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Michelene Chi

Dorothy Bray Professor of Science and Teaching
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 1811
Professor
Faculty, TEMPE Campus, Mailcode 1811
Biography

Michelene T.H. Chi is a cognitive and learning science researcher interested in active learning, defined as ways in which students engage with the learning materials. She has developed a framework for active learning called ICAP that differentiates students' overt engagement activities into four kinds: collaborative/Interactive, generative/Constructive, manipulative/Active, and attentive/Passive, and predicts that I>C>A>P. Professor Chi is also interested in instructional videos for online learning and proposes that videos of tutorial dialogues are more effective for student learning than didactic monologue videos. Her research centers on students' learning of concepts in STEM domains focusing on "emergent" concepts for which students hold robust misconceptions.

Professor Chi is the director of the Learning and Cognition Lab at ASU. One of her research projects involves devising and implementing a professional development module for teachers to create lesson activities that promote greater and deeper learning and facilitate certain modes of engagement behaviors in students. The framework that her team provides is based on previous empirical work that demonstrates the success of designing activities that foster types of engagement that they identify. The goal is to implement these modules remotely so that teachers design activities within their lesson plans tailored to specific disciplines such as courses in science.

Professor Chi is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Education. 

Education

Ph.D. Carnegie-Mellon University.

Research Interests

Guiding Research Questions:

  • How can we promote the highest level of engagement in classrooms to achieve the best learning outcomes? 
  • Can particular processes in science class be presented from an emergent perspective to facilitate a better understanding?
  • Can online videos achieve greater learning if they contain tutorial dialogues instead of lecture-style monologues? 

Current Research Projects:

One of Chi's research projects involves the devising and implementing of a professional development module for teachers to create lesson activities that facilitate certain modes of engagement behaviors in students that promote greater and deeper learning. The framework that her team provides is based on previous empirical work that demonstrates the success of designing activities that foster the types of engagement we identify. The end goal is that teachers can use the modules remotely to design activities within their lesson plans and tailor them to specific disciplines, such as courses in science. 

A second project is centered on addressing the misconceptions that arise out of teaching certain processes in science by following a sequential order as opposed to an emergent one. The theoretical framework contends that presenting particular processes under the lens of emergence helps students effectively understand causal explanations of emergent phenomena found in the natural world as well as in their science classes. The final goal is to create a stand-alone module that teaches the properties and causal explanations of emergence underlying science processes taught in the classrooms.  

A third project in Chi's lab examines the benefit of incorporating tutorial dialogues in online videos, compared to didactic lecture-type monologues. Chi and colleagues prior studies found an advantage in students’ learning when they watched dialogue-videos over monologue-videos, and they are attempting to replicate this result in a biology class at ASU. 

Publications

Chi, M. T. H., Kang, S., & Yaghmourian, D. L. (2016). Why students learn more from dialogue- than monologue-videos: Analyses of peer interactions. Journal of the Learning Sciences. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/10508406.2016.120456 

Chi, M. T. H., & Wylie, R. (2014). The ICAP framework: Linking cognitive engagement to active learning outcomes. Educational Psychologist, 49, 219-243 (lead article).  

Chi, M. T. H. (2013). Two kinds and four sub-types of misconceived knowledge, ways to change it and the learning outcomes. International Handbook of Research on Conceptual Change (2nd edition). (pp. 49-70). New York, NY: Routledge Press.    

Research Activity
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
DCI 790Reading and Conference
DCI 792Research
DCI 799Dissertation
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
DCI 790Reading and Conference
DCI 791Seminar
DCI 792Research
DCI 799Dissertation
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
DCI 790Reading and Conference
DCI 791Seminar
DCI 792Research
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
DCI 792Research
DCI 799Dissertation
Spring 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
DCI 790Reading and Conference
DCI 792Research
Fall 2015
Course NumberCourse Title
DCI 799Dissertation
Fall 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
TEL 494Special Topics
DCI 799Dissertation
Spring 2014
Course NumberCourse Title
TEL 494Special Topics
Fall 2013
Course NumberCourse Title
DCI 799Dissertation
Presentations
  • Michelene T.H. Chi. Intelligent Tutoring Systems and Games for STEM instruction. A workshop sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (Nov 2010).
  • Michelene T.H. Chi. Solving Problems in School: Concepts, Procedures, and Instruction to Support Learning,. American Psychological Society Annual Convention in Boston (May 2010).
  • Michelene T.H. Chi. Dialogue Analyses for Learning. Communication Analyses Workshop (Feb 2010).
  • Michelene T.H. Chi, Stephen Krausse, & Muhsin Menekse. Using a Cognitive Framework of Differentiated Overt Learning Activities (DOLA) for Designing Effective Classroom Instruction in Materials Science and Nanotechnology. NSF-sponsored Awardee Conference (Jan 2010).
Honors / Awards
  • 2016 The American Academy of Arts & Sciences
  • 2016 Distinguished Contributions to Research in Education Award: Presented by the American Educational Research Association (AERA) for outstanding achievement and success in education research
  • 2015 Thorndike Career Achievement Award: Presented by the American Psychological Association (APA) for lifetime contribution in research
  • 2015 The Inaugural Dorothy Bray Endowed Professor of Science and Teaching for Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University
  • 2014 Wickenden Award: Presented by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), for "the highest standards of scholarly research in engineering education published in the Journal of Engineering Education in 2013"
  • 2013 Faculty Achievement Award for Best Professional Application: Arizona State University
  • 2013 Faculty Achievement Award for Defining Edge Research and Creative Work: Professional Application, Arizona State University
  • 2013 Sylvia Scribner Award: Presented by the American Educational Research Association (AERA), Learning and Instruction Division, for research that represents significant advancement in our understanding of learning and instruction
  • 2010 Elected to the National Academy of Education
  • 2006 Chancellor's Distinguished Research Award, Senior Category For "innovative research of landmark impact in several research areas", University of Pittsburgh
  • 2001 Cited in Carnegie-Mellon University's Centennial Magazine as one of its 87 most successful undergraduates
  • 1982 Boyd R. McCandless Young Scientist Award, presented by Division 7 of the American Psychological Association (APA), for distinguished theoretical contribution and programmatic research efforts in the field of developmental psychology
  • 1977-1982 Spencer Fellowship. Awarded by the National Academy of Education, for promising research and professional development contributing to the theory and practice of education
Professional Associations
  • 2013 Fellow, American Educational Research Association
  • 2002 - 2005 Resident Fellow, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh
  • 2002 Fellow, One of seven inaugural fellows, Cognitive Science Society
  • 1988 Fellow, Board of Ethnic Minority Affairs, American Psychological Association
  • 1996-1997 Resident Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA
  • 1992 Fellow, Association for Psychological Science
  • 1986 Fellow, Division 7, American Psychological Association
Service
  • American Educational Research Association, Chair, Research Advisory Committee (RAC) (2015 - 2018)
  • MIT Online Education Policy Initiative, Advisory Board Member (2014 - 2016)
  • Learning@Scale Inaugural Conference in Atlanta, Co-Chair (2013 - 2014)
  • Gates Foundation, A member of the Advisory Board (2010 - 2013)
  • The Spencer Foundation, A member of the review panel for Small Grants. (2010 - 2012)
  • Various journals, granting agencies, and individuals, Adhoc reviewers and recommenders (2010 - 2010)