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Joshua LaBaer

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Exec Director
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 6401
Exec Director
University Staff, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 5001
Exec Director
University Staff, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 5001
Exec Director
University Staff, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 5001
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 6401
Biography

Joshua LaBaer is one of the nation’s foremost investigators in the rapidly expanding field of personalized diagnostics. His efforts focus on the discovery and validation of biomarkers — unique molecular fingerprints of disease — which can provide early warning for those at risk of major illnesses, including cancer and diabetes. Formerly founder and director of the Harvard Institute of Proteomics, LaBaer was recruited to ASU’s Biodesign Institute as the first Piper Chair in Personalized Medicine in 2009 . The Virginia G. Piper Center for Personalized Diagnostics (VGPCPD) has a highly multidisciplinary staff of molecular biologists, cell biologists, biochemists, software engineers, database specialists, bioinformaticists, biostatisticians, and automation engineers.  VGPCPD applies open reading frame clones to the high throughput (HT) study of protein function.  In addition, his group invented a novel protein microarray technology, Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array, which has been used widely for biomedical research, including the recent discovery of a panel of 28 autoantibody biomarkers that may aid the early diagnosis of breast cancer. He was named Executive Director of the Biodesign Institute in March 2017. LaBaer earned his medical degree and a doctorate in biochemistry and biophysics, from the University of California, San Francisco.  He completed his medical residency at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and a clinical fellowship in oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, both in Boston. He has contributed more than 150 original research publications, reviews and chapters. LaBaer is an associate editor of the Journal of Proteome Research, a recent member of the National Cancer Institute’s Board of Scientific Advisors, Chair of the Early Detection Research Network Steering Committee and recent president of the U.S. Human Proteome Organization.  

Education
  • 1990, M.D. University of California School of Medicine
  • 1989, Ph.D. Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California School of Medicine
Research Interests

Personalized Medicine

The successful future of medicine will depend on ensuring that patients are managed with treatments that are appropriate for each individual, a concept referred to as personalized medicine. In the 18th century a physician's diagnosis was often a restatement of the symptom, for example a patient was diagnosed with "the colic" or "the diarrhea." Advances in medicine in the 20th century led us to recognize that there were underlying causes that resulted in the same symptoms. Diarrhea could be caused by an autoimmune phenomenon, like inflammatory bowel disease, or it could be due to an infection like cholera or shigella. Treatments, which are best directed at the cause, would obviously be quite different for autoimmune disease and infection. Now, in the 21st century, molecular medicine is teaching us that what we thought of as single diseases only a few years ago comprise many different molecular variants. What was once simply breast cancer is now recognized to be more than a half dozen different diseases. Each responds differently to a given therapy and carries a different prognosis. To best manage patients, personalized medicine rests on two broad and equally important pillars. First, it relies on novel therapeutics that are tailored to treat the specific molecular causes of each individual disease. Academic and pharmaceutical company laboratories are working hard at defining these individual pathways. Second, diagnostic tests are needed to quickly identify the specific disease an individual has and which treatment would be most appropriate. The two approaches are mutually dependent. A specific therapy only makes sense if there is a test to tell patients if they will benefit from it.

Broadly, our laboratory is interested is using a multidisciplinary approach to discovering new tools that will help advance the cause of personalized medicine (Figure 1). The completion of the human genome project signaled the start of a dramatic acceleration in the pace of biological research. With the application of large scale and high-throughput approaches, biology embraced a new era of technology development and information collection. One of the most compelling next steps has been learning the functional roles for all proteins. We base our work in the high throughput study of proteins, a next generation field called proteomics. Proteins provide the verbs to biology; they are its engines and its bricks and mortar. Most human disease is the result of protein dysfunction and nearly all drugs either act through proteins or are themselves proteins.

We initiated a project to create a sequence-verified collection of full-length cDNAs representing all coding regions for the human and several model organisms in a vector system that is protein expression-ready. By using a recombination-based vector system, users are able to execute the automated transfer of thousands of genes into any protein expression vector overnight. This repository, called the FLEXGene Repository (for Full-Length Expression-ready), enables the high-throughput screening of protein function for the entire set (or any customized subset) of human genes using any method of in vitro or in vivo expression. Our FLEXGene Repository has been built using an "open source" technology and is available to all biologists. Our projects engage a wide range of tools from molecular biology, biochemistry, software engineering, informatics, medicine, chemical engineering, cell biology, database development and robotics in order to understand the functions of proteins and how they dysfunction in disease. Our strategy promises not only to improve therapeutic care by ensuring that patients are treated with right medicine for them, but also to greatly reduce the unnecessary side effects, the cost and the lost time of treating patients with therapies that are unlikely to be successful.

Nucleic Acid-Programmable Protein Array (NAPPA)

A powerful way to study protein function in vitro is through the use of protein microarrays. Protein microarrays display proteins in high spatial density on a microscopic surface. They can be used to test a variety of functions of many proteins simultaneously including interactions with other macromolecules, functional activity, and their suitability as substrates of enzymes. Historically, these arrays have been produced by expressing and purifying proteins, which are then printed on the array surface. However, many challenges accompany this approach including the difficulty in purifying many proteins, a dynamic range in yields that spans several orders of magnitude (which is reflected in the widely varying amount of protein displayed on the array surface) and the danger or proteins becoming unfolded during the many manipulations, such as purification, storage and printing.

To avoid these challenges and to produce the most functional arrays possible, we have developed a novel protein microarray technology, called Nucleic Acid-Programmable Protein Array (NAPPA), which replaces the complex process of spotting purified proteins with the simple process of spotting plasmid DNA (Figure 2). Our technology exploits the ability to transfer protein encoding regions

(open reading frames; ORFs) into specialized tagged expression vectors. These new expression clones are then spotted on the array and the proteins are then produced in situ in a cell-free system and immobilized in place upon their synthesis. This minimizes direct manipulation of the proteins and produces them just-in-time for the experiment, avoiding problems with protein purification and stability (Science. 2004 305:86). A next generation method for these arrays has been developed that allows thousands of proteins to be produced simultaneously in situ, and with remarkably consistent protein levels displayed (Nat Methods. 2008 5:535).

The power of this approach is that by expressing many proteins on a single array, it is possible to test the function of many proteins simultaneously. In our laboratory we use NAPPA technology to explore several biological questions including: 1. Identifying autoantibody biomarkers in sera that can be readily used for the detection of cancer, such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, and lung cancer. 2. Identifying novel autoantibodies for Type I diabetes by serological screening of diabetic sera against a 6000+ library of human antigens. 3. Developing a better vaccine against B. anthracis. 4. Screening human serum in order to find antibodies against specific pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and V. chlorea to identify immunogenic proteins as a first step towards developing an effective vaccine (Figure 3).

Using protein microarrays to examine small molecule inhibitory specificity

There is a strong interest in our group in developing next generation applications for protein microarrays. One such project uses NAPPA to look at kinase activity. The human kinome contains more than 500 proteins well known for their importance in normal cell physiology and for their role in many diseases. Many kinases printed on NAPPA retain their kinase activity and can be used to test the IC50 of drugs used to inhibit them. This method may provide a high throughput rapid approach for evaluating drug selectivity as well as structure activity relationships.

A second project involves coupling two technologies, NAPPA and surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi), to create a high-throughput platform to detect and characterize a variety of protein interactions using a label-free detection system that is sensitive, quantitative and provides information on binding kinetics. We have developed new chemistries for NAPPA compatible with a SPRi device that has been adapted to be compatible with protein microarrays and detecting multiplex binding events. This method allows for real time and label-free detection of binding events for multiple proteins simultaneously, making this the first approach that will allow the simple determination of strength and selectivity of binding at scale. This technology has potential to revolutionize the study of protein interaction networks by enabling quantitative comparisons of binding affinities across many molecular species, as well as determining the kinetic data of interactions pathways.

Cell based research

We also have a strong interest in the high throughput study of protein function in vivo using cell based assays. Our large collection of full length gene clones can be employed in the ectopic expression of proteins in cells. We also have a complete collection of shRNAs that target human genes, allowing us to knock down expression of virtually any gene of interest. Both ectopic expression and RNAi are introduced into cells using retro and lenti-viral vectors, allowing us to target virtually any cell type of interest. By coupling these tools with state of the art robotics, high throughput screening studies are executed to look for proteins that alter cellular phenotypes.

One example of this approach focused on identifying and characterizing genes that regulate critical events involved in the progression of breast cancer and in understanding the development of resistance to anti-estrogen drug treatment. We have produced several matching drug sensitive and resistant breast cancer cultured cell lines that we used to find proteins that can make a drug sensitive cell become resistant. We used our clone collection of more than 500 human kinases in high throughput unbiased screens to identify 29 kinases that confer drug resistance on sensitive MCF7 subclones in repeated screens. This research has the potential to find genes that are involved in breast development and resistance to hormonal treatment in breast cancer. We hope that defining the gene pathways that are responsible for drug resistance will lead to combined treatments that will more effectively treat resistant cancers.

Publications

Pubications from 2009-2014 please see CV

  1. Halden, R. U.; Hartmann, E. M.; Denslow, N. D.; Haynes, P. A.; LaBaer, J. Recent advances in proteomics applied to elucidate the role of environmental impacts on human health and organismal function. J Proteome Res 2015 Jan, 14(1), 1-4. PMID: 25751307.
  2. Anderson, K. S.; Cramer, D. W.; Sibani, S.; Wallstrom, G.; Wong, J.; Park, J.; Qiu, J.; Vitonis, A.; LaBaer, J. Autoantibody Signature for the Serologic Detection of Ovarian Cancer. J Proteome Res 2015 Jan, 14(1), 578-86. PMID: 25365139.
  3. Nilsson, C. L.; Mostovenko, E.; Lichti, C. F.; Ruggles, K.; Fenyo, D.; Rosenbloom, K. R.; Hancock, W. S.; Paik, Y. K.; Omenn, G. S.; LaBaer, J.; Kroes, R. A.; Uhlen, M.; Hober, S.; Vegvari, A.; Andren, P. E.; Sulman, E. P.; Lang, F. F.; Fuentes, M.; Carlsohn, E.; Emmett, M. R.; Moskal, J. R.; Berven, F. S.; Fehniger, T. E.; Marko-Varga, G. Use of ENCODE Resources to Characterize Novel Proteoforms and Missing Proteins in the Human Proteome. J Proteome Res 2015 Feb, 14(2), 603-8. PMID: 25369122.
  4. Wiktor, P.; Brunner, A.; Kahn, P.; Qiu, J.; Magee, M.; Bian, X.; Karthikeyan, K.; LaBaer, J. Microreactor array device. Scientific Reports 2015 Mar, 5: 8736. PMID: 25736721.
  5. Park, J; Throop, A.L.; LaBaer, J. Site- Specific Recombinational Cloning Using Gateway and In-Fusion Cloning Schemes. Curr. Protoc. Mol. Biol. 2015 April, 110(3):1-3, 20,23. PMID: 25827088.
  6. Yu, X.; Decker, K. B.; Barker, K.; Neunuebel, M. R.; Saul, J.; Graves, M.; Westcott, N.;   Hang, H.; LaBaer, J.; Qiu, J.; Machner, M. P. Host-Pathogen Interaction Profiling Using Self-Assembling Human Protein Arrays. J Proteome Res 2015 April 3; 14(4): 1920-36. PMID: 25739981. 
  7. Diez, P.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, M.; Lourido, L.; Degano, R.M.; Ibarrola, N.; Casado-Vela, J.; LaBaer, J.; Fuentes, M. NAPPA as a Real New Method for Protein Microarray Generation. Microarrays 2015 Apr 24; 4(2):214-27. PMID: 27600221.
  8. Christensen, M. D.; Elmer, J. J.; Eaton, S.; Gonzalez-Malerva, L.; LaBaer, J.; Rege, K. Kinome-level screening identifies inhibition of polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1) as a target for enhancing non-viral transgene expression. J Control Release 2015 April, 204: 20-9. PMID: 25681050.
  9. Yu, X.; LaBaer, J. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays. Nature protocols 2015 May, 10(5): 756-67. PMID: 25881200.
  10. Bian, X.; Wiktor, P.; Kahn, P.; Brunner, A.; Khela, A.; Karthikeyan, K.; Barker, K.; Yu, X.; Magee, M.; Wasserfall, C. H.; Gibson, D.; Rooney, M. E.; Qiu, J.; LaBaer, J. Anti-viral antibody profiling by high density protein arrays. Proteomics 2015 June, 15(12): 2136-45. PMID: 25758251.
  11. Gong, Z.; Martin-Garcia, J. M.; Daskalova, S. M.; Craciunescu, F. M.; Song, L.; Dorner,  K.; Hansen, D. T.; Yang, J. H.; LaBaer, J.; Hogue, B. G.; Mor, T. S.; Fromme, P. Biophysical Characterization of a Vaccine Candidate against HIV-1: The Transmembrane and Membrane Proximal Domains of HIV-1 gp41 as a Maltose Binding Protein Fusion. PloS one 2015 Aug, 10(8), e0136507. PMID: 26295457.
  12. Horvatovich, P.; Vegvari, A.; Saul, J.; Park, J. G.; Qiu, J.; Syring, M.; Pirrotte, P.; Petritis, K.; Tegeler, T. J.; Aziz, M.; Fuentes, M.; Diez, P.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, M.; Ibarrola, N.; Droste, C.; De Las Rivas, J.; Gil, C.; Clemente, F.; Hernaez, M. L.; Corrales, F. J.; Nilsson, C. L.; Berven, F. S.; Bischoff, R.; Fehniger, T. E.; LaBaer, J.; Marko-Varga, G. In Vitro Transcription/Translation System: A Versatile Tool in the Search for Missing Proteins. Journal of Proteome Research 2015 Sept, 14(9):3441-51. PMID: 26155874.
  13. Diez, P.; Droste, C.; Degano, R. M.; Gonzalez-Munoz, M.; Ibarrola, N.; Perez-Andres, M.; Garin-Muga, A.; Segura, V.; Marko-Varga, G.; LaBaer, J.; Orfao, A.; Corrales, F. J.; De Las Rivas, J.; Fuentes, M. Integration of Proteomics and Transcriptomics Data Sets for the Analysis of a Lymphoma B-Cell Line in the Context of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project. Journal of Proteome Research 2015 Sept, 14(9): 3530-40. PMID: 26216070.
  14. Olia, A. S.; Barker, K.; McCullough, C. E.; Tang, H. Y.; Speicher, D. W.; Qiu, J.; LaBaer, J.; Marmorstein, R. Nonenzymatic Protein Acetylation detected by NAPPA Protein Arrays. ACS Chemical Biology 2015 Sept, 10(9): 2034-47. PMID: 26083674.
  15. Wang, J.; Figueroa J. D.; Wallstrom G.; Barker K.; Park J. G.; Demirkan G.; Lissowska J.; Anderson K. S.; Qiu J.; LaBaer J. Plasma autoantibodies associated with basal like breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarker & Prevention 2015 Sept, 24(9): 1332-40. PMID: 26070530.
  16. Seiler, C. Y.; Eschbacher, J.; Bowser, R.; LaBaer, J. Sustainability in a Hospital-Based Biobank and University-Based DNA Biorepository: Strategic Roadmaps. Biopreservation and Biobanking 2015 Dec, 13 (6), 401-9. PMID: 26697909.
  17. Bian, X.; Wallstrom, G.; Davis, A.; Wang, J.; Park, J.; Throop, A.; Steel, J.; Yu, X.; Wasserfall, C.; Schatz, D.; Atkinson, M.; Qiu, J.; LaBaer, J. Immunoproteomic Profiling of Anti-Viral Antibodies in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Using Protein Arrays. Diabetes 2016 Jan, 65(1): 285-96. PMID: 26450993.
  18. Weimann, S.; Pennacchio, C.; Hu, Y.; Hunter, P.; Harbers, M.; Amiet, A.; Bethel, G.; Busse, M.; Carninci, P.; Dunham, I.; Hao, T.; Harper, J.W.; Hayashizaki, Y.; Heil, O.; Hennig, S.; Hotz-Wagenblatt, A.; Jang, W.; Jocker, A.; Kawai, J.; Koenig, C.; Korn, B.; Lambert, C.; LeBeau, A.; Lu, S.; Maurer, J.; Moore, T.; Ohara, O.; Park, J.; Rolfs, A.; Salehi-Ashtiani, K.; Seiler, C.; Simmons, B.; van Brabant Smith, A.; Steel, J.; Wagner, L.; Weaver, T.; Wellenreuther, R.; Yang, S.; Vidal, M.; Gerhard, D.S.; LaBaer, J.; Temple, G.; Hill, D.E. The ORFeome Collaboration: a genome-scale human ORF-cline resource. Nature Methods 2016 March; 13(3): 191-2 PMID: 26914201.
  19. Wang, J.; Shivakumar, S.; Barker, K.; Tang, Y.; Wallstrom, G.; Park, J. G.; Tsay, J. C.; Pass, H. I.; Rom, W. N.; LaBaer, J.; Qiu, J. Comparative Study of Auntoantibody Responses between Lung Adenocarcinoma and Benign Pulmonary. J Thorac Oncology 2016 March, 11(3): 334-45. PMID: 26890632.
  20. Yu, X.; Petritis, B.; LaBaer, J. Advancing translational research with next generation protein microarrays. Proteomics 2016 April, 16(8), 1238-50 PMID: 26749402.
  21. Katchman, B. A.; Barderas, R.; Alam, R.; Chowell, D.; Field, M. S.; Esserman, L. J.; Wallstrom, G.; LaBaer, J.; Cramer, D.; Hollingsworth, M. A.; Anderson, K. S. Proteomic Mapping of p53 Immunogenicity in Pancreatic, Ovarian, and Breast Cancers. Proteomics Clinical Applications 2016 July, 10(7): 720-31 PMID: 27121307.
  22. Karthikeyan, K.; Barker, K.; Tang, Y.; Kahn, P.; Wiktor, P.; Brunner, A.; Knabben, V.; Takulapalli, B.; Buckner, J.; Nepom, G.; LaBaer, J.; Qiu, J. A contra capture protein array platform for studying post-translationally modified auto-antigenomes. Molecular & Cellular Proteomics 2016 July, 15(7): 2324-37. PMID: 27141097.
  23. Yazaki, J; Galli, M; Kim, A. Y.; Nito, K; Aleman, F; Chang, K. N.; Carvunis, A. R.; Quan, R; Nguyen, H; Song, L; Alvarez, JM; Huang, SS; Chen, H; Ramachandran, N; Altmann, S; Gutiérrez, R. A.; Hill, D. E.; Schroeder, J. I.; Chory, J; LaBaer, J; Vidal, M; Braun, P; Ecker, J. R. Mapping transcription factor interactome networks using HaloTag protein arrays. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2016 July, 113(29): 2324-37. PMID: 27357687.
  24. Wang, D; Yang, L; Zhang, P; LaBaer, J; Hermjakob, H; Li, D; Yu, X. AAgAtlas 1.0: a human autoantigen database. Nucleic Acids Res 2017 Jan 4; 45(D1):D769-D776. PMID: 27924021.
  25. Bian, X; Wasserfall, C; Wallstrom, G; Wang, J; Wang, H; Barker, K; Schatz, D; Atkinson, M; Qiu, J; LaBaer, J. Tracking the Antibody Immunome in Type 1 Diabetes Using Protein Arrays. J Proteome Res 2017 Jan 6; 16(1):195-203 PMID: 27690455.
  26. Marko-Varga, G; LaBaer, J. The Immune System and the Proteome. J Proteome Res 2017 Jan 6; 16(1):1. PMID: 28056507.
Research Activity

(PI) 1991; ASU FDN (Flinn Foundation): Flinn-JL) Establishment of a high throughput protein production center to empower translational research in Arizona (ASUF 30005389) 2014-2018

(Co-I) ASU FDN (Kleberg Foundation): Does Mycobacterium tuberculosis use cellular modiFICations to survive in human macrophages 2014-2018

(Co-I) R21 CA187892; HHS-NIH-NCI: Power analysis tools for biomarker discovery with heterogeneous diseases 2012-2016

(PI) R21CA196442; HHS-NIH-NCI: Multiplexed In Solution Protein Array (MISPA) for identifying novel protein interactions in cancer and for early detection of immune responses in path 2015-2020

(PI) R01 CA199948; HHS-NIH-NCI: Exploiting the immune response to detect pathogen-induced cancers 2015-2020

(PI) U01 GM098912; HHS-NIH-NIGMS: Continuation and Enhancement of the PSI: Biology-Materials Repository 2011-2017

(PI) HHS0100201000008C; BARDA: Integrated Biodosimetry System (IBiS) for High Throughput Medical Care After Radiologic and Nuclear Events 2009-2017

(PI) BCRF: Breast Cancer 1000 Project: Covering genes that collaborate with mutant TP53 to drive breast cancer aggressiveness 2012-2016

(Co-I) 1531991; NSF-BIO-DBI: MRI: Acquisition of Cryo-EM for Southwest Regional Center 2015-2020

(Co-I) FP00001458; GBSI:  Design and Creation of a Registry for Housing Standard Procurement Operating Procedures for Tissue Collection 2014-2017

(PI)1032238-ASU; BARROW INST/ST JOS HOSP (NIH):Targeting Olig2 Co-Regulators for Malignant Glioma Therapy 2015-2020

(PI) ARI-208289; ASU- MAYO Seed Grant:  qPCR-based Bio-burden Testing of Duodenoscopes 2016-2017

(Co-I) Translational Genomics Research Instittue (TGen): TMA Microbiome 2016-2016

(Co-I) FP00006039; Leidos (HHS-NIH): Center for Membrane Protein Drug Discovery (MEDD)2016-2021

(PI) R24GM120465; HHS-NIH-NIGMS: DNASU, the Plasmid Materials Repository, 2020 and Beyond 2016-2019

(Co-I) UNR-17-09; UNIV OF NEVADA – RENO: Discovery of Secreted Circulating and In Vivo Amplified Bacterial Antigens 2016-2018

(PI) U01 CA214201; NCI: - Novel approaches to study immune responses to post translational modifications for cancer detection 2016-2021

(PI) FP00005524; CIATEJ: Search and validation of biomarkers for tuberculosis in Mexican patients with diabetes mellitus 2016-2019

(Co-I) FP00006831; Arizona Alzheimer’s Disease Core Center: Using protein arrays to find molecular antibody biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease 2016-2017

Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
MBB 493Honors Thesis
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
BDE 792Research
BDE 799Dissertation
Summer 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
BDE 792Research
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
BCH 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
BCH 598Special Topics
BDE 792Research
BDE 799Dissertation
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
MBB 493Honors Thesis
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
BDE 792Research
BDE 799Dissertation
Summer 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
BDE 792Research
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
BCH 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
BCH 598Special Topics
BDE 792Research
BDE 799Dissertation
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
MBB 493Honors Thesis
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
BDE 792Research
BDE 799Dissertation
Summer 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
BDE 792Research
Spring 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
BCH 494Special Topics
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
BCH 598Special Topics
BDE 792Research
BDE 799Dissertation
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
MBB 493Honors Thesis
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
BDE 792Research
BDE 799Dissertation
Summer 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
BDE 792Research
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
MBB 492Honors Directed Study
BCH 494Special Topics
MIC 495Undergraduate Research
MBB 495Undergraduate Research
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
BIO 499Individualized Instruction
BCH 598Special Topics
BDE 792Research
BDE 799Dissertation
Fall 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
MBB 495Undergraduate Research
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
BDE 792Research
BDE 799Dissertation
Spring 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
MIC 495Undergraduate Research
MBB 495Undergraduate Research
BIO 495Undergraduate Research
BCH 598Special Topics
Presentations
  • LaBaer, J. Protein Microarrays for Studies in Biomarkers and Post Translational Modificaion. PepTalk 2015–the Protein Science Week (Jan 2015).
  • LaBaer, J. Associate Editor. Journal of Proteome Research Editors Meeting, Madrid, Spain (Oct 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Advances in Expression and Interaction Proteomics. 13th Human Proteome Organization World Congress, Madrid, Spain (Oct 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Breast Cancer Research Foundation. BCRF Symposium and Award Luncheon (Oct 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Knight Cancer Challenge. Knight Cancer Institute Early Detection Think Tank (Oct 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Research Updates on EDRN. 9th EDRN Early Detection Research Network Scientific Workshop, Bethesda, MD (Sep 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Autoantibody Biomarkers in Basal-Like Breast Cancer. 9th EDRN Early Detection Research Network Scientific Workshop, Bethesda, MD (Sep 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Improving International Research with Clinical Specimens: 5 Achievable Objectives. Translational Medicine Forum, MipTec 2014 Conference, Basel, Switzerland (Sep 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Invited medical consultant. Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Medicine, Portland, OR (Aug 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Board of Scientific Advisors. National Cancer Advisory Board and the National Institutes of Health (NCAB), Bethesda, MD (Jun 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. 1st International Symposium of Translational Theranostics, Tsinghua University (May 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. The US-led Chromosome-Centric HPP teams. US HUPO, Frontiers and Proteomics, Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA (Apr 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Developing Alternative Protein Affinity Reagents for Molecular Medicine. US HUPO, Frontiers and Proteomics, Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA (Apr 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. High-Throughput Cell based Studies and Protein Microarrays: for Biomarker and Target Discovery. 2014 Baylor Cancer Center/Breast Cancer Program Lecture, Houston, TX (Apr 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. High-Throughput Cell based Studies and Protein Microarrays: for Biomarker and Target Discovery. Arizona Osteopathic Medical Association Meeting (Apr 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies And Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. Emerging Technologies for Clinical & Laboratory Diagnostics: The 46th Annual Oak Ridge Conference (Apr 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Challenging Dogma: Creating a New Generation of Efficacious Biomarker-Driven Clinical Trials. National Biomarker Development Alliance (NBDA) Workshop IV, Scottsdale, AZ (Mar 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. National Cancer Institute/Division of Cancer Prevention Early Detection Research Network (EDRN). 26th EDRN Steering Committee Meeting, Houston, TX (Mar 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Board Meeting. National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health, Board of Scientific Advisors (BSA) (Mar 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Presentation "Breast Cancer" and Co-Chair Session "Biomarker Discovery Pipeline". US-Japan Joint Meeting on Biomarkers for Early Cancer Detection, Gaithersburg, MD (Feb 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Protein Work. Ventana (Roche) and the Biodesign Institute, Tucson, AZ (Jan 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Overview of Biomarker Discovery – the Key Barriers. National Biomarker Development Alliance (NBDA) Forum, Washington, D.C (Jan 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. Global Biological Standards Institute. GBSI Scientific Advisory Council Inaugural Meeting (Jan 2014).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. 12th Human Proteome Organization Congress, Yokohama, Japan, September 15, 2013 (Sep 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. 12th Human Proteome Organization Congress, Yokohama, Japan (Sep 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. High-Throughput Cell based Studies and Protein Microarrays: for Biomarker and Target Discovery. Cancer Center Grand Rounds, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (Jul 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX, June 4, 2013 (Jun 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. Improving patient care with personalized diagnostics. Dorothy Foundation (May 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. Department of Biochemistry, Harland G. Wood Memorial Lecture, Case Western Reserve University, Scho (May 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. High-Throughput Cell based Studies and Protein Microarrays: for Biomarker and Target Discovery. Cancer Center Grand Rounds (CCGR), Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, May 30, 2013 (May 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. Translational Proteomics: Biology, Technology and Clinical Advances. US HUPO 9th Annual Conference (Apr 2013).
  • Xiaobo Yu; Andrew R Woolery; Phi Luong; Yi Heng Hao; Markus Grammel; Nathan Westcott; Jin Park; Jie Wang; Xiaofang Bian; Gokhan Demirkan; Howard C. Hang3; Kim Orth2; Joshua LaBaer1; 1Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ; 2University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX; 3The Rockefeller University, New York, NY. Global Analysis of Bacteria-host Interaction by AMPylation Using Human Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays. 9th Annual US HUPO Meeting (Mar 2013).
  • Xiaofang Bian; Shane Miersch;Garrick Wallstrom; Sahar Sibani; Tanya Logvinenko; Clive H. Wasserfall; Desmond Schatz; Mark A. Atkinson; Ji Qiu; Joshua LaBaer. Serological Autoantibody Profiling of Type 1 Diabetes by Protein Arrays. 9th Annual US HUPO Meeting (Mar 2013).
  • Brianne Petritis; Mitch Magee; Benjamin Ober-Reynolds; Justin Saul; Jin Park; Ian Shoemaker; Jason Steel; Kevin Peasely; Joshua LaBaer. Quantitative analyses of protein-protein interactions in the B-cell receptor signaling pathway. 9th Annual US HUPO Meeting (Mar 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. "Autoantibodies in Basal-like Breast Cancer?". 8th Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) Scientific Workshop (Mar 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. High throughput Biomarker Discovery using cell-based and protein-arrays. 7th Annual Arizona Myeloma Network (Mar 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. High-throughput Biomarker and Target Discovery using Cell-based Assays and Protein Arrays. T. echnology Assessment Committee Meeting; College of American Pathologists (CAP) (Mar 2013).
  • LaBaer, J. High-Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. PepTalk–the Protein Science Week, Cambridge Healthtech Institute (Jan 2013).
  • Catherine Cormier, Jason Steel, Michael Fiacco, Jin Park, Preston Hunter, Amit Sharma, Casey Sedillo, and Joshua LaBaer. The PSI:Biology-Materials Repository: A Resource for Protein Expression Plasmids. PSI:Biology Technologies Workshop, Bethesda, MD, December 12, 2012 (Dec 2012).
  • Catherine Cormier, Jason Steel, Michael Fiacco, Jin Park, Preston Hunter, Amit Sharma, Casey Sedillo, and Joshua LaBaer. The PSI:Biology-Materials Repository: A Resource for Protein Expression Plasmids. , American Society for Cell Biology Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 18, 2012 (Dec 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. Principle Investigator’s Retreat for the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Innovative Molecular Anal (Nov 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. Spanish National Institute of Proteomics (ProteoRed consortium), Madrid, Spain Bitechnology Center, (Oct 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. "High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery". Cancer Research Center, Salamanca, Spain October 16, 2012 (Oct 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. "High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery". III ProteoRed-ISCIII Protein Microarrays Course, Scientific Park-Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Oct 2012).
  • Gonzalez-Malerva; Eaton S; Chow D; Yin H; Park J; Iwanicki M; Anderson KS Brugge J; and LaBaer J. Functional Differences of mutant p53s expressed in MCF10A cells and their contribution to breast carcinogenesis. Hallmarks of Cancer Meeting. San Francisco, CA. 2012 (Oct 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. Invited Honoree, Mini-Retreat, The Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. The Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, Oct 24, (Oct 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. Invited Honoree, Symposium: "Behind the Headlines: Hype vs. Hope in Breast Cancer Research and Management in the News". The Breast Cancer Research Foundation, The Waldorf Astoria, Jade and Astor Salons, (Oct 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. Forum for the Asian-Pacific Biosignature Center (APBC), Tianjin International Institute for Joint Bi (Sep 2012).
  • Xiaofang Bian, Shane Miersch, Garrick Wallstrom, Sahar Sibani, Tanya Logvinenko, 5Clive H. Wasserfall, 5Desmond Schatz, 5Mark A. Atkinson, Ji Qiu, Joshua LaBaer. Autoantibody Biomarkers Discovery of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) using Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array (NAPPA). 2012 World HUPO (Boston) (Sep 2012).
  • Xiaobo Yu, Andrew Woolery, Markus Grammel, Nathan Westcott, Jie Wang, Kim Orth, Howard Hang and Joshua LaBaer. Global Identification of Proteins with AMPylation using Human Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays. HUPO2012, Boston (Sep 2012).
  • Catherine Cormier, Jin Park, Jason Steel, Michael Fiacco, Preston Hunter, Jason Kramer, Joshua LaBaer. PSI:Biology-Materials Repository: A Biologist’s Resource for Protein Expression Plasmids. Protein Society Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, August 7, 2012 (Aug 2012).
  • Catherine Cormier, Jin Park, Jason Steel, Michael Fiacco, Preston Hunter, Jason Kramer, Joshua LaBaer. The PSI:Biology-Materials Repository: A Resource for Protein Expression Plasmids. American Crystallography Association Annual Meeting, PSI:More Tools for the Home Lab Session, Boston (Jul 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. Microbiology and Immunology Seminar Series, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, (Jun 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. Biomarker Research on Breast Cancer: New Technology. National Cancer Institute – Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CI (May 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. "Early Detection and Biomarkers". Xian, China (May 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. Applying protein microarrays for early disease detection. The Science Café, Biodesign Institute, Tempe AZ, April 9, 2012 (Apr 2012).
  • Catherine Y. Cormier, Jin Park, Michael Fiacco, Jason Steel, Jason Kramer, and Joshua LaBaer. PSI:Biology-Materials Repository: A Public Resource for Structural Biology and Cancer Pathway Plasmids. Experimental Biology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, April 24, 2012 (Apr 2012).
  • Gonzalez-Malerva L, Park J, Velmurugan K, Mumenthaler S, LaBaer J. Genomic and proteomic characterization of tamoxifen sensitive and resistant MCF7 cells. Association for Cancer Research. Chicago, Illinois (Apr 2012).
  • Catherine Y. Cormier, Jin Park, Michael Fiacco, Jason Steel, Preston Hunter, and Joshua LaBaer. PSI:Biology-Materials Repository: A Public Resource for Structural Biology and Cancer Pathway Plasmids. American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, April 3, 2012 (Mar 2012).
  • Wallstrom, G., Anderson, KS., LaBaer, J. Implications of Disease Heterogeneity on Biomarker Screening. US HUPO from Genes to Function, The Future of Proteomics (Mar 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. Novel Applications. From Genes to Function, US HUPO 8th Annual Conference (Mar 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. US HUPO 8th Annual Conference, "From Genes to Function," San Francisco, (Mar 2012).
  • LaBaer, J.; E. Harlow. "Biomarkers: Discussion of plans for evaluating NCI’s current activities". NCI Scientific Program Leaders and Office of Director Staff Retreat, Bethesda MD (Jan 2012).
  • Catherine Y. Cormier, Jin G. Park, Michael Fiacco, Jason Steel, Preston Hunter, Jason Kramer, Rajeev Singla, Anindita Day, and Joshua LaBaer. PSI:Biology-Materials Repository: A Biologist’s Resource for Protein Expression Plasmids. High-Throughput Structural Biology Keystone Symposia, Keystone, CO, Jan 22-27, 2012 (Jan 2012).
  • LaBaer, J.; Harlow, E. "Biomarkers: Discussion of plans for evaluating NCI’s current activities". NCI Scientific Program Leaders and Office of Director Staff Retreat. Bethesda, MD, January 24, 2012 (Jan 2012).
  • LaBaer, J. PSI Materials Repository Report. Annual Meeting of the PSI: Biology Network; Bethesda, MD (Dec 2011).
  • Chaput, J. and LaBaer, J. A Pipeline for Production of Bivalent Synthetic Antibodies to the Human Proteome". Protein Capture Reagents Consortia Meeting, Bethesda, MD, Dec 15-16, 20 (Dec 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. Implementing the Protein Capture Network - Dissemination and Outreach. National Institutes of Health - Protein Capture Reagents Consortium Kick-Off Meeting (Dec 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. Role of EDRN in Cancer Prevention. EDRN Network Consulting Team (NCT) Meeting, Bethesda MD (Nov 2011).
  • LaBaer J. Updates on research. USC PSOC Symposium, Los Angeles, CA, Oct 17-18, 2011 (Oct 2011).
  • LaBAer J. Making hard decisions. Detecting and managing prostate cancer in the molecular age. ASU Foundation- President’s Community Enrichment Programs (PCEP), Payson, AZ October 13, 2011 (Oct 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. Debate: Judging the Returns on Investment in Biomarker Research – Too Much or Too Little. 7th EDRN Scientific Workshop; Bethesda MD (Sep 2011).
  • LaBaer. "Autoantibodies". NCI – Early Detection Research Network DMCC Site visit, Seattle WA August 31, 2011 (Sep 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. Will describe the work of the collaborative groups, emphasizing the translational effort. EDRN Advocacy Educational Webinar (Sep 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. "Case Study II (Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer). National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), Food and Drug Ad (Aug 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. Experimental Design Considerations in Research Studies Using Proteomic Technologies. National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), Food and Drug Ad (Aug 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. Immune response in disease. Colon Cancer Biomarker Validation Project (Jun 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. "Antigen Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer". Head Start-"UP" 2011, Palo Alto, CA (May 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. Molecular Diagnostics: Translation from the Bench to the Clinic*. Current Protocols Webinars (Apr 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. Board of Scientific Advisors (BSA). National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health, Board of Scientific Advisors (BSA) (Mar 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. 22nd EDRN Steering Committee Meeting, National Cancer Institute/Division of Cancer Prevention Early Detection Research Network (EDRN. 22nd EDRN Steering Committee Meeting, National Cancer Institute/Division of Cancer Prevention Early (Mar 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery,". ASU PSOC SEMINAR, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (Feb 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. "Early detection research and personalized medicine". 24th International Conference on Screening for Lung Cancer, The International Early Lung Cancer Acti (Feb 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. Basic Sciences Provocative Questions Workshop". Workshop -National Cancer Institute, Lawton Chiles International House (Stone House), Bethesda, MD (Feb 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. "Grand Challenges in Proteomics Workshop,". Biotechnology Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council’s (NSTC) Committee on Scie (Feb 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. "Think Tank/Mini workshop on Companion Imaging and Molecular Diagnostics". National Cancer Institute/Division of Cancer Prevention Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) (Feb 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. "Protein Microarrays for Protein Biomarker and Interaction Studies.". International Symposium on Mapping the Human Proteome: Getting to the Heart of Proteomics, NHLBI Pro (Jan 2011).
  • LaBaer, J. High Throughput Cell-Based Studies and Protein Microarrays for Biomarker and Target Discovery. The Breast Cancer Symposium "Think Tank 20" (Jan 2011).
Service
  • Mayo Clinic, Adjunt Professor of Medicine in College of Medicine (2014 - Present)
  • National Cancer Institute (NCI), Division of Cancer Prevention, Early Detection Research Network (EDRN): Chair of the EDRN Executive Committee and Co-Chair of the Steering Committee (2010- Present)
  • American Type Culture Collection (ATCC), Board Member (2014 - Present)
  • The Dorothy Foundation, Scientific Advisory Board (2011- Present)
  • Provista Diagnostics Scientific Advisory Board (2011- Present
  • Promega Corporation, Member of the Scientific Advisory Board (2007 - Present)
  • President-Elect United States Human Proteome Organization (2012-2014)
  • President United States Human Proteome Organization (2014-2016)
  • Global Biological Standards Institute (GBSI) Scientific Advisory Council (2013- Present)
  • INanoBio Scientific Advisory Board (2016- Present)
  • Executive Director, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (2017- Present)
  • Biodesign Faculty Search Committee, Chair (2014 - Present)
  • Biodesign Executive Committee, Member (2013 - Present)
  • Biodesign Faculty Search Committee, Chair (2013 - Present)
  • Biodesign Internal Advisory Committee, Member (2013 - Present)
  • Biodesign/ School of Life Sciences Faculty Search Committee, Member of the Search Committee (2013 - Present)
  • Biological and Health Systems Engineering; Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, Member of the Search Committee (2013 - Present)
  • Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Faculty Search Committee, Member of the Search Committee (2013 - Present)
  • School of Molecular Sciences Search Committee, Member of the Search Committee (2013 - Present)
  • Virginia G. Piper Center for Personalized Diagnostics, Director (2013 - Present)
  • Bioanalytical Faculty Search: Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Faculty Search Committee, Member of the Search Committee (2012 - Present)
  • Biodesign Institute -Research Faculty Personnel Committee, Faculty Advisor (2012 - Present)
  • Department of Physics, CLAS/Biodesign Institute Faculty Search, Member of the Search Committee (2012 - Present)
  • Dept of Biomedical Informatics Faculty Search, Committe member (2012 - Present)
  • Mayo/ASU GI Specialty Council, Member (2012 - Present)
  • Molecular, Cellular, Tissue Engineering - Faculty Search Committee, Member of the Search Committee (2012 - Present)
  • National Biomarker Development Alliance, Member (2012 - Present)
  • ASU/PCH Research/Education Initiatives, Member (2011 - Present)
  • Biodesign Institute Faculty Search Committee, Chairman (2011 - Present)
  • President's University Council, Member (2011 - Present)
  • Professional Societies: American Association of Cancer Research (AACR), Member (2010 - Present)
  • National Institutes of Health, Board of Scientific Advisors (BSA), Bethesda, MD, November 7-8, 2013., Board Member (2009 - Present)
  • Journal: Clinical Proteomics (CLIP), Member of the Editorial Board (2009 - Present)
  • School of Molecular Sciences, Professor (2009 - Present)
  • Virginia G. Piper Center for Personalized Diagnostics, Director (2009 - Present)
  • Journal: Cancer Biomarker, Member of the Editorial Board (2008 - Present)
  • Journal: Current Opinion in Biotechnology, Member of the Editorial Board (2008 - Present)
  • Journal: Molecular Biosystems, Associate Editor (2008 - Present)
  • Journal: Analytical Biochemistry, Associate Editor (2007 - Present)
  • Journal of Proteome Research, Associate Editor (2002 - Present)
  • International Human Proteome Organization, Member (2001 - Present)