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Leah Doane

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Associate Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 1104
Biography

Leah Doane is a developmental psychologist and Associate Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University. She is also currently head of the Developmental Area in the Department of Psychology. Dr. Doane received her Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology from Cornell University and her Masters and Ph.D. in Human Development and Social Policy from Northwestern University. She also completed a postdoctoral appointment at the University of Chicago in Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience. Dr. Doane investigates the physiological mechanisms underlying developmental psychopathology and everyday stressful experiences in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. She has training in human development and developmental psychophysiology with expertise in collecting, measuring and modeling physiological markers of stress in both lab and naturalistic settings including measures of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis activity and objective sleep. Through numerous collaborations, Dr. Doane also incorporates culturally- and genetically-informed designs for studying daily associations among socio-emotional experiences, physiology and sleep in the prediction of subsequent health and academic achievement. Further, her newest program of research focuses on these processes in Latino youth and families. Dr. Doane is currently a William T. Grant Foundation Scholar and is funded by the foundation, as well as the Helios Education Foundation, for her work examining cultural influences on the Latino transition to college. She is also supported by the National Institutes for Health (NICHD) for a study examining the social and genetic contributions to children’s sleep, health and academic success. Finally, she currently serves as co-PI on an Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences (ARI) grant on cultural identities.

Education
  • Ph.D. Human Development and Social Policy, Northwestern University 2008
  • M.A. Human Development and Social Policy, Northwestern University 2006
  • A.B. Psychology, Cornell University 2002
Research Interests

Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood
Ecological and Ambulatory Assessments
Physiological Stress Activity
Sleep
Transition to College

Department of Psychology Research LabAdolescent Stress and Emotion Lab

 

Publications
  • Adam, E. K., Doane, L. D., Zinbarg, R., Craske, M., & Mineka, S. Prospective prediction of mood and anxiety disorders from diurnal cortisol patterns in late adolescence. Psychoneuroendocrinology (2010).
  • DeSantis, A., Adam, E. K., Mendelsohn, K., & Doane, L.D. Concordance between reported and actual wake-up times in ambulatory salivary cortisol research: Implications for the cortisol response to awakening. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine (2010).
  • Doane, L.D. & Adam, E.K. Loneliness and cortisol: Momentary, day-to-day, and trait associations. Psychoneuroendocrinology (2010).
  • Doane, L.D., Kremen, W.S., Eaves, L., Eisen, S.A., Hauger, R., Hellhammer, D., Levine, S., Lupien, S., Lyons, M., Mendoza, S., Prom-Wormley, E., Xian, H., York, T., Franz, C.E. & Jacobson, K. Associations between jet lag and basal cortisol rhythms the day after short distance travel. Health Psychology (2010).
  • Mor, N., Doane, L.D., Adam, E., Mineka, S., Zinbarg, R., Craske, M. & Griffith, J. Greater negative emotion associated with self-oriented thoughts in MDD: A diary study. Cognition and Emotion (2010).
Research Activity
Fall 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 492Honors Directed Study
BIO 493Honors Thesis
MIC 495Undergraduate Research
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
PSY 592Research
PSY 599Thesis
PSY 680Practicum
Summer 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
Spring 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 493Honors Thesis
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 498Pro-Seminar
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
BIO 499Individualized Instruction
Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 492Honors Directed Study
BIO 493Honors Thesis
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Summer 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 341Developmental Psychology
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 493Honors Thesis
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 492Honors Directed Study
BIO 493Honors Thesis
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 492Honors Directed Study
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 341Developmental Psychology
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 498Pro-Seminar
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
PSY 591Seminar
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
PSY 399Supervised Research
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
PSY 499Individualized Instruction
PSY 591Seminar
Presentations
  • Vrshek-Schallhorn, S., Doane, L., & Adam, E.K. Diurnal Cortisol Rhythm as a Prospective Predictor of Major Depressive Disorder over a Three Year Follow-up. the Society for Research in Psychopathology Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA (Oct 2010).
  • Doane, L.D. & Adam, E.K. Associations among loneliness and cortisol in a community sample of late adolescents. Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence, Philadelphia, PA (Mar 2010).