Integrated Search Menu

Heather Bateman

Assoc Professor
Faculty, POLY Campus, Mailcode 2780
Assoc Professor
Faculty, POLY Campus, Mailcode 2780
Associate Professor
Faculty, POLY Campus, Mailcode 2780
Senior Sustainability Scientist
Faculty, POLY Campus, Mailcode 2780
Biography: 

Heather Bateman grew up in western Colorado and attended college in Idaho. Graduate school took her to the Northwest to pursue a Master's researching the effects of prescribed burns on cavity-nesting birds and also provided the opportunity to work for a non-profit conservation organization. Doctoral work in New Mexico provided a beautiful setting to study the effects of non-native plant removal on reptiles and amphibians along the Middle Rio Grande. This research was in collaboration with the USDA Forest Service and a postdoctoral position followed in Montana. 

Bateman is a field ecologist and conservation biologist interested in how human land-use affects vertebrate populations and habitats, especially in riparian ecosystems. Her research interests lie in exploring wildlife responses to habitat alteration, with a particular interest in amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Her current research focuses on exploring the impacts of non-native species management on herpetofauna communities along the San Pedro and Gila Rivers. She also conducts research to link instream flows to terrestrial wildlife in the Southwest riparian areas. 

Bateman holds memberships with the Wildlife Society, Society for Ecological Restoration, and Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

Education: 
  • Ph.D. Biology, University of New Mexico 2007
  • M.S. Biology, Eastern Washington University 2000
  • B.S. Ecology, Idaho State University 1998
Images
User-submitted personal image. No description yet available.

Dr. Bateman with desert spiny lizard
Field crew on the San Pedro project

Cheyenne, Sidney, and Lauren checking traps on the San Pedro Project
Grad student searching for gartersnake

Tiffany using radiotelemetry to locate gartersnakes
Field crew surveying for toads in AZ Wilderness

Field crew surveying for toads in AZ Wilderness
Videos
Research Interests: 

Wildlife ecology, riparian ecology, herpetology, ornithology, urban ecology, and restoration ecology

Faculty webpage click here.

Publications: 

(Most recent)

Bateman, H.L., J.A. Brown, K.L. Larson, R. Andrade, and B. Hughes. 2021. Unwanted residential wildlife: Evaluating social-ecological patterns for snake removals. Global Ecology and Conservation e01601.

Albuquerque, F.S., H.L. Bateman, C. Boheme, D.A. Allen, and L. Cayuela. 2021. Variation in temperature, precipitation, and vegetation productivity drive changes in seasonal variation of bird diversity in an urban desert landscape. Land 10(5):480 

Herzog, C.J., and H.L. Bateman. 2021. Using trail cameras to document meso and large mammal use of native and non-native riparian forest types in southeastern Arizona. Western North American Naturalist 81:71–86.

Andrade, R., J. Franklin, K.L. Larson, C.S. Swan, S.B. Lerman, H.L. Bateman, P.S. Warren, and A. York. 2020. Predicting the assembly of novel communities in urban ecosystems. Landscape Ecology 36:1-15. 

Brown, J.A., K.L. Larson, S.B. Lerman, D.L. Childers, R. Andrade, H.L. Bateman, S.J. Hall, P.S. Warren, and A. York. 2020. Influences of environmental and social factors on perceived bio-cultural services and disservices. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 8:366. 

Cubley, E.S., H.L. Bateman (co-leads), S.B. Riddle, C. Holmquist-Johnson, and D.M. Merritt. 2020. Predicting bird guilds using vegetation physiognomy and woody composition on a Wild and Scenic River in Arizona. Invited issue Physical and Biotic Drivers of Change in Riparian Ecosystems. Wetlands 40(6):1829-1842. 

Cubley, E.S., H.L. Bateman, D.M. Merritt, and D. Cooper. 2020. Using vegetation guilds to predict bird habitat along a desert river. Invited issue Physical and Biotic Drivers of Change in Riparian Ecosystems. Wetlands 40:1843–1862. 

Bateman, H.L. and D.M. Merritt. 2020. Complex riparian habitats predict reptile and amphibian diversity. Global Ecology and Conservation 22, 10.1016/j.gecco.2020.e00957

Riddle, S.B., and H.L. Bateman. 2020. Habitat and soil associations of a fossorial toad in a Sonoran Desert riparian forest. Journal of Arid Environments 181:104239.

Bateman, H.L., and S.B. Riddle. 2020. Reptile community responses to native and non-native riparian forests and disturbance along two rivers in Arizona. River Research and Applications 2020:1-11.

Allen, D.C., H.L. Bateman, P.S. Warren, F.S. Albuquerque, S. Arnett-Romero, and B. Harding. 2019. Long-term effects of land-use change on bird communities depend on spatial scale and land-use type. Ecosphere 10(11), e02952.

Warren, P.S., Lerman, S.B., Andrade, R., Larson, K.L., and H.L. Bateman. 2019. The more things change: species losses detected in Phoenix despite stability in bird–socioeconomic relationships. Ecosphere 10(3), e02624.

Jackson, L.N. and H.L. Bateman 2018. Differing ectoparasite loads, sexual modes, and abundances of whiptail lizards from native and non-native habitats. Herpetological Conservation and Biology 13(1):294-301.

Andrade, R., H.L. Bateman, J. Franklin, and D.C. Allen 2018. Waterbird community composition, abundance, and diversity along an urban gradient. Landscape and Urban Planning. 170:103-111.

Sprague, T.A. and H.L. Bateman 2018. Influence of seasonality and gestation on habitat selection by northern Mexican gartersnakes (Thamnophis eques megalops). PloS one. 13(1):e0191829.

Nagler, P.L., U. Nguyen, H.L. Bateman, C.J. Jarchow, E.P. Glenn, W.J. Waugh, C. van Riper III, C. 2018. Northern tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) and tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) interactions in the Colorado River Basin. Restoration Ecology 26:348-359.

Andrade, R., H.L. Bateman, and Y. Kang 2017. Seasonality and land cover characteristics drive aphid dynamics in an arid city. Journal of Arid Environments. 51:361-385.

Banville, M.J, H.L. Bateman, S.R. Earl, and P.S. Warren 2017. Decadal declines in bird abundance and diversity in urban riparian zones. Landscape and Urban Planning. 159:48-61.

Kang, Y., D. Bai, L. Tapia, and H.L. Bateman 2017. Dynamical effects of biocontrol on the ecosystem: Benefits or Harm?. Applied Mathematical Modelling. 51:361-385.

Bridges, A., H.L. Bateman, A.K. Owens, C.A. Jones, W. Miller 2016. Microhabitat selection of juvenile Sonoran Desert tortoises (Gopherus morafkai) in central Arizona, USA. Chelonian Conservation and Biology. 15 (2):219-230.

Mosher, K.R. and H.L. Bateman 2016. The effects of riparian restoration following saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) biocontrol on habitat and herpetofauna along a desert stream. Restoration Ecology. 24:71-80.

Bateman, H.L., J.C. Stromberg, M.J. Banville, E. Makings, B.D. Scott, A. Suchy, D.M. Wolkis 2015. Novel Water Sources Restore Plant and Animal Communities along an Urban River. Ecohydrology. 8:792–811.

Rudd, B.T. and H.L. Bateman 2015. Reptile Use of Trails in the Phoenix Mountain Parks. Herpetological Review. 46(1):15-17.

Bateman, H.L., D.M. Merritt, E.P. Glenn, and P. L. Nagler 2014. Indirect effects of biocontrol of an invasive riparian plant (Tamarix) alters habitat and reduces herpetofauna abundance. Biological Invasions. 17:87-97.

Nagler, P.L., S. Pearlstein, E.P. Glenn, T.B. Brown, H.L. Bateman, D.W. Bean, and K.R. Hultine 2014. Rapid dispersal of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) biocontrol beetles (Diorhabda carinulata) on a desert river detected by phenocams, MODIS imagery and ground observation. Remote Sensing of Environment. 140:206-219.

Research Activity: 
Summer 2021
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 592Research
Spring 2021
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 355Vertebrate Adaptations
ABS 473Applied Ornithology
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
ABS 499Individualized Instruction
ABS 500Research Methods
ABS 590Reading and Conference
ABS 592Research
ABS 593Applied Project
ABS 598Special Topics
ABS 599Thesis
Fall 2020
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 472Applied Herpetology
ABS 555Wildlife Dynamics
ABS 598Special Topics
ABS 599Thesis
Summer 2020
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 592Research
Spring 2020
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 355Vertebrate Adaptations
ABS 473Applied Ornithology
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
ABS 499Individualized Instruction
ABS 500Research Methods
ABS 590Reading and Conference
ABS 592Research
ABS 593Applied Project
ABS 598Special Topics
ABS 599Thesis
Fall 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 472Applied Herpetology
ABS 555Wildlife Dynamics
ABS 598Special Topics
ABS 599Thesis
Spring 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 355Vertebrate Adaptations
ABS 473Applied Ornithology
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
ABS 499Individualized Instruction
ABS 500Research Methods
ABS 590Reading and Conference
ABS 592Research
ABS 593Applied Project
ABS 598Special Topics
ABS 599Thesis
Fall 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 472Applied Herpetology
ABS 555Wildlife Dynamics
ABS 598Special Topics
ABS 599Thesis
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 355Vertebrate Adaptations
Fall 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 355Vertebrate Adaptations
ABS 472Applied Herpetology
ABS 489Undergraduate Research
ABS 555Wildlife Dynamics
ABS 592Research
ABS 593Applied Project
ABS 595Continuing Registration
ABS 598Special Topics
ABS 599Thesis
Spring 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 355Vertebrate Adaptations
ABS 473Applied Ornithology
Fall 2016
Course NumberCourse Title
ABS 355Vertebrate Adaptations
ABS 472Applied Herpetology
ABS 598Special Topics
Honors / Awards: 

Conservationist of the Year Award to the Cherry Creek Science team, Arizona/New Mexico Chapter of the American Fisheries Society (2016)

Wildlife Professional Service Award, Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society (2015)

Faculty Mentor Award, ASU College of Technology and Innovation (2012)

Editorships: 

Editorial Board of Restoration Ecology

Professional Associations: 

The Wildlife Society

Society for Restoration Ecology

Graduate Faculties / Mentoring History: 

Current MS Students

Brittany Allen, ASU 4+1 BS/MS

Lab Alumni

Cheyenne Herzog, MS (Dec 2019) Thesis: Responses of mammals to native and non-native riparian forest types in Southeastern Arizona

Sidney Riddle, BS (Dec 2018) Thesis: The effects of aridification and mesquite encroachment on riparian herpetofauna of the lower San Pedro River, Arizona

Lauren Jackson, BS (July 2017) UG Thesis: Difference in ectoparasite loads in whiptail lizards with sexual modes and from native and non-native habitats 

Tiffany Sprague, MS (May 2017) Thesis: Microhabitat and movement assessment for northern Mexican gartersnakes (Thamnophis eques megalops) at Bubbling Ponds Hatchery

Riley Andrade, MS (May 2016) Thesis: Response of waterbird communities to habitat and landscape structure along an urban gradient in Phoenix, Arizona

Shaneen Beebe, MS (May 2016) Applied Project: Heavy metal trends in feathers of Burrowing Owls in New Mexico: spatial, temporal, and gender assessments

Linda Ramirez, MS (May 2015) Applied Project: Wildlife Inventory of Rancho Del Cielo, Vail, Arizona

Kent Mosher, MS (Dec 2014) Thesis: Herpetofauna community responses to saltcedar biological control and riparian restoration along a Mojave Desert stream

Aaron Switalski, MS (May 2013) Thesis: Effects of artificial water sources on small mammal communities

Andy Bridges, MS (Dec 2012) Thesis: Sonoran desert tortoise (Gopherus morafkai) growth and juvenile habitat selection at a long-term study site in central Arizona 

Melanie Banville, MS (May 2011) Thesis: Herpetofauna and riparian microhabitat of urban and wildland reaches along the Salt River, Arizona

Danny Nielsen, MS (May 2011) Thesis: Effects of saltcedar on population structure and habitat utilization of the Common Side-blotched Lizard