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Stefan Stantchev

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Associate Professor
Faculty, WEST Campus, Mailcode 2151
Assoc Professor
Faculty, WEST Campus, Mailcode 2151
Biography

Stefan Stantchev earned his Ph.D. in history at The University of Michigan in 2009 and joined the faculty of New College shortly thereafter.  Previously, he had completed an MA in Medieval Studies from the Central European University, Budapest, Hungary, and an MA in History from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria. 

Dr. Stantchev's research interests focus on the religious and economic factors that shaped power relations within Europe and throughout the Mediterranean, circa 1000 to circa 1500. His work thus engages topics that are often treated separately, such as economic and church history, foreign policy and religious identity, family structures and networks of economic activity. It also transcends the boundaries typically drawn between Western, Byzantine, Ottoman, and Balkan history.  Consequently, his teaching interests are equally broad: ancient, medieval, and modern Europe, Byzantine, Balkan, and Ottoman history.

His first book, Spiritual Rationality: Papal Embargo as Cultural Practice (Oxford University Press, 2014), offers the first book-length study of embargo in a pre-modern period and provides a unique exploration into the domestic implications of this tool of foreign policy. During this time of an increasing papal role within Christian society, the church employed restrictions on trade with Muslims, pagans, 'heretics', 'schismatics', disobedient Catholic communities and individual Jews in order to facilitate papally-endorsed warfare against external enemies and to discipline internal foes. Various trade bans were originally promulgated as individual responses to specific circumstances. These restrictions, however, were shaped by the premise that sin and the defense of the decorum of the faith and Christendom condoned, or even required, papal intervention into the lives of the laity and by the text-based approach of popes and canonists.  Papal embargo, consequently, was not only the sum total of individual trade bans but also a legal and moral discourse that classified exchanges into legitimate and illegitimate ones, compelled merchants to distinguish clearly between themselves as (Roman) Christians and a multitude of others as non-Christians, and helped order symbolically both the relationships between the two groups and those between church and laity. Papal embargo's chief relevance thus lay within Christian society itself, where it functioned as an intangible pastoral staff. While sixteenth-century developments undermined it as a policy tool and a moral discourse alike, papal embargo inscribed the notion of the immorality of trade with the enemy into European thought.

Dr. Stantchev's next book will explore the relations between Venice, Genoa, and the Ottoman Empire between ca. 1453 and ca. 1517. Dr. Stantchev's immediate research goal is the completion of two book chapters that he has been invited to write (for different volumes): one on Venice's relations with the Ottomans between 1378 and 1453 and another on the Genoese economy (in co-authorship with Jeffrey Miner).  His work on church history continues in collaboration with Benjamin Weber and traces the evolution of a set of ecclesiastical policies in the decisions of local synods, papal letters, and penitential manuals.  

Dr. Stantchev has made presentations at conferences around the United States. He has conducted research at many archives and libraries, including the Vatican Archives and the Vatican Library in Vatican City, and the Italian State Archives in Venice and in Genoa.  A former fellow of the Institute for the Humanities at the University of Michigan, Dr. Stantchev has been  the recipient of numerous fellowships and research grants from a variety of sources, including the Social Science Research Council, the Medieval Academy of America, and the American Historical Association.

Stefan Stantchev has served on the Advisory Board of the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies since 2012.

Refereed publications:

Stefan Stantchev, Spiritual Rationality: Papal Embargo as Cultural Practice (Oxford University Press, 2014).

Stefan Stantchev, "Apply to Muslims What Was Said of the Jews: Popes and Canonists between a Taxonomy of Otherness and Infidelitas," Law and History Review 32 (2014, 1): 65-96.

Stefan Stantchev, “The Medieval Origins of Embargo as a Policy Tool.”  History of Political Thought 33 (2012, 3): 373-99.

Stefan Stantchev, “Inevitable Conflict or Opportunity to Explore?  The Mechanics of Venice’s  Embargo against Mehmed II and the Problem of Western-Ottoman Trade after 1453.”  Mediaevalia 32 (2011): 155-96.

Stefan Stantchev.  “Devedo: the Venetian Response to Sultan Mehmed II in the Venetian-Ottoman Conflict of 1462-79.”  Mediterranean Studies 19 (2010): 43-66.

Research Interests

 

Medieval Europe

Medieval and Early Modern Mediterranean

Identity and Intercultural Contacts

Economic and Social History

Publications
  • Stefan Stantchev. Apply to Muslims What Was Said of the Jews: Popes and Canonists between a Taxonomy of Otherness and Infidelitas". Law and History Review (2014).
  • Stefan Stantchev. Spiritual Rationality: Papal Embargo as Cultural Practice. (2014).
  • . . Review of: Relazioni religiose nel Mediterraneo. Schiavi, redentori, mediatori (2013).
  • . . Review of: William of Adam: How to Defeat the Saracens. Guillelmus Ade, Tractatus quomodo Sarraceni sunt expugnandi (2013).
  • Stefan Stantchev. THE MEDIEVAL ORIGINS OF EMBARGO AS A POLICY TOOL. History of Political Thought (2012).
  • Stefan Stantchev. "Inevitable Conflict or Opportunity to Explore? The Mechanics of Venice’s Embargo against Mehmed II and the Problem of Western-Ottoman trade after 1453". Mediaevalia (2011).
  • Stefan Stantchev. "Devedo: the Venetian Response to Sultan Mehmed II in the Venetian-Ottoman Conflict of 1462-79.". Mediterranean Studies 19 (2010): 43-66 (2010).
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 350Later Middle Ages
MAS 501Mthd Interdisciplinary Inquiry
MAS 502Perspectives in Interdisc Stud
Summer 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 360The Crusades
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 495Methods of Historical Inquiry
HST 499Individualized Instruction
MAS 598Special Topics
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 350Later Middle Ages
HST 499Individualized Instruction
MAS 502Perspectives in Interdisc Stud
Summer 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 360The Crusades
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 495Methods of Historical Inquiry
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 350Later Middle Ages
HST 430Ottoman Emp/Classical Period
Summer 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 350Later Middle Ages
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 360The Crusades
HST 495Methods of Historical Inquiry
HST 499Individualized Instruction
HST 590Reading and Conference
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 350Later Middle Ages
HST 362Sex&Society-Classical&Med Euro
HST 499Individualized Instruction
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 360The Crusades
HST 495Methods of Historical Inquiry
Fall 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 102Western Civilization
HST 350Later Middle Ages
Spring 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
HST 394Special Topics
HST 498Pro-Seminar
HST 499Individualized Instruction
Presentations
  • Stefan Stantchev. "Beyond Trade and Crusade: The Republic of Venice and the Ottoman Enterprise, ca. 1378-ca. 1453". Medieval Brown Bag Lecture, The University of Michigan (Dec 2014).
  • Stefan Stantchev. Trade, Discourse, and Opportunity. Minorities in the Mediterranean Symposium (Mar 2014).
Service
  • Studies in Medieval and Renaissance History, Editorial Board Member (2014 - Present)
  • Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Advisory Board Member (2012 - Present)
  • ASU Senate, HArCS Representative to ASU Senate (2014 - 2017)
  • Emergency Preparedness Committee, member (2014 - 2015)
  • Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Advisory Board Member (2012 - 2015)
  • Oxford University Press, Book Proposal Evaluator (2014 - 2014)
  • Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Advisory Board Member (2012 - 2014)
  • National Endowment for the Humanities, Faculty (2013 - 2013)
  • Medieval Academy of America 2013 meeting, multiple sessions organizer (2012 - 2013)
  • Institute for Humanities Research, Advisory Board Member (2012 - 2012)
  • Social Relations and Cross-Cultural Communication. The University of Michigan, Mar 16-17, 2012., Symposium organizer. (2011 - 2012)