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Sandra Price

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Lecturer
Faculty, DTPHX Campus, Mailcode 4020
Lecturer
Faculty, DTPHX Campus, Mailcode 4020
Lecturer
Faculty, DTPHX Campus, Mailcode 4020
Lincoln Center Affiliated Faculty
Faculty, DTPHX Campus, Mailcode 4020
Lecturer
Faculty, DTPHX Campus, Mailcode 4020
Biography: 

Dr. Price knows Arizona and has a wide network here.  I have resided primarily in Arizona, since I was 18, with the exception of the time I was earning my Ph.D.  I have had clients and colleagues in every corner of the state. Indian Reservations, major urban centers and small communities, as well as many institutions and organizations have been my clients and collaborators.  I still count many of those contacts among my friends and colleagues, and these contacts give me a leg up on anything I’d like to get done.  Even when I was studying out-of-state, work and political colleagues still called on me to assist them in various ways through the connections I have nurtured through the years.

Dr. Price understands the value of making diversity meaningful. In 2007 I was accepted into a life-changing program called the Diversity Infusion Institute, with the purpose of helping faculty ensure curriculum and teaching is representative and inclusive, that all students have meaningful access to the opportunities presented by the University, and that diversity is leveraged for the benefit of students and institution. That experience greatly enlarged my understanding of and commitment to D&I work. The most important takeaway: regardless of my personal behavior, if I do not actively work to dismantle discrimination and bias – especially institutional bias - when I come across it, I allow it to perpetuate and am part of the problem.  Since that time, I have participated in institutional change efforts, not just around teaching, but around institutional change efforts, through ASU’s Campus Committee on Inclusion, and Watts College’s Committee on Diversity and Inclusion.  I am also an affiliate of the ASU Center for the Study of Race and Democracy, through which I personally facilitated a workshop in communicating across boundaries, organized ASU’s DACA workshop in 2016, facilitated a workshop for nonprofit organizations on advocacy and researched and co-drafted a report to the Watts College dean on the need for enhanced services for foreign students and students with disabilities on ASU’s downtown campus and the need for clearer education about how to report discrimination incidents, all in 2018.

Dr. Price understands training and adult education, on and off-line.  I have both a Juris Doctorate and a Ph.D.  Prior to becoming university faculty, I held trainings in facilitation, mediation, change management, conflict management, Title XII discrimination, advocacy and other topics related to my law practice.  Since entering my Ph.D program (Public Administration and Policy) in 2004, I was selected for the prestigious Preparing Future Faculties Fellowship, through which I received excellent training in pedagogical science, and in online and classroom teaching strategies.  Through graduate school and since graduating, I have had the pleasure of teaching students in topics including environmental policy, sustainability management, nonprofit management, leadership and ethics, social inclusion and community development, social innovation and entrepreneurship courses and more.  Learning doesn’t end with the classroom.  What we know about social change is that learning for adaptation is a life-long and community-wide endeavor. 

Dr. Price understands economic development. I was fortunate to work for Dr. Ioanna Morfessis, a world-renowned economic development expert, when she was the executive director for Phoenix Economic Growth Corporation, and went with her at her request to found Greater Phoenix Economic Council.  I was GPEC’s marketing director and later special projects director until I decided to enter law school.  During that time I oversaw the marketing aspects of the expansion of Sky Harbor Center, did community- based research with the stakeholders in downtown and midtown Phoenix on the financial health of downtown for the office of the Mayor, and worked with city and county elected and appointed officials on an assortment special projects.  As a lawyer, I represented municipalities and associations on tax issues such as varied as tax increment financing and the impact of Arizona’s tax structure on small business.  Currently I periodically act as research consultant and facilitator for Dr. Morfessis’ consulting firm, Io Inc. on a variety of national and local economic development projects.  Examples of recent projects have included comparative economics research on global, national and local health care, research on the medical device industry, comparative economic development research on Canada to prepare the State of Alaska for strategic planning in light of falling oil prices and facilitation for the Pima Association of Governments (PAG) Economic Vitality Advisory Committee on transportation corridor planning.

Dr. Price understands health care and the community of health care stakeholders.  As a legislative attorney, I had the opportunity to represent a hospital system and a community of women’s health centers.  Later, as a consultant for Vitalyst, I facilitated a community-wide health and wellness strategic planning initiative for the town of Apache Junction, Arizona.  Later, as an interim director for the American Academy of Pediatrics, I worked to provide doctors with best practice information and practice support, and connected with both doctors and administrators at hospitals and rural health care centers across the state.  During the time I was interim (about a year and two months), I sorted out a financial disaster left by a former ED fired for embezzlement, launched three fundraising programs, was instrumental in developing increasing the telemedicine capacity for small communities through workshops and one-on-one assistance; saved a failing care coordinator program and overhauled an antiquated program designed to provide medical care to children without health insurance by partnering with federally qualified health care centers across the state, increasing the number of children and families with health care access several-fold. I have also had the opportunity to delve into comparative global health care data and to become familiar with the mechanics and provisions of the Affordable Care Act.

Dr. Price understands the world of conservation and environmental policy.  As a law student (cum laude), I specialized in environmental, natural resources and administrative law, and consequently was selected by ASU’s law school dean to represent the law school in Governor Symington’s office as the aide to Natural Resources cabinet chair, Rita Pearson, and then at her request accompanied her to the Department of Water Quality when she was appointed its director.  Upon passing the bar and entering private practice, I almost immediately landed a contract with the City of Tucson to be their lead legislative attorney, a position I retained until health issues with my younger daughter required that I shift gears. Tucson’s most pressing issue was (and remains) water, both quantity and quality issues. In that capacity, I negotiated compliance issues, assisted with rule-making and legislative initiatives, and stepped up as the lead on several state- and region-wide initiatives.  Later, I picked up clients in northern Arizona (Prescott Valley) and then went in-house with The Nature Conservancy Arizona Chapter, where I successfully steered the organization’s legislative agenda at a time when the political body was becoming increasingly hostile, working collaboratively with a Republican leadership on issues such as adaptive forest maintenance against fire, water conservation, and riparian and ecosystem preservation across the state. I maintain nearly all of the relationships I formed during those years. 

Dr. Price is trained to listen, articulate, collaborate and persuade.  All of my career opportunities have required a strong ability to listen, respect, articulate, write and design paths forward through sticky matters. Until the political environment became obstructionist, I worked with a wide variety of stakeholders to craft public policy.  My projects ranged from participation on a work group to rewrite Arizona’s groundwater code, where the stakeholders demonstrated their trust in me by choosing me to run two extremely important and highly political subcommittees, one on small business policy and the other on funding for groundwater clean-up, to being lead for an amazing team of seven environmental organizations and their affiliates through a successful ballot initiative in Pima County that resulted in $170 million in open space protection.  On top of this, I have approximately 500 hours of mediation, facilitation and arbitration training, undertaken during the break in my career trajectory to assist with my daughter, and probably hundreds of mediations and facilitations under my belt.  Clients for this work included U of A Medical Center, the Arizona Attorney General’s office (for Title VII discrimination arbitrations), the SEC (FINRA arbitrations), the Maricopa County Superior Court, the Salt River Pima Maricopa Community, and others.  Between passing my Ph.D comprehensive exams, which unfortunately I achieved just as the economy folded in 2008 – accompanied by a near nation-wide moratorium on faculty hiring - and obtaining my current faculty position at Arizona State University, I built a consultancy assisting nonprofit organizations such as the O’Connor House, the Arizona State Parks Foundation, Tohono Chul Park, the Grand Canyon National Park, and others.  While consulting for O’Connor House, I spearheaded two successful projects including designing a collaborative program (with ASU College of Law, a local law firm, Volunteer Lawyers Program and others) to exponentially increase the number of lawyers serving victims of domestic violence, and a second project in collaboration with Maricopa Association of Governments to help the victim advocate community assess its needs for professional development and implement training programs.  While assisting the State Parks Foundation, I facilitated strategic planning to repurpose the organization as the state began to defund the Parks system in light of economic trends, and rebuilt the organization’s board capacity to facilitate that work.  For Tohono Chul Park, I was first commissioned to facilitate the management team through a debilitating morale issue, and has been followed by an annual staff “check-up.”  More recently, I was engaged to assist the Grand Canyon National Park’s science team in an asset mapping exercise to help them identify resources and collaborative partners in the face of dwindling financial support from Washington, DC. 

Dr. Price is an excellent innovator and problem-solver.  One of the blessings of having had such a diverse set of opportunities (writing, marketing, law, conflict management, diversity, academia) is the value of exposure to several different modalities of analysis and engagement, and many opportunities to apply them.  I have become excellent at turning each Rubik’s cube puzzle until I find workable solutions. These skills served me well as a lobbyist and policy wonk, as a strategist and planner, and as an educator, and they continue to serve as I assist nonprofits who are struggling to find their way forward through the shifting economy.  I am an extremely creative and adept a facilitating community and organizational problem-solving, and I am not frightened by the seemingly impossible. 

Dr. Price understands the need to give back to community.   All of my career choices have enabled me to contribute to the wellbeing of individuals, organizations and communities.  Outside of and in tandem with my employment, I have had many opportunities to serve the community, from service on the State Parks Foundation board to serving on the board of advisors for the nascent Arizona Friends of the Homeless.  I am more or less on call to the many small nonprofits who take my students in for assorted projects – I pay them back by being available to discuss their issues.  The list of nonprofits for which I have volunteered over the years is too long to list, so suffice it to say that I am highly motivated to give back and significantly impact changed my approach to community development, stakeholder engagement and, of course, teaching.  For example, I am currently an ASU Piper Fellow, a program that is enabling me to study and explore barriers that often make it difficult for academic researchers to successfully collaborate with community organizations for the well-being of our communities.  On a smaller scale, I piloted a program for St. Vincent de Paul for reconnecting their “guests” with long lost family members that is now becoming part of SVdP’s available services, supervised students’ development of a bilingual cookbook featuring local produce to educate Maricopa County’s “food insecure” about how to cook locally-available produce.  With the ASU Center for the Study of Race and Development, I am piloting an asset mapping project across the ASU community to identify all research, programs and services dealing with diversity, inclusion, social justice and equity.  I have also run ethics workshops for young African and Asian NGO leaders, and for youth sports coaches.  And, in the three short years I have been here, I have built a willing network of nonprofits who eagerly help me prepare the next generation of nonprofit professional by participating in applied project work.  This barely touches on my motivation for doing good in the community, but I hope it gives you some idea of my interests and motivation.

 

Education: 
  • Ph.D. Public Administration (Public Policy), University of Missouri 2009
  • J.D. Arizona State University 1993
  • B.S. Communication Studies, Arizona State University 1981
Summer 2021
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 572Community & Social Innovation
Spring 2021
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 220Introduction to Nonprofit Orgs
NLM 310Volunteer Management
Fall 2020
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 220Introduction to Nonprofit Orgs
NLM 572Community & Social Innovation
Summer 2020
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 572Community & Social Innovation
Spring 2020
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 220Introduction to Nonprofit Orgs
NLM 310Volunteer Management
Fall 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 220Introduction to Nonprofit Orgs
NLM 572Community & Social Innovation
CRD 572Community & Social Innovation
Summer 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 572Community & Social Innovation
CRD 572Community & Social Innovation
Spring 2019
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 220Introduction to Nonprofit Orgs
CRD 302Inclusive Community Developmnt
NLM 310Volunteer Management
Summer 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 572Community & Social Innovation
CRD 572Community & Social Innovation
Spring 2018
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 220Introduction to Nonprofit Orgs
CRD 302Inclusive Community Developmnt
NLM 310Volunteer Management
NLM 493Honors Thesis
Summer 2017
Course NumberCourse Title
NLM 572Community & Social Innovation
CRD 572Community & Social Innovation