Webology, 3(4).

Halavais, A. (2005). Social informatics: Beyond emergence. Bulletin of American Society for Information Science and Technology, 31(5).

Halavais, A. (2005). Small pornographies, ACM SIGGROUP Bulletin, 25(2), 19-22.

Halavais, A. (Ed., 2005). Cyberporn & society. Dubuque: Kendall/Hunt Publishing.

Halavais, A. & Lin, J. (2004). Mapping the blogosphere in America, Blogging Ecosystem Workshop, Thirteenth International World Wide Web Conference, New York, May.

Garrido, M. & Halavais, A. (2003). Mapping networks of support for the Zapatista movement. In M. McCaughey & M. D. Ayers (Eds.), Cyberactivism: Online activism in theory and practice (pp. 165-184). London: Routledge.

Halavais, A. (2002). Do-it-yourself journalism. The web as news after September 11. Washington, Pew Internet and American Life Project.

Halavais, A. (2000). National borders on the world wide web. New Media & Society, 2(1), 7-28. Reprinted as a supplemental reading for McQuail’s Mass Communication Theory.

Fall 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
CMN 557Communication and Technology
STC 590Reading and Conference
STC 593Applied Project
STC 595Continuing Registration
Spring 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
STC 537Community Informatics
STC 590Reading and Conference
CMN 590Reading and Conference
STC 593Applied Project
JHR 593Applied Project
CMN 593Applied Project
STC 595Continuing Registration
Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
STC 510Applied Social Technology
STC 530Technology and Collaboration
STC 590Reading and Conference
STC 595Continuing Registration
Summer 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
SBS 374Internet Cultures and Politics
SOC 374Internet Cultures and Politics
STC 590Reading and Conference
STC 595Continuing Registration
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
STC 525Politics and Social Technology
STC 590Reading and Conference
STC 593Applied Project
STC 595Continuing Registration
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
COM 492Honors Directed Study
COM 498Pro-Seminar
STC 510Applied Social Technology
STC 590Reading and Conference
STC 593Applied Project
STC 595Continuing Registration
STC 598Special Topics
Summer 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
SBS 374Internet Cultures and Politics
SOC 374Internet Cultures and Politics
STC 590Reading and Conference
STC 595Continuing Registration
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
STC 537Community Informatics
STC 590Reading and Conference
STC 593Applied Project
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
COM 494Special Topics
STC 510Applied Social Technology
STC 590Reading and Conference
STC 598Special Topics
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
SOC 394Special Topics
SBS 394Special Topics
POS 394Special Topics
ASB 394Special Topics
COM 394Special Topics
STC 530Technology and Collaboration
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
SOC 394Special Topics
ASB 394Special Topics
SBS 394Special Topics
COM 394Special Topics
STC 510Applied Social Technology
Work History

Arizona State University (2012 - Present)

Quinnipiac University (2006-2012)

State University of New York at Buffao (2001-2006)

Service
  • MA in Social Technologies, Director (2015, 2016 - Present)
  • Internet History, Editorial Board (2016 - Present)
  • Information, Communication, and Society, Editorial Board (2010 - Present)
  • New Media & Society, Editorial Board (2004 - Present)
  • Association of Internet Researchers, President (2011 - 2013)
  • Association of Internet Researchers, Executive Committee (2005 - 2015)